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Rethinking Journalism Ethics, Objectivity in the Age of Social Media

Rethinking Journalism Ethics, Objectivity in the Age of Social Media
In response to the rapidly changing media environment, many schools and academic programs are offering novel approaches to journalism education. This seismic change creates tensions within programs, especially when it comes to how to teach ethics for this increasingly mixed media. In an earlier column, I put forward some principles for teaching ethics amid this media revolution. But these principles do not address some specific problems. Whither objectivity? Today, students don’t just learn how to report straight news on deadline. Schools of journalism have always taught, to some extent, what is called “opinion journalism,” such as learning to write an editorial that supports a candidate for political office. One problem is whether the ideal of journalistic objectivity should be emphasized in these changing curricula. The new journalism tends to be more personal. So the question is: Should educators maintain or abandon objectivity in their teaching? Photo by Roger H. Redefining Objectivity

http://www.pbs.org/mediashift/2011/07/rethinking-journalism-ethics-objectivity-in-the-age-of-social-media208/

Objectivity (journalism) Journalistic objectivity is a significant principle of journalistic professionalism. Journalistic objectivity can refer to fairness, disinterestedness, factuality, and nonpartisanship, but most often encompasses all of these qualities. Definitions[edit] Sociologist Michael Schudson argues that "the belief in objectivity is a faith in 'facts,' a distrust in 'values,' and a commitment to their segregation.

UNT talk-Objectivity in Journalism University of North Texas Nature Writing Symposium talk: “Changing the World One Story at a Time” April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Wendee Holtcamp – bohemian@wendeeholtcamp.com Suppose you are given a bucket of water. You're standing there holding it. Rethinking Objective Journalism July 8, 2003 | Like this article? Join our email list: Stay up to date with the latest headlines via email. Questioning Journalistic Objectivity Journalism, as we've known it, has been mourned deeply over the last few years. The Internet has changed everything. "Citizen journalism," a phrase that still inspires dirty looks at most journalism conferences, has blurred the lines between objectivity and subjectivity, paid and unpaid labor, news and opinion. It gives veteran journalists agita to imagine totally untrained people messing around in their exclusive, albeit hardscrabble, club. With all this reshaping and shifting of our industry, all this talk about changing financial models and publishing structures, now is an opportune time to question one of the field's most defended values: objectivity. This issue has been particularly present for me as I'm on the final stages of writing a book -- a collection of profiles of ten people under 35 who are doing interesting social justice work.

Principles of Journalism The first three years of the Project’s work involved listening and talking with journalists and others around the country about what defines the work. What emerged out of those conversations are the following nine core principles of journalism: 1. Journalism’s first obligation is to the truth Democracy depends on citizens having reliable, accurate facts put in a meaningful context. Journalism does not pursue truth in an absolute or philosophical sense, but it can–and must–pursue it in a practical sense. Bob Schieffer, Ron Paul and journalistic “objectivity” CBS News‘s Bob Schieffer is the classic American establishment TV journalist: unfailingly deferential to the politically powerful personalities who parade before him, and religiously devoted to what he considers his own “objectivity,” which ostensibly requires that he never let his personal opinions affect or be revealed by his journalism. Watch how thoroughly and even proudly he dispenses with both of those traits when interviewing Ron Paul last Sunday on Face the Nation regarding Paul’s foreign policy views. You actually believe 9/11 was America’s fault? Your plan to deal with the Iranian nuclear program is to be nicer to Iran? This interview is worth highlighting because it is a vivid case underscoring several points about the real meaning of the much-vaunted “journalistic objectivity”:

Objectivity has changed – why hasn’t journalism? The following is cross-posted from a guest post I wrote for Wannabe Hacks. Objectivity is one of the key pillars of journalistic identity: it is one of the ways in which we identify ourselves as a profession. But for the past decade it has been subject to increasing criticism from those (and I include myself here) who suggest that sustaining the appearance of objectivity is unfeasible and unsustainable, and that transparency is a much more realistic aim. Recently I’ve been revisiting some of the research on journalistic objectivity for my inaugural lecture at City University. Objectivity and Fairness - Objectivity and fairness in news stories You hear it all the time – reporters should be objective and fair. Some news organizations even use these terms in their slogans, claimed that they are more “fair and balanced” than their competitors. But what is objectivity, and what does it mean to be fair and balanced? Objectivity Objectivity means that when covering hard news, reporters don’t convey their own feelings, biases or prejudices in their stories. They accomplish this by writing stories using a language that is neutral and avoids characterizing people or institutions in ways good or bad.

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