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Layers of the Earth and Seismic Waves

Layers of the Earth and Seismic Waves

http://ees.as.uky.edu/sites/default/files/elearning/module06swf.swf

Related:  Earth Science

SAVAGE EARTH Online Please note: SAVAGE EARTH ONLINE looks best when viewed using Netscape 3.0 or above, or Internet Explorer 3.0 or above, on Macintosh, Windows 95 or Windows 3.1. If you have an earlier version, or another browser, all pages may not be presented exactly as designed. To view the animations in SAVAGE EARTH ONLINE, you will need the free Flash plug-in. Premiere: July 19, 1998, at 8 pm (ET) on PBS. (Watch for repeat showings on your local PBS station.) From the legendary fury of Mt.

Geologic Time Initially compiled by Laurie Cantwell, Montana State University This section highlights animations, images, interactive graphics and videos used to teach the concept of geologic time in an introductory geology course. Visualizations cover the specific topics of earth history, relative age dating and life through geologic time. Click here to browse the complete set of Visualization Collections. Earth History ChronoZoom (more info) ChronoZoom is a free, open source interactive timeline tool for learning about all kinds of history, stretching back all 13.7 billion years to the Big Bang. The Changing Oceans The face of the Earth is always changing and throughout geologic history oceans have been created and destroyed. Modern geologic evidence indicates that the ocean bottom is moving at a rate from about one-half to six inches a year through a process called plate tectonics. Roughly 200 million years ago the Earth's surface was very different from the familiar pattern of land we know today. All of the land masses were grouped together into one vast supercontinent called Pangaea.

Exploring Magnetic Fields Purpose To reinforce the concept that magnets attract and repel items and exert a magnetic field that can vary in strength. Context By exploring magnets, students are indirectly introduced to the idea that there are forces that occur on earth which cannot be seen. This idea can then be developed into an understanding that objects, such as the earth or electrically charged objects, can pull on other objects.

Ring of Fire The Ring of Fire is a string of volcanoes and sites of seismic activity, or earthquakes, around the edges of the Pacific Ocean. The Ring of Fire isnt quite a circular ring. Its shaped more like a 40,000-kilometer (25,000-mile) horseshoe. Electricity & Magnetism: Magnetic Fields Magnetic fields are different from electric fields. Although both types of fields are interconnected, they do different things. The idea of magnetic field lines and magnetic fields was first examined by Michael Faraday and later by James Clerk Maxwell. Both of these English scientists made great discoveries in the field of electromagnetism. Geologic Hazards Some volcanic eruptions are mild and slow, while others are powerful and dramatic. An eruption happens when magma, gases, or steam break through vents in the Earth's surface. A mild eruption may simply discharge steam and other gases, or quietly extrude lava. A strong eruption can consist of violent explosions that send great clouds of gas-laden debris into the atmosphere, or may consist of explosions that blast sideways from a collapsed portion of the volcano, as happened in the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens. Eruptions can alter the land and water locally through lava flows, lahars, pyroclastic flows, and landslides.

Discovering Plate Boundaries Maps Downloads All materials created for DPB may be downloaded freely for classroom use. Copyright of all these materials remains with Dale S. Cascades Volcano Observatory Why Study Cascade Volcanoes? Cascade Range Active volcanoes dominate the skyline of the Pacific Northwest. The familiar snow-clad peaks of the Cascade Range are part of a 1,300 km (800 mi) chain of volcanoes, which extends from northern California to southern British Columbia. The volcanoes are the result of the slow slide of dense oceanic crust as it sinks beneath North America (subduction), which releases water and melts overlying rock. This rich volcanic zone contains the well-known landmark volcanoes and approximately 2,900 other known volcanic features ranging from small cinder cones to substantial shield volcanoes.

Understanding Plate Motions Scientists now have a fairly good understanding of how the plates move and how such movements relate to earthquake activity. Most movement occurs along narrow zones between plates where the results of plate-tectonic forces are most evident. There are four types of plate boundaries: Divergent boundaries -- where new crust is generated as the plates pull away from each other. Virtual Labs The links on this page are all VIRTUAL LABS offered by the Glencoe textbook company. These labs give the students the adventure of laboratory experimentation without costly supplies, worrisome environmental and safety issues, or time-consuming clean up. They are from all different areas of science: Biology, Physics, Genetics, Earth Science, Physical Science, and Chemistry. Please feel free to try these at home! Students will be directed to specific labs in class but there are over 100 labs offered here! To return to the home page, please click here:

Experiment with Magnet Magic Is your child struggling to get a handle on the principles of magnetism? Here's a fun activity to demonstrate polarity and understand the basic principles of magnetism. Before you start, brush up on the properties of magnets to get a feel for the way they work. Properties of Magnets: They attract certain metals All have a north-seeking pole and a south-seeking pole When placed near each other, opposite poles attract and like poles repel PhET Lab: Plate Tectonics Topics Plate Tectonics Crust Lithosphere Mantle Density Buoyancy Earth Science Description Explore how plates move on the surface of the earth. Change temperature, composition, and thickness of plates. Discover how to create new mountains, volcanoes, or oceans!

Electricity and Magnetism - Interactive Java Tutorials: Magnetic Field Lines Magnetic Field Lines Magnets are surrounded by magnetic fields. A magnetic field can be thought of as consisting of lines of force. The forces of magnetic attraction and repulsion move along the lines of force. The magnet below is being placed on a surface containing iron filings. Click ON to simulate the placing of a magnet on a surface covered with iron filings.

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