background preloader

Global Forest Change

Global Forest Change

http://earthenginepartners.appspot.com/science-2013-global-forest

Related:  Déforestation / Reforestationcartes diverses / à classerMapsForests

More than 44,000 people came together to set the Guinness World Record for reforestation. A group in Ecuador set a world record over the weekend by planting nearly 650,000 trees in a single day. Agence France-Presse reports that on May 16, 2015, nearly 45,000 people took part in the largest single-day reforestation project ever. In total, 647,250 trees (and more than 220 species of plants) were planted on roughly 5,000 acres of land, marking a new Guinness World Record. Woo! Volunteers begin reforesting an area near Catequilla, Ecuador. Photo by Rodrigo Buendia/AFP/Getty Images. 40 more maps that explain the world Maps seemed to be everywhere in 2013, a trend I like to think we encouraged along with August's 40 maps that explain the world. Maps can be a remarkably powerful tool for understanding the world and how it works, but they show only what you ask them to. You might consider this, then, a collection of maps meant to inspire your inner map nerd.

Our Favorite Maps of the Year Cover Everything From Bayous to Bullet Trains "I really love the challenge of making new things look old," said mapmaker Stephen Smith. He was inspired to make this map of US natural resources by a similar British map from around 1940 that he came across in the Boston Public Library. "Many people told me my map reminded them of their grade school wall atlas," he said. Stephen Smith Stamen Design produced this map---and more than 300 others like it---for the National Audubon society's report on climate change.

History of American Forests: Tree maps made for 1884 census. The Vault is Slate's history blog. Like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter @slatevault, and find us on Tumblr. Find out more about what this space is all about here. These tree maps, commissioned by the United States Census and published in 1884, were compiled at the direction of dendrologist and horticulturist Charles Sprague Sargent. The complete set of sixteen maps, digitized by the David Rumsey Map Collection, represents American forests by genus of tree, density, and position.

Buffer: Polygon Selectable Distance Esri, DeLorme, FAO, IFL, NGA, NOAA, USGS, EPA | Pick a tool and draw on the map. The drawn graphic will be buffered based on the specified parameters. ●Line ●Polyline ●Freehand Polyline ●Polygon ●Freehand Polygon Buffer Parameters Setting a country alight: Indonesia's devastating forest fires are manmade We are witnessing the worst manmade environmental disaster since the BP gulf oil spill. Huge, out-of-control fires rage through the forests of Indonesia – and the source of many is the practice of deliberately burning the land to clear it for palm oil and paper products. Thousands of fires have been lit to clear land simply because it is 75% cheaper than other methods. By burning down forests companies can get access to the land and can commence industrial pulp and palm oil plantations. The blazes are occurring in the peatland forests of Kalimantan and Sumatra, which is a unique wetland ecosystem home to threatened species.

40 maps that explain the internet The internet increasingly pervades our lives, delivering information to us no matter where we are. It takes a complex system of cables, servers, towers, and other infrastructure, developed over decades, to allow us to stay in touch with our friends and family so effortlessly. Here are 40 maps that will help you better understand the internet — where it came from, how it works, and how it's used by people around the world. How the internet was created Before the internet, there was the ARPANET Before the internet, there was the ARPANETARPANET, the precursor to the modern internet, was an academic research project funded by the Advanced Research Projects Agency, a branch of the military known for funding ambitious research projects without immediate commercial or military applications.

20 maps that never happened Maps are a powerful way of illustrating not only the world that is, but worlds that never have been. What follow are not fictional maps — there's no Westeros or Middle Earth — but plans and hypotheticals that never came to pass. You'll see military plans for invasions that didn't happen or conquests that were hoped-for and never achieved. Mapping the World’s Forests in Three Dimensions By Michael Carlowicz Design by Robert Simmon January 9, 2012 Trees cool and moisten our air and fill it with oxygen. They calm the winds and shade the land from sunlight. Buffer: Population Selectable Area (c) ESRI and its data partners | Esri, DeLorme, FAO, IFL, NGA, NOAA, USGS, EPA |

The Eco-Apocalypse in Indonesia That No One is Talking About Alex Pietrowski, StaffWaking Times Some of the most devastating fires the world has ever seen are happening right now in Indonesia, and this unfolding disaster is getting little attention. Annual fires during the dry season have become typical in the last 20 years or so as slash and burn rainforest farming techniques have ravaged this once pristine part of the world, but now this year they are catastrophic. Some 5000 fires have burned in Borneo alone in just the last 2 months. Territorial map of the world Today, we are beginning to envision the world as a continuous space where the movement of people and information overrides geographical and political barriers. This political map of the world depicts the extent of territories, both on land and at sea (submerged lands), which are under the control of all independent nations. The map incorporates Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZ), which are sea zones whose resources belong to their coastal-lying nations.

How Big Is Your City, Really? When our sense of a place distorts its actual size. In almost every way in which we humans view the world, scale and context are crucially important. When we build a skyscraper, it’s impressive because it’s so much taller than what’s around it, or what’s come before it. When we learn of a new chameleon, it’s wonderful because it’s so much smaller than anything else we’ve ever seen before.

The Where and When and How of forest cover change in 5 infographics Written by Nancy Harris, Rachael Petersen, Crystal Davis and Octavia Payne for Global Forest Watch Today, we have more data about forests than ever before, but we still can’t seem to agree on where, when and why forests are changing around the world. Even two prominent global data sources appear to disagree, at least on the surface.

Related: