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Smithsonian's History Explorer

Smithsonian's History Explorer

http://historyexplorer.si.edu/home/

Related:  Visual Literacy in the ClassroomE-booksSOCIAL STUDIES - American HistoryHistoriaVisual Literacy

Teaching History Resources - Historic Newspapers Looking after the world’s largest private archive of original newspapers means that we’re extremely passionate about history. This is why we decided to pick out interesting coverage from historical dates of significance so that others could learn about the past, as it was reported at the time! Our free teaching packs are available in order to help students discover the cause and consequence of historical events. Making of America aking of America (MoA) is a digital library of primary sources in American social history from the antebellum period through reconstruction. The collection is particularly strong in the subject areas of education, psychology, American history, sociology, religion, and science and technology. The collection currently contains approximately 10,000 books and 50,000 journal articles with 19th century imprints.

Ancient Egyptian scripts (hieroglyphs, hieratic and demotic) Origins of Egyptian Hieroglyphs The ancient Egyptians believed that writing was invented by the god Thoth and called their hieroglyphic script "mdju netjer" ("words of the gods"). The word hieroglyph comes from the Greek hieros (sacred) plus glypho (inscriptions) and was first used by Clement of Alexandria. The earliest known examples of writing in Egypt have been dated to 3,400 BC. The latest dated inscription in hieroglyphs was made on the gate post of a temple at Philae in 396 AD. The hieroglyphic script was used mainly for formal inscriptions on the walls of temples and tombs.

What’s Going On in This Picture - The Learning Network Blog Photo Updated: June 2, 2015 Note: This is our final “What’s Going On in This Picture?” for this school year, and a bit of an experiment since it is not photojournalism. Teacher Resources The Library of Congress offers classroom materials and professional development to help teachers effectively use primary sources from the Library's vast digital collections in their teaching. Find Library of Congress lesson plans and more that meet Common Core standards, state content standards, and the standards of national organizations. Using Primary Sources Discover quick and easy ways to begin using primary sources in your classroom, with teachers' guides, information on citing sources and copyright, and the Library's primary source analysis tool. TPS Partners

a Program of the National Park Service NEW! Arthurdale: A New Deal Community Experiment Explore Arthurdale, West Virginia, and discover a town founded during the Great Depression when First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt championed subsistence homestead communities for struggling Americans across the country. In this lesson, learn about the impoverished Appalachian mining town that Arthurdale's homesteaders left and the Progressive-era theories about communal work, school, and rural life they tested at their new home. Meet 21st Century State Standards with TwHP Teaching with Historic Places lesson plans, based on the inquiry method, provide teachers with materials and question sets that encourage analytical thinking. This makes them a great choice for classrooms where students need to meet Common Core state standards and social studies standards based on the College, Career & Civic Life Framework.

Marcus Aurelius Marcus Aurelius (/ɔːˈriːliəs/; Latin: Marcus Aurelius Antoninus Augustus;[1][notes 1] 26 April 121 – 17 March 180 AD) was Roman Emperor from 161 to 180. He ruled with Lucius Verus as co-emperor from 161 until Verus' death in 169. Marcus Aurelius was the last of the so-called Five Good Emperors. He was a practitioner of Stoicism, and his untitled writing, commonly known as the Meditations, is the most significant source of the modern understanding of ancient Stoic philosophy.

Common Core in Action: 10 Visual Literacy Strategies Do you wish your students could better understand and critique the images that saturate their waking life? That's the purpose of visual literacy (VL), to explicitly teach a collection of competencies that will help students think through, think about and think with pictures. Standards Support Visual Literacy Instruction Visual literacy is a staple of 21st century skills, which state that learners must "demonstrate the ability to interpret, recognize, appreciate and understand information presented through visible actions, objects and symbols, natural or man-made." Putting aside the imperative to teach students how to create meaningful images, the ability to read images is reflected in the following standards. Common Core State Standards (CCSS) CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.6-8.7: "Integrate visual information (e.g., in charts, graphs, photographs, videos or maps) with other information in print and digital texts."

Teaching Visual Literacy to Students Visual literacy is a multi-faceted subject matter, and faculty wishing to include images in their curriculum can quickly find themselves overwhelmed by the prospect of addressing visual literacy. For an introduction to the topic visit The Basics of Visual Literacy: Form, Context and Content. The following tools are intended to help faculty customize their curricula to incorporate visual literacy in ways that suit their individual instructional needs. Some faculty may want to teach visual literacy as a one-time in- or out-of-class activity. Root Word Dictionary - A dictionary of Greek and Latin roots Find Greek and Latin roots by meaning: First, click on the "Search for roots" link at the top of this page; Then, in the search box, enter the English meaning of the root you want to find; The root word you're looking for should show up in the results. More about using Root Word Dictionary: To understand how Greek and Latin roots word are used in constructing terminology: First, look a root word up in the dictionary; Then, look up similarly spelled prefixes and suffixes in the prefix and suffix dictionary on this site, which gives examples to show how these roots function in word origins; Next, look up the meanings of the example terms given in the prefix and suffix dictionary (most of which are linked to their definitions in the biology dictionary on this site). Latin and Greek Root Words The Greek and Latin roots listed in this dictionary are words from which the prefixes and suffixes used in constructing biological terminology are frequently derived.

Related:  Social StudiesAncient CivilizationsHistory WebsitesCurrent Events and Social Studies ToolsUS History