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Going Green Underground: Eco-Retro Earth House Designs They may look a bit dated at first, or at least more whimsical than required for functional living. Still, these earth houses have more to offer than custom curves and a unique aesthetic – including a set of design philosophies, strategies and tactics that are far from just superficial nods to sustainable trends. The designs take everything into account from fire and earthquake protection to integral insulation-efficient arches and buffer rooms for energy-free temperature control. While not every Erdhaus is actually built under the existing ground on a site, they are all tied to their earthen surroundings by sloping sheaths of greenery. Grass-covered walls curve up and continue as green roofs along the tops of each structure.

Is Cordwood Masonry "Green?" by Rob Roy I write a Q and A column about cordwood masonry for Kelly Hart's excellent Green Home Building website, www.greenhomebuilding.com Recently, the following question came in, and I got so caught up in it that I called BackHome magazine editor Richard Freudenberger to see if he'd like to see it expanded into an article. So here it is. Question from Anonymous: How can you consider cordwood as "green" when it uses so much cement in the mortar? Great question, one I'm glad to have the opportunity to answer. First, I guess we have to come up with some sort of definition about what "green" means, with regard to building.

DIY Dry Creek Beds If you want to make a dramatic statement in your garden, without a lot of maintenence, a DIY dry creek bed is the way to go. It gives your yard a natural feel, without having to manage a real water feature. And they are surprisingly easy to DIY, but still have a professional look to the finished project. Earth Sheltered Homes “Another type of building is emerging: one that actually heals the scars of its own construction. It conserves rainwater and fuel and it provides a habitat for creatures other than the human one. Maybe it will catch on, maybe it won’t. We’ll see.” – Malcolm Wells, 2002.

Pebble Pathways Pebble Pathways"Nobody trips over mountains. It is the small pebble that causes you to stumble. Pass all the pebbles in your path and you will find you have crossed the mountain." Unknown. A pebble and stone path with gaps increases permeability. Looking for a new house? Eco-friendly underground home on the market in Md. posted Categories: Homes / Dwellings FOX 29 News Philadelphia | WTXF-TV If you're looking for a new place to live, this home on the market in Prince George's County in Maryland will probably give you a double take after you look at it. What makes it stand out is that the home is partially underground.

Nifty Homestead Cordwood homes and barns: Also known as stack wall, log end, stovewood or cordwood masonry. If you do the labor yourself, and use wood from your property, this is a very inexpensive and environmentally friendly way to own a home. Alan Adolphson’s Cordwood Home in Hope, Maine The whole house is built with 14″ Aspen (poplar). All the walls are load bearing. Stone Furniture Stone FurnitureNo more plastic! Or vinyl, or PVC! Stone Couch at Chanticleer Gardens, Wayne, PennsylvaniaImage by Carolyn's Shade Gardens, Bryn Mawr, PA.carolynsshadegardens.com Stone chair at Chanticleer Gardens, Wayne, Pennsylvania.Image by Carolyn's Shade Gardens, Bryn Mawr, PA.carolynsshadegardens.com

Eccentric Aesthetics: DIY Eco-Friendly Earthbag Homes The phrase “form follows function” has morphed in meaning over time and is, perhaps rightly, open to interpretation. One interesting extension of this idea is that the form of a building can follow the functions of its constituent parts – that the visual result can reflect the process of construction and that this, in turn, makes the architecture more educational or “honest” – a way to learn the history of a building simply by taking a look at how it was made. In addition to their do-it-yourself, easy-to-build and other sustainability-related benefits, “earth bag” homes – constructed of bags filled with local dirt, mud, sand and/or rock – are also potentially extremely expressive as works of design. Their structural properties and the ways in which they are stacked certainly preclude some design possibilities but they enable others.

Cordwood For Beginners - Accidental Hippies Cordwood Masonry is great for DIY builders but requires knowledge and practice to do successfully. Here we’ll provide you the valuable resources we used to get our building off the ground and show you some tricks we learned along the way. Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links! Buying through my affiliate links provides me with a small commission, and you don’t pay a dime extra! By making a purchase through our affiliate links, you help keep this blog and homestead project going, so thank you!

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