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Developing Questions for Critical Thinking

Developing Questions for Critical Thinking
The revised cognitive domain introduced by Lorin Anderson in the 1990's revised the original domains by changing from noun to format and realigning the categories. In the revised domain remembering serves as the lowest level of thinking and creating serves as the highest. Use the links below to work with the recently revised categories. Use the tabs at the top of the page to work with the original domains and categories. Click on the various links below to learn how you can use the revised cognitive domain categories to develop learning objectives, questions to challenge your students, and assignments. Clicking on the categories found at the bottom of this page will also link you to information about key words that can be used as guides to structure learning objectives, questions and tasks.

http://farr-integratingit.net/Theory/CriticalThinking/revisedcog.htm

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Instructional Design The Taxonomy Table How to Write Objectives Adapted from A Taxonomy for Learning, Teaching, and Assessing: A Revision of Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives. Lorin W. Andersin, David R. The Differentiator Try Respondo! → ← Back to Byrdseed.com Propaganda Techniques Propaganda designers have been putting messages into television commercials, news programs, magazine ads, and other things we read and see for years. These messages have been carefully designed to influence our opinions, emotions, attitudes and behavior. Their purpose is to persuade us to believe in something or to do something that we would not normally believe or do. These messages have been designed to benefit someone, and that someone may not be you!

21st century education Revised August 2008. Your Assignment, Should You Choose to Accept It . . . Like Alice, many educators, policy makers and even the general public respond resoundingly with "That's impossible!" Toulmin Model Stephen Toulmin, originally a British logician, is now a professor at USC. He became frustrated with the inability of formal logic to explain everyday arguments, which prompted him to develop his own model of practical reasoning. The first triad of his model consists of three basic elements: A claim is the point an arguer is trying to make. The claim is the proposition or assertion an arguer wants another to accept. Assessing Web 2.0 Projects Through Bloom And Time « Education with Technology Harry G. Tuttle Assessing Web 2.0 Projects Through Bloom And Time I offer the following mini-assessment of any Web 2.0 project as a way to refocus our attention on student learning rather than the Web 2.0 tool. Take the highest level of Bloom achieved during the project 1- Knowledge 2.

Wikipedia: Critical Thinking Critical thinking is a type of clear, reasoned thinking. According to Beyer (1995) Critical thinking means making clear, reasoned judgements. While in the process of critical thinking, ideas should be reasoned and well thought out/judged.[1] The National Council for Excellence in Critical Thinking defines critical thinking as the intellectually disciplined process of actively and skillfully conceptualizing, applying, analyzing, synthesizing, and/or evaluating information gathered from, or generated by, observation, experience, reflection, reasoning, or communication, as a guide to belief and action

Bloom’s Taxonomy by Patricia Armstrong, Assistant Director, Center for Teaching Background Information In 1956, Benjamin Bloom with collaborators Max Englehart, Edward Furst, Walter Hill, and David Krathwohl published a framework for categorizing educational goals: Taxonomy of Educational Objectives. Bloom’s Digital Taxonomy Resources As part of preparing for a series of presentations at various conferences this year, I have developed six quick sheets for Bloom’s Digital Taxonomy. These resources outline the different taxonomic levels and provide the Digital Taxonomy Verbs with some (this is not exhaustive) possibilities for classroom use. For the complete Bloom’s Digital Taxonomy go to the Educational Origami Wiki @ Here are the quick sheets: As always I would appreciate comments, feedback and suggestions.

Critical thinking web We have over 100 online tutorials on different aspects of thinking skills. They are organized into modules listed below and in the menu above. Our tutorials are used by universities, community colleges, and high schools around the world. The tutorials are completely free and under a Creative Commons license. Bloom's Digital Taxonomy This is the introduction to Bloom's Digital Taxonomy. The different taxonomical levels can be viewed individually via the navigation bar or below this introduction as embedded pages. This is an update to Bloom's Revised Taxonomy which attempts to account for the new behaviours and actions emerging as technology advances and becomes more ubiquitous. Bloom's Revised Taxonomy describes many traditional classroom practices, behaviours and actions, but does not account for the new processes and actions associated with Web 2.0 technologies, infowhelm (the exponential growth in information), increasing ubiquitous personal technologies or cloud computing.Bloom's Digital Taxonomy isn't about the tools or technologies rather it is about using these to facilitate learning. Outcomes on rubrics are measured by competence of use and most importantly the quality of the process or product.

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