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Map of Europe: 1000 AD to present day

Map of Europe: 1000 AD to present day

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Ten Amazing Inventions From Ancient Times Dating back thousands of years are numerous examples of ancient technology that leave us awe-struck at the knowledge and wisdom held by people of our past. They were the result of incredible advances in engineering and innovation as new, powerful civilizations emerged and came to dominate the ancient world. These advances stimulated societies to adopt new ways of living and governance, as well as new ways of understanding their world. However, many ancient inventions were forgotten, lost to the pages of history, only to be re-invented millennia later.

National Cold War Exhibition January 11 Jan - A ceasefire was announced in Greece between government forces and ELAS guerrillas; this agreement was confirmed by the government on 12 February. 4 Feb - Yalta Conference where Roosevelt, Churchill and Stalin meet to discuss terms of German surrender and the boundaries and governments in post war Eastern Europe.

Better Identification of Viking Corpses Reveals: Half of the Warriors Were Female Shield maidens are not a myth! A recent archaeological discovery has shattered the stereotype of exclusively male Viking warriors sailing out to war while their long-suffering wives wait at home with baby Vikings. (We knew it! We always knew it.) Plus, some other findings are challenging that whole “rape and pillage” thing, too. Researchers at the University of Western Australia decided to revamp the way they studied Viking remains. ChronoZoom ChronoZoom is an educational tool for teachers and students who want to put historical events in perspective. A great many resources have been created already in ChronoZoom for your enjoyment and enlightenment. Start Exploring Use ChronoZoom to get a perspective of the extensive scale of time and historical events relative to what happened around the world.

Dual DNA Streams For European Inheritance This is a careful analysis of the apparent DNA distribution throughout . It is observed that two groups of peoples emerged by way of naturally expanding populations. The Southern one is presumed to originate out of the Levant to dominate the Mediterranean littoral. I see no reason to do other than presume the initial flow from Anatolia into as pretty indicative of what was going on. Animation: Human Population Growth Over All of History Imagine that for every million people on Earth, there was a single dot on a map. In total, that would be about 7,600 dots – representing today’s global population of 7.6 billion. But, what if we went back in time, and watched those dots accumulate over human history? When and where do the first dots appear, and when does population growth ramp up to get to the billions of people that are alive today?

Encyclopedia: Medieval Cosmology and Worldview Medieval cosmology was centered around the concept of the Ptolemaic universe, named after Greek astronomer Ptolemy (ca. 150 CE). In this geocentric (earth-centered) model, the earth was the motionless center of the universe, with the rest of the universe revolving around it in spheres. Ptolemy's work was based on Aristotle's (384-322 BCE) idea of an ordered universe, divided into the sublunary, or earthly, region which was changeable and corruptible, and the heavenly region, which was immutable and perfect. Aristotle posited that the heavens contained 55 spheres, with the Primum Mobile, "Prime Mover" or "First Moveable", giving motion to all the spheres within it. Centermost in this cosmology was the Earth.

The Lifespan of Ancient Civilizations Detailed in a Handy Infographic: Are We Headed Towards Our Own Collapse? Anyone living in the West today surely feels they've heard quite enough about its decline. (Unless, of course, they're fans of 1980s punk rock.) Given how long civilizations usually outlive individuals, how can an individual grasp the prospects for longevity of the civilization in which they find themselves? History, a discipline which has long had everything to do with charting the rise and fall of settlements, cultures, and empires, can provide the context necessary for understanding, but more of it has been written than even a human with the lifespan of a civilization can digest. Come to provide some clarity is Luke Kemp of Cambridge's Centre for the Study of Existential Risk, creator of the infographic above.

The "Missing" American Plague When Europeans arrived in the New World in 1492, a new era of trading was born – everything from cultures and ideas to potatoes and tobacco. However, one thing that might have been skipped over in your history class was the huge transfer of diseases, viruses, bugs, and lurgies. Within 500 years, the native population of the Americas dropped by 90 percent. Although war and strife caused their fair share of deaths, the overwhelming majority were caused by a cocktail of smallpox, influenza, cholera, measles, Black Death, and other Old World diseases. But you would have thought that if the natives caught the Europeans' diseases, the Europeans would get the natives' diseases, right?

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