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Cannes Lion Award-Winning "Three Little Pigs advert"

Cannes Lion Award-Winning "Three Little Pigs advert"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vDGrfhJH1P4

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50 Powerful Photos Capture Extraordinary Moments In The Wild These amazing photos show animals in a way that you’ve never seen them before. Each image serves as a reminder that we share the planet with some truly awe-inspiring creatures. John Chaney / National Geographic Ian Schofield / National Geographic Video for the English classroom For the language teacher, YouTube may be nothing less than one of the best sources of material the classroom has ever seen. In this article, I would like to share 12 clips that I have used in my own classroom. I hope that each clip will be representative of a type of video that may be of particular interest to language teachers.

Yoga - with dogs It started in the US, when a growing band of health-conscious dog owners wanted a way of combining their favourite exercise with spending quality time with their pets. Now 'Doga' - yoga with dogs - is growing in popularity in the UK, mainly thanks to the efforts of Swiss-born yoga teacher Mahny Djahanguiri. She runs classes in London for people and their pets, and while the dogs do not really get a yoga workout themselves, they certainly play a part in some of the poses. A spokesperson from the Dogs Trust said: "It is important to remember that dogs can't tell us when they have had enough. Doga, and any variation of it, should always be carried out under the watchful eye of trained professionals."

Overview By Amy Mitchell and Tom Rosenstiel of PEJ In 2011, the digital revolution entered a new era. The age of mobile, in which people are connected to the web wherever they are, arrived in earnest. More than four in ten American adults now own a smartphone. The hole in the fence Question time! If you could take a photograph of the 5 happiest moments of your life so far, what would they show? What 5 events of your future would you like to take a photograph of? Story starter! I was puzzled. Forget John Lewis, this is the saddest Christmas ad you'll ever see Handkerchiefs at the ready: the German supermarket chain Edeka has aired a Christmas ad that could top John Lewis’s “Man on the Moon” as this season’s biggest tear-jerker. In the ad, which has been viewed on YouTube almost 10m times, a lonely old man comes up with drastic measures to bring his family together: he fakes his own death. It starts with the man, played by British actor Arthur Nightingale, receiving a voicemail from his daughter telling him that, once again, the family won’t make it home for Christmas.

Shakespeare Solos: watch the first six films Adrian Lester, Hamlet ‘To be or not to be’ Adrian Lester performs Hamlet’s soliloquy from act III, scene 1, in which the prince reflects on mortality and considers taking his own life. Joanna Vanderham, Romeo and Juliet ‘The mask of night is on my face’ “Syrian Society Is Beginning to Fall Apart” Neighbors are turning on their neighbors, according to refugees who have escaped Syria’s bloody conflict for eastern Lebanon. Though fears of civil war have been frequently reported over the past few months, these Sunni refugees described sectarian violence in western Syria that is more widespread than previously understood. Umm Nasser, a 34-year-old Sunni woman, said that as her family tried to flee their village two weeks ago, they came under attack from residents of a neighboring Alawite village. “We know them,” she told The New York Times‘ Anne Barnard. “We used to live side by side.”

Creative writing prompts that you can do in 10 minutes What can you write in 10 minutes or less? Let’s find out! For a quick creative writing exercise, try one of the 21 writing prompts below, excerpted from Chronicle Books’ 642 Tiny Things to Write About. Each prompt was created by a writing teacher at the San Francisco Writers Grotto to be done in 10 minutes or less. Mexican doodles I never had a class that didn’t ask if I wear a kilt when I am in my country. I wonder if Mexican teachers working away from home get asked the same thing about sombreros. This is a silly game that I remember from my childhood. I really hope my Mexican friends forgive me for taking advantage of their national dress stereotype in the name of grammar teaching. Language level: Beginner (A1)Learner type: Young learners; Teens; AdultsTime: 20 minutesActivity: Grammar drillTopic: StereotypesLanguage: Noun phrases (with the –ing form of the verb)Materials: None Mexican doodles

The Story of Bottled Water - The Story of Stuff Project The Story of Bottled Water, released on March 22, 2010 (World Water Day), employs the Story of Stuff style to tell the story of manufactured demand—how you get Americans to buy more than half a billion bottles of water every week when it already flows virtually free from the tap. Over five minutes, the film explores the bottled water industry’s attacks on tap water and its use of seductive, environmental-themed advertising to cover up the mountains of plastic waste it produces. The film concludes with a call for viewers to make a personal commitment to avoid bottled water and support public investment in clean, available tap water for all.

Meyer Berger Meyer "Mike" Berger (September 1, 1898 – February 8, 1959) was an American journalist, considered one of the finest newspaper reporters.[1] He was also known for "About New York", a long-running column in The New York Times, and for his centennial history of that paper. Since the year after his death, Columbia School of Journalism annually gives the Berger Award to a reporter for outstanding local reporting.[2] Early life[edit] Meyer Berger was born in New York City on September 1, 1898, the son of a Czechoslovakian (that is, from Austria-Hungary) immigrant father and a storekeeper mother. Sometime after his birth, the family moved from the Lower East Side to the Williamsburg section of Brooklyn.

Newspaper job cuts surged 30% in 2011 The number of jobs eliminated in the newspaper industry rose by nearly 30% in 2011 from the prior year, according to the blog that has been tracking the human toll on the industry for the last five years. Meanwhile, a separate analysis confirms what most of us already suspected: The proportion of cutbacks was higher in newsrooms than it was for the industry as a whole – twice as high by the calculations I will share in a moment. First, let’s take a look at the surprising surge of job cuts in 2011, a year that many newspaper people had hoped would be a time of relative stability after five years of successive revenue declines.

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