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Center for Media Literacy

Center for Media Literacy
The Center for Media Literacy (CML) is an educational organization that provides leadership, public education, professional development and educational resources nationally and internationally. Dedicated to promoting and supporting media literacy education as a framework for accessing, analyzing, evaluating, creating and participating with media content, CML works to help citizens, especially the young, develop critical thinking and media production skills needed to live fully in the 21st century media culture. Check out the CML MediaLit Kit! NEW resources available... Media Literacy: A System for Learning AnyTime, AnyWhere...This is an ideal resource for administrators and staff who want to implement a comprehensive and systematic media literacy program in their district or school with a research-based framework. Media Literacy: A System for Learning has three parts: Change Management, Deconstruction, and Critical Construction.

http://www.medialit.org/

Related:  COLLECTION: Media Literacy and Fake NewsLITERACY(ies)Media LiteracyLITTÉRATIE NUMÉRIQUE - ÉDUCATION AUX MÉDIAS / DIGITAL LITERACY - MEDIA EDUCATIONdigital literacy

Special Report: The Changing Face of Literacy There has never been a generation of young people more immersed in digital media than this one, many of whom learned to use a mobile device before they even started school. This special report examines how literacy instruction is changing in the digital age, from learning to sound out words in elementary school to grappling with “Macbeth” in high school. It finds that, while experts quibble over what it means to be digitally literate, they agree on one thing: even the youngest children should be learning literacy with a mix of print and digital texts. Is the digital revolution transforming literacy instruction in the nation’s schools?

Can You Tell Fake News From Real? Study Finds Students Have 'Dismaying' Inability Stanford researchers assessed students from middle school to college and found they struggled to distinguish ads from articles, neutral sources from biased ones and fake accounts from real ones. Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images Stanford researchers assessed students from middle school to college and found they struggled to distinguish ads from articles, neutral sources from biased ones and fake accounts from real ones.

Division Media et Société de l'Information Conseil de l'Europe - Accueil The Internet Literacy Handbook Third edition Original version compiled by Janice Richardson (editor), Truth, truthiness, triangulation: A news literacy toolkit for a “post-truth” world We were guaranteed a free press, We were not guaranteed a neutral or a true press. We can celebrate the journalistic freedom to publish without interference from the state. We can also celebrate our freedom to share multiple stories through multiple lenses. But it has always been up to the reader or viewer to make the reliability and credibility decisions. Bias already exists in search engine results, and it’s only going to get worse The internet might seem like a level playing field, but it isn’t. Safiya Umoja Noble came face to face with that fact one day when she used Google’s search engine to look for subjects her nieces might find interesting. She entered the term “black girls” and came back with pages dominated by pornography. Noble, a USC Annenberg communications professor, was horrified but not surprised.

This is Why Media Literacy Matters in a Transforming World Media literacy has become a more important consideration in our children’s futures than ever. It behooves educators to be familiar with media’s role in our changing world. Media is here to stay as a main component of how society shares information across a vast population quickly.

UNESCO - Media and Information Literacy People across the world are witnessing a dramatic increase in access to information and communication. While some people are starved for information, others are flooded with print, broadcast and digital content. Media and Information Literacy (MIL) provides answers to the questions that we all ask ourselves at some point. How can we access, search, critically assess, use and contribute content wisely, both online and offline? Northstar Digital Literacy This page includes a variety of publicly available learning resources for the Northstar standards. These resources are not created by Northstar, but have been selected by our staff. We also provide comprehensive classroom curricula for each assessment, which have been created by Northstar - these curricula are available only through Northstar testing locations. Learn more about becoming a testing location. In the resources below, note that links to a text resource,

The End of Reality In a dank corner of the internet, it is possible to find actresses from Game of Thrones or Harry Potter engaged in all manner of sex acts. Or at least to the world the carnal figures look like those actresses, and the faces in the videos are indeed their own. Everything south of the neck, however, belongs to different women. Teaching Global Digital Citizenship? Use These 10 Essential Questions Teaching Global Digital Citizenship is all about asking the right questions. Today kids are building the foundations of a digital culture. They are contributors, creators, communicators, and designers.

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