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An “overwhelming majority” of Huffington Post editorial workers asked management Tuesday to voluntarily recognize that they’ve joined a union, the Writers Guild of America, East. Word of a unionization move at the high-profile digital media company surfaced in early October, and Arianna Huffington indicated back then she was agreeable to voluntarily recognize a union if the majority so desired. Now what the union characterizes as most of the roughly 350 editorial employees, most of whom work in New York City, have signed up with the union, which represents about 4,000 media workers. Those include writers on “The Daily Show with Trevor Noah,” writers-producers in non-fiction TV and network radio and TV copy writers. Voluntary recognition would mean avoiding a formal election process on whether the union was the collective bargaining representative of the workers. Read more Tools: Permalink

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How Entrepreneurial Journalism Will Change Our World January 24, 2011 | 4 Comments Think about the best article you read last year. The hard hitting, excellently researched, insightfully written article that you just couldn't put down. Now think about how much money you spent to read it. Was it in a magazine you subscribe to? Or perhaps a website that you accessed and read for free?

Nicholas Negroponte: The Physical Book Is Dead In 5 Years Today at the Techonomy conference in Lake Tahoe, CA, CNBC’s Maria Bartiromo sat down with a panel including Bill Joy, Kevin Kelly, Nicholas Negroponte, and Willie Smits. The topic was basically the future of technology. And Negroponte had the most interesting (or at least the most controversial) thing to say. The physical book is dead, according to Negroponte. He said he realizes that’s going to be hard for a lot of people to accept. But you just have to think about film and music.

Dan Shapiro Posted: March 29th, 2014 | Author: Dan | Filed under: Startups | 6 Comments I’m told Amazon writes the press release for a product before beginning development. I don’t know exactly how the process works, but this has been sloshing around in my head mixed in with a bunch of other tidbits. Like the trick of running ads that lead to a signup page before you build anything to see how many people are interested. Or the notion that a crowdfunding campaign validates demand before you go build it (although it requires a lot more investment). Recently Apptentive asked me about marketing techniques for apps.

Video Professor Tries To Bully Washington Post, Fails (via @arrington ) Video Professor continues to be angry that I called them a scam in my original Scamville post. They’ve gotten nowhere reaching out to me directly (more on that below), so now they’ve tried complaining to the Washington Post, which has syndicated our content since 2008. The Washington Post stood firm beside us today and kept our original post as written. Good for them. Essentially Video Professor is arguing that they didn’t have the chance to respond to our post before we published, and that in general we aren’t behaving very journalistically. Facebook's Growing Role in Social Journalism A Facebook-only news organization? It was only a matter of time. The Rockville Central, a community news site in the Washington, D.C., area, will move all its operations and news coverage to its Facebook Page starting on March 1. This risky move by the site's editor, Cindy Cotte Griffiths, highlights Facebook's growing role as a platform for journalists to use for social storytelling and reporting.

Sean Parker: Facebook Will Still Be The Vital Network 10 Years From Now Today at the Techonomy conference in Lake Tahoe, CA host David Kirkpatrick sat down with Reid Hoffman and Sean Parker to talk about what follows social media. Specifically, Kirkpatrick asked the two what follows the social networks like Facebook? Parker was quick to answer. A Cocktail Party With Readers I haven’t been tweeting long enough to judge its merits. But I note that some Times writers and editors have become prolific at it, sending out thousands of tweets to thousands and, in some cases, hundreds of thousands of followers. For them, the online service, which allows you to transmit 140-character messages and links, has emerged as a vast medium of information exchange. Is this a good thing, I wondered, or an epic waste of time?

Explore the Titanic Wreck Site via Social Media [EXCLUSIVE] A team of archaeologists, scientists and oceanographers will soon be revisiting the wreck of the Titanic for further scientific discovery and documentation. The entire process will be shared in near real-time with the world via social media. The mission, Expedition Titanic, is meant to not only preserve the iconic ship — disintegrating two and half miles beneath the sea — but also to expose the wreck site to the public for the first time. It's a scientific undertaking like no other, but one with a very modern twist that relies heavily on social media to share the mission with the world. Why Curation Is Important to the Future of Journalism Josh Sternberg is the founder of Sternberg Strategic Communications and authors The Sternberg Effect. You can follow him on Twitter and Tumblr. Over the past few weeks, many worries about the death of journalism have, well, died.

Apple Adds New Features to App Store Sprucing up the App Store with new bells and whistles has been a high priority for Apple as of late. This week, Apple launched a new Genius recommendation tab for the iPad App Store, a helpful tool that will enable app lovers to filter through thousands of applications to find ones that are appropriately suited to their preferences. Although Genius recommendations for the iPad was previously available exclusively via the desktop iTunes interface, the mobile version of this attribute should prove particularly helpful, especially in terms of providing insightful suggestions about other apps you may want based on Apple’s assessment of your recent purchases and perceived taste in apps. In addition to the Genius upgrade, Apple also rolled out a new “Try Before You Buy” component for the App Store, which delivers free “light” versions of otherwise paid apps.

Crowdfunded photojournalism platform Emphas.is receives $21K from 'backers' After going live in early March the site claims to already have more than $20,000 in backing from the public A new platform for crowdfunded photojournalism which aims to build a community around projects has received more than $20,000 in backing, just over a week since it went live. Emphas.is works by inviting story proposals and an expenses budget estimate from professional photojournalists, to be reviewed by a board of advisers working against a set list of criteria. Individuals can then make a contribution to approved projects, giving them access to a 'making-of' zone, where photojournalists communicate with their 'backers' through blogging, video and pictures as well as directly. After going live earlier this month with nine projects, the site reported thousands of dollars in backing just days in, reaching $21,000 at the end of last week. Each project is given a deadline by when 100 per cent of funding must have been raised.

Extras Needed for Transformers 3 ‘Transformers 3: Actors on set’courtesy of ‘Martin Dougiamas’ Transformers 3 will be shooting in DC later this summer, and the city’s Office of Motion Picture and Television Development is looking for extras. If you’re interested, send a photo of yourself and some other information to movie@taylorroyall.com. They’re also interested in your car, and you get bonus points if you’ve done ‘precision driving’. No word on exactly what they’ll be filming in DC, but the Washington Post reports that “the robots will be here“. The District is just one of several US cities where Transformers 3 will be shooting. The newsonomics of U.S. media concentration The rise and potential fall of Rupert Murdoch is a hell of a story. It is, though, closer to the Guardian’s Simon Jenkins’ description Tuesday, “not a Berlin Wall moment, just daft hysteria.” Facing only the meager competition of the slow-as-molasses debt-ceiling story, the Murdoch story managed to hit during the summer doldrums. Plus it’s great theater.

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