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Here's Everyone Who's Immigrated to the U.S. Since 1820

Here's Everyone Who's Immigrated to the U.S. Since 1820
From 1820 to 2013, 79 million people obtained lawful permanent resident status in the United States. The interactive map below visualizes all of them based on their prior country of residence. The brightness of a country corresponds to its total migration to the U.S. at the given time. Use the controls at the bottom to stop / resume the animation or to move back and forth in time. Two Centuries of U.S. Immigration (1 dot = 10,000 people) Over time, the sources of immigration trace a clear path across the world. Through most of the 1800’s, immigration came predominantly from Western Europe (Ireland, Germany, the U.K.). Here are the largest immigration “waves” charted over time, showing the progression. While it may seem that immigration over the last few decades has been higher than ever before, the picture looks very different when viewed relative to the size of the U.S. population. Here is the same chart, with the immigration shown as a percentage of the U.S. population. Credit: Related

http://metrocosm.com/animated-immigration-map/

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Declassified US Nuclear Targets Even though today’s nuclear targets list is classified, it probably doesn’t look dramatically different. The United States still has about 1,900 nuclear warheads deployed on missiles and bombers (with thousands more on reserve), ready to be launched at a moment’s notice and able to hit their targets within 30 minutes. This unstable situation is extremely risky and has repeatedly come close to triggering nuclear war by accident. Moreover, many of today’s hydrogen bombs are hundreds of times more powerful than the two atom bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

All the World's Immigration Visualized in 1 Map This map shows the estimated net immigration (inflows minus outflows) by origin and destination country between 2010 and 2015. Blue circles = positive net migration (more inflows). Red circles = negative net migration (more outflows). Slavery in America - Black History The South would reach the breaking point the following year, when Republican candidate Abraham Lincoln was elected as president. Within three months, seven southern states had seceded to form the Confederate States of America; four more would follow after the Civil War (1861-65) began. Though Lincoln’s antislavery views were well established, the central Union war aim at first was not to abolish slavery, but to preserve the United States as a nation. Abolition became a war aim only later, due to military necessity, growing anti-slavery sentiment in the North and the self-emancipation of many African Americans who fled enslavement as Union troops swept through the South. Five days after the bloody Union victory at Antietam in September 1862, Lincoln issued a preliminary emancipation proclamation, and on January 1, 1863, he made it official that “slaves within any State, or designated part of a State…in rebellion,…shall be then, thenceforward, and forever free.”

Retrace Samuel Pepys’ steps in the Great Fire of London On Saturday 1 September 1666 the City of London sat nestled within its Roman walls away from the rest of the surrounding districts. It was a thriving, bustling world of narrow cobbled streets filled with timber-framed, thatched buildings. Its wharfs and docks on the River Thames flowed with people, goods and talk of wars with the Dutch and the French. Born: 23 February 1633, central LondonDied: 26 May 1703, Clapham, SurreyEducation: Huntington Grammar/St Paul's School/Cambridge UniversityHighest position held: Chief secretary to the admiralty under both King Charles II and King James II This was the world of Samuel Pepys, Clerk of the Acts to the Navy Board and diarist. He had grown up in the city and, with a talent for administration and hard work, was a rising star in the English Admiralty of King Charles II.

Mapped: The world's nuclear power plants NUCLEAR | March 8. 2016. 17:19 Mapped: The world’s nuclear power plants From the latest crisis over plans for Hinkley Point in the UK, to Friday’s fifth anniversary of the Fukushima disaster, nuclear power plants are currently much in the news. To help provide a global overview of the nuclear power sector both today and throughout its history, Carbon Brief has produced this interactive map. It shows the location, operating status and generating capacity of all 667 reactors that have been built, or are under construction, around the world, ever since Russia’s tiny Obninsk plant became the first to supply power to the grid in 1954.

Watch as the world's cities appear one-by-one over 6,000 years Watch the rise of human cities, beginning with [arguably] the world’s first city in 3700 BC and continuing up to the present. Use the controls at the bottom to pause/resume the map and to move back and forth in time. The history of urbanization, 3700 BC – 2000 AD (full-screen version) full screen / videoFor each city, this map shows the date of the earliest recorded population figure, which is not necessarily the date when the city was founded. Compare Sweden To The United States With its 318,892,103 people, The United States is the 3rd largest country in the world by population. It is the 3rd largest country in the world by area with 9,826,675 square kilometers. Britain's American colonies broke with the mother country in 1776 and were recognized as the new nation of the United States of America following the Treaty of Paris in 1783.

Comments Jacob Wilson I love that these numbers are small enough for Trump supporters to understand but even that is a little high of an expectation! 260 · Yesterday at 3:37am 9/11 Attacks - Facts & Summary On September 11, 2001, at 8:45 a.m. on a clear Tuesday morning, an American Airlines Boeing 767 loaded with 20,000 gallons of jet fuel crashed into the north tower of the World Trade Center in New York City. The impact left a gaping, burning hole near the 80th floor of the 110-story skyscraper, instantly killing hundreds of people and trapping hundreds more in higher floors. As the evacuation of the tower and its twin got underway, television cameras broadcasted live images of what initially appeared to be a freak accident. Then, 18 minutes after the first plane hit, a second Boeing 767–United Airlines Flight 175–appeared out of the sky, turned sharply toward the World Trade Center and sliced into the south tower near the 60th floor.

Geografi - Studi.se Upload Studi.se Studi.se Block by Block, Brooklyn’s Past and Present On my weekly walk to get groceries, I pass a row of brownstones — some well-kempt and majestic, some fossil-like and crumbling — bookended by a gleaming, square-windowed silver tower. It’s an architectural contrast of a kind that’s commonplace throughout Brooklyn. The borough’s a patchwork of the old and new, but traces of its history aren’t spread evenly.

4 maps that will change how you see migration in Europe Did you know that Polish people represent the highest percentage of the foreign-born population in Norway? Or that the largest proportion of immigrants to the Republic of Ireland hail from the UK? These four maps, created by Jakub Marian, a Czech linguist, mathematician and artist, are based on a 2015 study by the United Nations on international migration. They show European migration split into various numbers:

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