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Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse

Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse
Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, - Conquest, War, Famine & Death, an 1887 painting by Victor Vasnetsov. The Lamb is visible at the top. White Horse[edit] Then I saw when the Lamb broke one of the seven seals, and I heard one of the four living creatures saying as with a voice of thunder, “Come.” I looked, and behold, a white horse, and he who sat on it had a bow; and a crown was given to him, and he went out conquering and to conquer.— Revelation 6:1-2˄ NASB The rider has also been called "Pestilence", particularly in pop culture (see below). As righteous[edit] Irenaeus, an influential Christian theologian of the 2nd century, was among the first to interpret this horseman as Christ himself, his white horse representing the successful spread of the gospel.[3] Various scholars have since supported this notion,[5] citing the later appearance, in Revelation 19, of Christ mounted on a white horse, appearing as The Word of God. As infectious disease[edit] As evil[edit] Red Horse[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four_Horsemen_of_the_Apocalypse

Related:  Angels and DemonsInterest & Intrigue

Nikolaos The name "Nicolaitans" is derived from the Greek word nikόlaos, a compound of the words nikos and laos. The word nikos is the Greek word that means to conquer or to subdue as already mentioned above. The word laos is also where we get the word laity. When these two words are compounded into one, they form the name Nikolas, which literally means one who conquers and subdues the people. It seems to suggest that the Nicolaitans were somehow conquering and subduing the people. The Grigori The Watchers The Lord spoke: "Have no fear, Enoch, good man and scribe of goodness. Come hear my voice.

List of theological angels Paradiso Canto 31 This is a list of angels in theology, including both specific angels (e.g. Gabriel) and types of angels (e.g. Seraphim). Note that some overlap is to be expected with the list of theological demons entry, since various traditions have different classifications for the spirits they mention. Aevum The concept of the aevum dates back at least to Albertus Magnus’s treatise De quattuor coaequaevis.[3] Its most familiar description is found in the Summa theologica of Thomas Aquinas. Aquinas identifies the aevum as the measure of the existence of beings that “recede less from permanence of being, forasmuch as their being neither consists in change, nor is the subject of change; nevertheless they have change annexed to them either actually, or potentially.” As examples, he cites the heavenly bodies (which, in medieval science, were considered changeless in their nature, though variable in their position) and the angels, which “have an unchangeable being as regards their nature with changeableness as regards choice”.[4] Frank Sheed, in his book Theology and Sanity, said that the aevum is also the measure of existence for the saints in heaven: “Aeviternity is the proper sphere of every created spirit, and therefore of the human soul... Jump up ^ Anzulewicz, Henryk.

List of theological demons A demon This is a list of demons that appear in religion, theology, demonology, mythology, and folklore. It is not a list of names of demons, although some are listed by more than one name. Maalik In Islamic belief, Maalik (Arabic: مالك‎ / mālik) denotes an angel in Hell (Arabic: جهنم‎ / jahannam) who guards the Hellfire, assisted by 19 mysterious guardians known as ‏الزبانية / az-zabānīya. In the Qur'an, Maalik is mentioned in Sura 43:77, telling the wicked who appeal to him that they must remain in Hell because "they abhorred the truth when the truth was brought to them." According to Islamic legendary tradition, Muhammad was taken to see Heaven and Hell, and there, he saw Maalik, and was shown a glimpse of the suffering of the people of Hell.

The Grigori - Angelic Watchers The Grigori (from Greek egrgoroi, "The Watchers") are, in one popular version, a group of fallen angels described in Biblical apocrypha who mated with mortal women, giving rise to a race of hybrids known as the Nephilim, who are described as giants in Genesis 6:4. A different idea of the Grigori appears in some traditions of Italian witchcraft where the Grigori are said to come from ancient stellar lore. References to angelic Grigori appear in the books of Enoch and Jubilees. In Hebrew they are known as the Irin, "Watchers," found mentioned in the Old Testament Book of Daniel (chapter 4). According to the Book of Enoch, the Grigori numbered a total of 200 but only their leaders are named:

Archdemon In Biblical tradition, an archdemon (also spelled archdaemon) is a spiritual entity, prominent in the infernal hierarchy as a leader of the infernal host.[1] Essentially, the archdemons is the counterpart of the archangels. Archdemons are described as the leaders of demonic hosts, just as archangels lead choirs of angels. In the Occult tradition, there is controversy regarding which demons should be classed as archdemons. During different ages, some demons were historically 'promoted' to archdemons, others were completely forgotten, and new ones were created. In ancient Jewish lore, pagan gods of neighboring cultures were classed as extremely pernicious in order to protect Jews from worshiping them; therefore, Ba'al and Astarte were among the worst enemies of God. During the Middle Ages these characterizations were no longer important, but still persisted.

Watcher (angel) Watching angel on the spire of St Michael's church, Clifton Hampden, Oxfordshire, England In the Book of Daniel 4:13, 17, 23[4] there are three references to the class of "watcher, holy one" (watcher, Aramaic `iyr; holy one, Aramaic qaddiysh). The term is introduced by Nebuchadnezzar who says he saw "a watcher, a holy one come down (singular verb) from heaven." He describes how in his dream the watcher says that Nebuchadnezzar will eat grass and be mad and that this punishment is "by the decree of the Watchers, the demand by the word of the Holy Ones" - "the living may know that the Most High rules in the kingdom of men." After hearing the king's dream Daniel considers for an hour and then responds: Demon In Ancient Near Eastern religions as well as in the Abrahamic traditions, including ancient and medieval Christian demonology, a demon is considered an unclean spirit, sometimes a fallen angel, the spirit of a deceased human, or a spirit of unknown type which may cause demonic possession, calling for an exorcism. In Western occultism and Renaissance magic, which grew out of an amalgamation of Greco-Roman magic, Jewish demonology and Christian tradition,[2] a demon is a spiritual entity that may be conjured and controlled. Terminology[edit] The Greek term does not have any connotations of evil or malevolence. In fact, εὐδαιμονία eudaimonia, (literally good-spiritedness) means happiness. The supposed existence of demons remains an important concept in many modern religions and occultist traditions.

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