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Earthbag Building Index

Earthbag Building Index
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Earthbag House Plans - Small, Affordable, Sustainable Natural Building Blog Earthbag Building: The Next Big Thing? Earthbag building has just received engineering approval. This is probably the greatest news ever for earthbag building. You can read more about this exciting breakthrough on our Earthbag Building Blog. For those who don’t know, earthbag structures are constructed with bags of moist soil or other suitable materials, stacked in courses like masonry and then tamped solid. First, let’s take a look at the larger picture to better understand what’s taking place in the natural building movement. Production builders, manufacturers, suppliers and others who profit from modern building materials claim these materials are the easiest to use and most practical. Natural resources, such as oil and gas (which provide the energy needed to convert raw materials into finished goods and transport them), metals and other resources are finite, but the world’s population is growing. … Something has to “give.” Lately, earthbag building has experienced similar growth.

Sustainability Conversations | A Blog by Perrine Bouhana on sustainability leadership, change, engagement & communications Inicio - Superadobe Cal-Earth Earthbag Construction EarthBag Homes - you're standing on the building materials... earthbag home Long sandbags are filled on-site and arranged in layers or as compressed coils. Stabilizers such as cement, lime, or sodium carbonate may be added to an ideal mix of 70% sand, 30% clay. Straw may also be added. The earthbags are then plastered over with adobe. Arquitectura en Equilibrio (Architecture in Balance) flickr.com earthbag home Plastic bags recycled into plastic bags -- if plastic does not break down for a thousand years, this building is sure to last several lifetimes. earthbag construction Foundations differ as per site. earthbag construction The time consuming part, filling the bags. earthbag construction Testing the strength of an arch. earthbag home Project Seres, Guatemala. projectseres.org, flickr.com earthbag home CalEarth -- Emergency Shelter Village, Hesperia, California. earthbag home Cal Earth -- Emergency Shelters. earthbag home CalEarth let the layers show. Resources: Lessons: More Pictures:

Triple Dome Survival Shelter « Earthbag House Plans April 12, 2011 by Owen Geiger Triple Dome Survival Shelter (click to enlarge) Specifications: Three 16′ interior diameter domes with 603 sq. ft. interior, 3 sleeping lofts with 312 sq. ft., total 915 sq. ft. interior, one bedroom, one bath, Footprint: 38′ x 38′ Description: This Triple Dome Survival Shelter provides much more space than my first earthbag survival shelter. Like this: Like Loading... MIT Unveils Flexible Solar Cells Printed on Paper We’ve seen several different examples of printable solar cells in the past, however MIT engineers just unveiled a new type of cell that can be printed onto paper or fabric. The flexible photovoltaic cells are not energy intensive to produce and they can be folded over 1,000 times without any loss of performance. The technology was officially published today in the journal Advanced Materials by Professor of Electrical Engineering Vladimir Bulović and several other students. Instead of creating solar cells by exposing substrates to liquids or high temperatures, the team has developed a process that can produce solar cells on ordinary paper or cloth using ‘gentle’ conditions. The solar cells are formed by placing five layers of material onto a single sheet of paper in successive passes. A mask is utilized to form the cell patterns, and the entire printing process is done in a vacuum chamber. “We have demonstrated quite thoroughly the robustness of this technology,” Bulović says.

Earth house | Natural Building Article about the history of earthbag building A Short History of Earthbag Building by Kelly Hart The idea of making walls by stacking bags of sand or earth has been around for at least a century. Originally sand bags were used for flood control and military bunkers because they are easy to transport to where they need to be used, fast to assemble, inexpensive, and effective at their task of warding off both water and bullets. At first natural materials such as burlap were used to manufacture the bags; more recently woven polypropylene has become the preferred material because of its superior strength. The burlap will actually last a bit longer if subjected to sunlight, but it will eventually rot if left damp, whereas polypropylene is unaffected by moisture. Because of this history of military and flood control, the use of sandbags has generally been associated with the construction of temporary structures or barriers. 1978, a prototype house using an earthquake-proof stacked-bag type of construction was built in Guatemala.

Step-by-Step Earthbag Building This Instructable explains each main step of construction for building vertical earthbag walls. Videos on my Earthbag Natural Building YouTube channel demonstrate the process. For those who don’t know, earthbag building uses polypropylene rice bags or feed bags filled with soil or insulation that are stacked like masonry and tamped flat. Barbed wire between courses keeps bags from slipping and adds tensile strength. The final plastered walls look just like adobe structures. Thousands of people are now building with bags to create their dream homes, home offices, shops, resorts, rootcellars, storm cellars and survival shelters. I got involved with earthbag building when the Indian Ocean tsunami hit Southeast Asia in December, 2004. Our websites at EarthbagBuilding.com and Earthbag Building Blog explain just about everything you need to know for free.

Slow Communities Tiny Earthbag Homes = Low Cost To Build And Own Earthbag homes can take on many different sizes and shapes such as straight walls or curved. The roof can also be made of earthbag but only for smaller structures. Green roofs and timber roofs are also often used. It’s possible that an earthbag home could be used for folks interested in living small. Once you own land in a no codes / no restrictions area, you have some flexibility to do such a neat build.

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