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Caricature Map of Europe 1914

Caricature Map of Europe 1914
The Clanker Powers: Germany is a massive military machine with weapons aimed outwards to all surrounding countries. It points threateningly at Britain, not so much as a sign of direct aggression, but more as an indicator that it was now Germany’s turn to start a grand global Empire to challenge the world’s current one. Austria Hungary is an aggressive armoured giant, teetering on shoddy foundations. It is also the primary aggressor in a land grab against Serbia, with two bayonets piercing the border. The Ottoman empire is a teetering automaton, collapsing under the weight of a paranoid and ungainly spying network that gazes at Europe through many lenses and spy glasses. The Swiss watch ticks away the time, comfortable to wait it all out. The Darwinist Powers: Britain is an militaristic lion with a Roman Imperial italic-type helmet. Russia is a huge imperialist bear, rotting and filled with maggots. Portugal is a parrot for the Entente trying to goad a slumbering Spain into the war.

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Don't write first world war women out of history The spy and the nurse. Two women have lingered since the first world war. Mata Hari had been a circus performer and exotic dancer, and therefore satisfied traditional prejudices when she was accused of espionage and shot by the French. Edith Cavell was a brave and pious nurse whom the Germans arrested for helping British soldiers escape occupied Belgium. She too was executed and became a near-martyr. 10 Wonders of the World You Don’t Know Our World While most of these wonders will be known to a few people, they are, on the whole, not as well known as the famous “seven wonders”. Despite that, each has a reason for being considered wonderful and deserves its spot on this list. Enjoy the list and be sure to share other lesser-known wonders in the comments. Banaue Rice Terraces

It’s a Google Streetmap of history: How our famous landmarks looked up to 170 years ago By Daily Mail Reporter Updated: 07:19 GMT, 7 November 2011 A website has taken the notion of the 'Now and Then' photo to another level with their 'Google Streetmap of history' which allows people to see what a British street looked like 10, 20 or even 100 years ago. Like a photographic trip down memory lane, the phone app allows users to 'pin' photos to places on the map meaning you can see how the world has changed since the photo was taken, and read the stories behind the area. A vibrant Cambridge Market in the 1900's and today with several marquees in place

Man Tries to Hug a Wild Lion, You Won't Believe What Happens Next! When you hear of someone trying to hug a wild lion, you immediately think you know exactly what’s about to happen. But trust me when i say, you will not see this coming. Kevin Richardson is a South African Zoologist who over the years has conducted extensive research on the native animals of the African plains. If this was any one other than Kevin trying to hug a lion, we may have had an all too predictable story to tell. Piri Reis map Surviving fragment of the Piri Reis map showing Central and South America shores. In his notes appended to it is written "the map of the western lands drawn by Columbus"[1] The Piri Reis map is a world map compiled in 1513 from military intelligence by the Ottoman admiral and cartographer Piri Reis (pronounced [piɾi ɾeis]).

These rebellious teens resisted the Nazis by beating up Hitler Youth, and some paid with their… On July 17, 1943, the Düsseldorf-Grafenberg branch of the Nazi party reported to the Gestapo on the growth of a new menace. Certain “youngsters,” party members warned, “aged between 12 and 17, hang around into the late evening, with musical instruments and young females. Since this riff-raff is to a large extent outside the Hitler Youth and adopts a hostile attitude toward the organization, they represent a danger to other young people.” The briefing concerned the so-called Edelweiss Pirates, a collection of adolescent groups engaged in rebellious assembly and behavior throughout the western industrial cities of the Reich. Not especially organized, the Edelweiss Pirates were part clique, part gang, part political resistance, and perhaps most of all an emerging subculture.

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The Average Female Faces Around the World To determine the average female face from each country, scientists from Face Research have blended hundreds of photographs of women faces… FaceResearch Lebensraum: Policy or Rhetoric? When the Germans talked of Lebensraum, or ‘living space’, they used the term to denote a perceived need to have enough physical room to provide for themselves comfortably. In particular, it identified the possession of enough land to feed a population large enough to ensure Germany a place on the world stage. Hitler did not just start talking about the need to conquer Lebensraum in 1941; its origins lay much further back than even 1939. Anti-Nazi newspaper columnists (for example in Der Deutsche in Polen) observed during the late 1930s that Hitler’s foreign policy involved something more than just planless initiatives, improvisation and contradictory imperatives. They said that its main direction had been well-established during the mid-1920s. The second volume of Mein Kampf, published in December 1926, contained a chapter entitled ‘Eastern Orientation and Eastern Policy’.

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