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Scientists Create Artificial Brain With 2.3 Million Simulated Neurons

Scientists Create Artificial Brain With 2.3 Million Simulated Neurons
Scientists Create Artificial Brain With 2.3 Million Simulated Neurons Another computer is setting its wits to perform human tasks. But this computer is different. Instead of the tour de force processing of Deep Blue or Watson’s four terabytes of facts of questionable utility, Spaun attempts to play by the same rules as the human brain to figure things out. Instead of the logical elegance of a CPU, Spaun’s computations are performed by 2.3 million simulated neurons configured in networks that resemble some of the brain’s own networks. It was given a series of tasks and performed pretty well, taking a significant step toward the creation of a simulated brain. Spaunstands for Semantic Pointer Architecture: Unified Network. Will AI brains of the future look more like Watson or Spaun? And its performance was similar to that of a human brain. The important thing here is not how well Spaun performed on the tasks – your average computer could find ways to perform much better than Spaun.

http://singularityhub.com/2012/12/10/scientists-create-artificial-brain-with-2-3-million-simulated-neurons/

Related:  Building an Artificial BrainA I / Robotics et al.

The Myth Of AI That mythology, in turn, has spurred a reactionary, perpetual spasm from people who are horrified by what they hear. You'll have a figure say, "The computers will take over the Earth, but that's a good thing, because people had their chance and now we should give it to the machines." Then you'll have other people say, "Oh, that's horrible, we must stop these computers." Most recently, some of the most beloved and respected figures in the tech and science world, including Stephen Hawking and Elon Musk, have taken that position of: "Oh my God, these things are an existential threat. They must be stopped."

Like a Swarm of Lethal Bugs: The Most Terrifying Drone Video Yet - Conor Friedersdorf An Air Force simulation says researchers are at work on killer robots so tiny that a group of them could blend into a cityscape. Science writer John Horgan's feature on the many ways drones will be used in coming years is interesting throughout, and terrifying in the passage where he describes an effort to build micro-drones that are, as the U.S. Air Force describes them, "Unobtrusive, pervasive, and lethal." Air Force officials declined a request to observe flight tests at a "micro-aviary" they've built, he reported, but they did let him see a video dramatization "starring micro-UAVs that resemble winged, multi-legged bugs. The drones swarm through alleys, crawl across windowsills, and perch on power lines.

Chapter 3: Neotechnological conditioning Chapter 3 Neotechnological Conditioning – Jean-Marc Mandosio “Reaction against machine-culture. The machine, itself a product of the highest intellectual energies, sets in motion in those who serve it almost nothing but the lower, non-intellectual energies. It thereby releases a vast quantity of energy in general that would otherwise lie dormant, it is true; but it provides no instigation to enhancement, to improvement, to becoming an artist. How to Understand Everything (and why) — Metamodern Too much to know, lots to know about In science and technology, there is a broad and integrative kind of knowledge that can be learned, but isn’t taught. It’s important, though, because it makes creative work more productive and makes costly blunders less likely. Formal education in science and engineering centers on teaching facts and problem-solving skills in a series of narrow topics.

Bernard Stiegler - La société automatique Nous vivons le temps de l’automatisation généralisée. Et dans ce contexte, certains croient pouvoir parler, en particulier aux Etats-Unis, de post-humanisme. A l’horizon de l’automatisation généralisée, se projettent les figures du Cyborg, ou du Golem. Man-Computer Symbiosis Man-Computer Symbiosis J. C. R. Licklider IRE Transactions on Human Factors in Electronics, volume HFE-1, pages 4-11, March 1960 Summary

Marvin Minsky's Home Page MIT Media Lab and MIT AI Lab Professor of Media Arts and Sciences, MIT Professor of E.E.C.S., M.I.Tminsky at media.mit.edu Abstracts Bibliography Biography People Marvin Minsky has made many contributions to AI, cognitive psychology, mathematics, computational linguistics, robotics, and optics. In recent years he has worked chiefly on imparting to machines the human capacity for commonsense reasoning. His conception of human intellectual structure and function is presented in two books: The Emotion Machine and The Society of Mind (which is also the title of the course he teaches at MIT). He received the BA and PhD in mathematics at Harvard (1950) and Princeton (1954).

Two AI Pioneers. Two Bizarre Suicides. What Really Happened? In December 1996, snarky geeks created a newsgroup in his honor, alt.mckinstry.pencil-dick, taking as its charter "Discussion of Usenet kook McKinstry, aka 'McChimp.'" Leading the brigade was Jorn Barger, who would later run the site Robot Wisdom (and coin the term weblog). "You write like a teenager, and have shown frequent signs of extreme cluelessness," Barger emailed McKinstry in May 1995. McKinstry never shied away from a flame war. "I'm just sick of you spouting your highly uninformed opinion all over the net," he replied to Barger.

ChalmersReply Comment on David Chalmers “The Singularity: A Philosophical Analysis” Journal of Consciousness Studies 19(1-2):119-125. 2012. By Robin Hanson, July 1, 2011. Abstract Chalmers is right: we should expect our civilization to, within centuries, have vastly increased mental capacities, surely in total and probably also for individual creatures and devices. We should also expect to see the conflicts he describes between creatures and devices with more versus less capacity. The Scientists Preparing for The Apocalypse The men were too absorbed in their work to notice my arrival at first. Three walls of the conference room held whiteboards densely filled with algebra and scribbled diagrams. One man jumped up to sketch another graph, and three colleagues crowded around to examine it more closely.

Are Artificial Intelligence Doomsayers like Skeptical Theists? - h+ Media Some of you may have noticed my recently-published paper on existential risk and artificial intelligence. The paper offers a somewhat critical perspective on the recent trend for AI-doomsaying among people like Elon Musk, Stephen Hawking and Bill Gates. Of course, it doesn’t focus on their opinions; rather, it focuses on the work of the philosopher Nick Bostrom, who has written the most impressive analysis to date of the potential risks posed by superintelligent machines. I want to try and summarise the main points of that paper in this blog post. This summary comes with the usual caveat that the full version contains more detail and nuance.

A robot prepared for self-awareness: Expanded software architecture for walking robot Hector A year ago, researchers at Bielefeld University showed that their software endowed the walking robot Hector with a simple form of consciousness. Their new research goes a step further: they have now developed a software architecture that could enable Hector to see himself as others see him. "With this, he would have reflexive consciousness," explains Dr. Holk Cruse, professor at the Cluster of Excellence Cognitive Interaction Technology (CITEC) at Bielefeld University. The real reason Elon Musk is scared of A.I. Elon Musk and other big shots in the tech industry are really scared of artificial intelligence. He recently donated $10 million to “an AI research institute earmarked for a global research program aimed at keeping AI beneficial to humanity.” What he and his friends fear is an uncontrollable “demon” as he calls it, one that we would summon ourselves and be unable to bend to our will. He actually refers to the movie Terminator to explain the potential dangers of AI.

Florida pastor plans to convert robots to Christianity Artificial intelligence and autonomous robots should be encouraged to become religious, a US reverend has said. Reverend Christopher Benek, associate pastor of Providence Presbyterian Church in Florida, believes advanced forms of artificial intelligence should be welcomed into the Christian faith. "I don't see Christ's redemption limited to human beings," Benek said in an interview with the futurist Zoltan Istvan. "It's redemption to all of creation, even AI. "If AI is autonomous, then we should encourage it to participate in Christ's redemptive purposes in the world."

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