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37 Data-ish Blogs

37 Data-ish Blogs
You might not know it, but there are actually a ton of data and visualization blogs out there. I'm a bit of a feed addict subscribing to just about anything with a chart or a mention of statistics on it (and naturally have to do some feed-cleaning every now and then). In a follow up to my short list last year, here are the data-ish blogs, some old and some new, that continue to post interesting stuff. Data and Statistics By the Numbers - Column from The New York Times visual Op-ed columnist, Charles Blow, who also used to be NYT's graphics director.Data Mining - Matthew Hurst, scientist at Microsoft's MSN, also the co-creator of BlogPulse.Statistical Modeling - We might disagree on certain things, but Andrew's blog is one of the few active pure statistics blogs.The Numbers Guy - Data-minded reporting from Carl Bialik of the Wall Street Journal.Basketball Geek - Like statistical analysis and basketball? Statistical/Analytical Visualization Maps Design & Infographics Others Worth Noting

http://flowingdata.com/2009/05/06/37-data-ish-blogs-you-should-know-about/

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Diagram Software - The Best Choice for Diagramming All-in-one diagram software that makes it perfect for the following diagram software types. What's the diagram solution? Buy one diagram software that suits one group but forces the other to compromise and make do? How to become a data visualization ninja with 3 free tools for non-programmers We noticed many times between the lines of this blog how data visualization is in the hype and how this trend is growing and growing. That’s good news guys! It’s fun and it’s … success! But as more and more people join this wild bunch we have to take care of those who are not as skilled as we are yet. There are many people out there who love data visualization but they think they are out of this business because they are not able to code. I personally think that this is a problem and that we have to be as inclusive as we can.

Edward Tufte Edward Tufte is a statistician and artist, and Professor Emeritus of Political Science, Statistics, and Computer Science at Yale University. He wrote, designed, and self-published 4 classic books on data visualization. The New York Times described ET as the "Leonardo da Vinci of data," and Business Week as the "Galileo of graphics." He is now writing a book/film The Thinking Eye and constructing a 234-acre tree farm and sculpture park in northwest Connecticut, which will show his artworks and remain open space in perpetuity.

Data Visualization: Modern Approaches « Smashing Magazine Data presentation can be beautiful, elegant and descriptive. There is a variety of conventional ways to visualize data – tables, histograms, pie charts and bar graphs are being used every day, in every project and on every possible occasion. However, to convey a message to your readers effectively, sometimes you need more than just a simple pie chart of your results. In fact, there are much better, profound, creative and absolutely fascinating ways to visualize data. Data visualization books: How to start your personal library The Excel Charts Blog There are many approaches to data visualization. Take well-know authors like Tufte, Cleveland, Ware, Few, Bertin or McCandless. There is some overlap, but they all approach data visualization from a different angle. That’s great news for you: this means that you can come up with a unique point of view that reflects your interests and needs. I suppose the books you buy are consistent with that view.

The Joy of Stats About the video Hans Rosling says there’s nothing boring about stats, and then goes on to prove it. A one-hour long documentary produced by Wingspan Productions and broadcast by BBC, 2010. A DVD is available to order from Wingspan Productions. Director & Producer; Dan Hillman, Executive Producer: Archie Baron. What is Visualization? A Definition What is a visualization? The word is problematic, and there have been very few definitions that try to define this field we are working in. More importantly: what is not a visualization? It is easy to argue that anything visual is a visualization in some way – but does that mean anything? Here is a definition of visualization and a few examples to illustrate the different criteria.

Visualization-based data discovery tools Visualization-based data discovery tools may account for less than 5 % of the Business Intelligence (BI) Market, but they are fighting above their weight in terms of profile. In 2011, Gartner placed Visualisation at the peak of the BI Hype Cycle. Despite this indicating the category may lose some of its lustre , Gartner are still predicting a compound annual growth rate of 30% in each of next 5 years. If true, this means the category will increase in value from $427 to $1,606 million over the period, a growth rate 3 times that of the overall BI market. So what are Data Visualisation tools and how are they defined? According to Gartner, there are 3 common elements

Shared storage for OpenStack based on DRBD-Mozilla Firefox Storage is a tricky part of the cloud environment. We want it to be fast, to be network-accessible and to be as reliable as possible. One way is to go to the shop and buy yourself a SAN solution from a prominent vendor for solid money. Another way is to take commodity hardware and use open source magic to turn it into distributed network storage. Guess what we did? We have several primary goals ahead.

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