background preloader

The University of South Carolina Beaufort

The University of South Carolina Beaufort
So, you're still getting those 1,670,000+ responses to your search queries on the Web, and you're still too busy to do anything about it, like reading the lengthy, and sometimes confusing, "help" screens to find out how to improve your searching techniques. Look no further! Real help is here, in the USCB Library's BARE BONES Tutorial. You can zip through these lessons in no time, any time. They are very short and succinct; each can be read in a few minutes. Feel free to jump in wherever you like, skip what you don't want to read, and come back whenever you need to. The information contained in the following lessons is truly "bare bones," designed to get you started in the right direction with a minimum of time and effort. Lesson 1: Search Engines: a Definition Lesson 2: Metasearchers: a Definition Lesson 3: Subject Directories: a Definition Lesson 4: Library Gateways and Specialized Databases: a Definition Lesson 5: Evaluating Web Pages Lesson 6: Creating a Search Strategy Lesson 17: Yahoo!

http://www.sc.edu/beaufort/library/pages/bones/bones.shtml

Related:  Digital LiteracySearching Tutorials and toolsLibrary Science

Digital literacy Digital literacy is the ability to effectively and critically navigate, evaluate and create information using a range of digital technologies. It requires one "to recognize and use that power, to manipulate and transform digital media, to distribute pervasively, and to easily adapt them to new forms".[1] Digital literacy does not replace traditional forms of literacy. It builds upon the foundation of traditional forms of literacy.[1] Digital literacy is the marrying of the two terms digital and literacy; however, it is much more than a combination of the two terms. Digital information is a symbolic representation of data, and literacy refers to the ability to read for knowledge, write coherently, and think critically about the written word. Digital literacy researchers explore a wide variety of topics, including how people find, use, summarize, evaluate, create, and communicate information while using digital technologies.

Home - Evaluating resources - Library Guides at UC Berkeley To find out more about an author: Google the author's name or dig deeper in the library's biographical source databases. To find scholarly sources: When searching library article databases, look for a checkbox to narrow your results to Scholarly, Peer Reviewed or Peer Refereed publications. To evaluate a source's critical reception: Check in the library's book and film review databases to get a sense of how a source was received in the popular and scholarly press. Library Tutorials Jump to Navigation Ask Us! Off-Campus Access Libraries | Colorado State University You are here How to Properly Research Online (and Not Embarrass Yourself with the Results) Warning: if you are going to argue a point about politics, medicine, animal care, or gun control, then you better take the time to make your argument legit. Spending 10 seconds with Google and copy-pasting wikipedia links doesn't cut it. The standard for an intelligent argument is Legitimate research is called RE-search for a reason: patient repetition and careful filtering is what will win the day.

The 101 Most Useful Websites on the Internet Here are some of the most useful websites on the internet that you may not know about. These web sites, well most of them, solve at least one problem really well and they all have simple web addresses (URLs) that you can memorize thus saving you a trip to Google. And if you find this list useful, also check out the expanded version – The Most Useful Websites – which now offers a collection of 150+ undiscovered and incredibly useful websites to enhance your productivity. ctrlq.org/screenshots – for capturing screenshots of web pages on mobile and desktops. dictation.io – online voice recognition in the browser itself. Changelog and Updates

The Best Research and Reference Sites Online Whether you're looking for the average rainfall in the Amazon rainforest, researching Roman history, or just having fun learning to find information, you'll get some great help using my list of the best research and reference sites on the Web. Types of Reference Sites There are generally two types of reference sites.

Assessments of Information Literacy available online (Information Literacy Assessments) Forced-choice Tests (e.g., multiple-choice, true/false) Authentic Assessments (see Authentic Assessment Toolbox) History Information Literacy Assessment -- by A. Taylor - brief Sample Assignments -- from University of Maryland University College Portfolio Assessment -- from Teesside University -- description of portfolio assignments can be found in the appendix of this article, beginning on p. 32 Information Literacy Skills Survey -- from the Plano (Texas) Independent School District -- a series of fill-in-the-blank and short essay questions for the middle school level LILO (Learning Information Literacy Online) Tutorial plus Rubrics -- from the University of Hawai'i Libraries -- The first link takes you to an online tutorial that can be used as part of a course or completed independently. A nice feature of the tutorial is that you can have students complete journal entries associated with specific information literacy skills in response to specific prompts. Rubrics

WikiSummarizer WikiSummarizer is a Web-based application specializing in automatic summarization of Wikipedia articles. Automatic summarization is the creation of a shortened version of a text by a computer program. The result is a summary that presents the most important points of the original text. A summary is a shorter version of the original information. ABC-CLIO > ODLIS > odlis_A In classification, one of the distinguishing characteristics of a class, identified as a means of differentiating it from other classes. As defined in FRBR (Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Records), one of a set of characteristics enabling users of information to formulate queries and evaluate responses when searching for information about a specific entity. Attributes can be inherent in the entity (physical characteristics, labeling information, etc.) or supplied by an external agent (assigned identifiers, contextual information, etc.). For example, the logical attributes of a creative work include its title, form, date of creation, intended audience, etc.

Related:  wonderful web resources