background preloader

Lifelong Kindergarten

Lifelong Kindergarten

http://llk.media.mit.edu/

Related:  Principle-Centered Learning EnvironmentTrainingScratch- Creative learning spacesVarios 2

Multimedia Educational Resource for Learning and Online Teaching Return to MERLOT II Home Page Search all MERLOT Select to go to your profile 7 Blogs You Should Really Read If You Are A Student Programmer If you want to succeed as a programmer, you need to immerse yourself in the programming culture. This is more true if you’re still a pupil. The field of programming is so broad and there’s so much information to absorb that you’ll never come out on top if you participate from a distance. Fortunately, blogs are a readily accessible medium keep you in the loop.

KIWI - A robotics construction set for young children Since 2007, through generous funding by the National Science Foundation (NSF Grant No. DRL-1118897, DRL-0735657), the DevTech Research Group has been researching how to create a developmentally appropriate robotics construction set for young children in Pre-K through 2nd grade. The first prototype was called KIWI and consisted of intuitive, easy to connect construction materials including: wheels, motors, light output, and a variety of sensors (Sound, Light, and Distance sensors). KIWI is designed to work without any screentime using wooden programming blocks. The KIWI prototype paved the way to developing KIBO which is now commercially available through Kinderlab Robotics.

MIT Media Lab - Building The Media Lab has expanded into a new, six-floor structure with approximately 163,000 square feet of laboratory, office, and meeting space designed by the Tokyo-based architectural firm of Maki and Associates. Together with the existing Wiesner Building (designed by MIT alumnus I. M. Pei), the complex will serve as a showplace for new concepts in design, communications systems, and collaborative research. The goal is to ignite a new energy and connectivity within the two-building complex, and then extend this energy beyond our walls—to our sponsors and to the world at large.

Connectivism Connectivism is a hypothesis of learning which emphasizes the role of social and cultural context. Connectivism is often associated with and proposes a perspective similar to Vygotsky's 'zone of proximal development' (ZPD), an idea later transposed into Engeström's (2001) Activity theory.[1] The relationship between work experience, learning, and knowledge, as expressed in the concept of ‘connectivity, is central to connectivism, motivating the theory's name.[2] It is somewhat similar to Bandura's Social Learning Theory that proposes that people learn through contact. The phrase "a learning theory for the digital age"[3] indicates the emphasis that connectivism gives to technology's effect on how people live, communicate and learn. Nodes and links[edit] The central aspect of connectivism is the metaphor of a network with nodes and connections.[4] In this metaphor, a node is anything that can be connected to another node such as an organization, information, data, feelings, and images.

Constructivism (learning theory) Jean Piaget: founder of Constructivism In past centuries, constructivist ideas were not widely valued due to the perception that children's play was seen as aimless and of little importance. Jean Piaget did not agree with these traditional views, however. Best Programming Languages Beginners Should Learn Computer science is a booming industry in the US — and it pays extremely well. There's always demand for sharp, talented engineers, which is why learning how to code can seem like an attractive option. But, as is the case with any new skill, it can be difficult to know where to start. Here are a few steps you should take early on and programming languages that are best-suited for beginners. Before you learn a language, start with 'drag and drop' programming. "Drag and drop" programming is a basic technique that allows you to build code by dragging and dropping blocks or some other visual cue rather than manually writing text-based code.

The effects of computer use on creative thinking among kindergarten children in Jordan. The objective of the current study was to examine the effect of early computer experience, using quasi-experimental design, on creative thinking among Jordanian kindergarten children. It intended to answer two main research questions. First, does adding a computer to a kindergarten environment enhance children's creative thinking? Second, does children's creative thinking differ due to gender? Experimental group consists of (37) and the control groups consist Of (39) child.

Related:  Learning TheoryInfos sur notre Mooc ITyPADesign and Development of Education Technology