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Bamboo Architecture Collection

Bamboo Architecture Collection
This collection of buildings lets you into the natural aesthetic beauty of bamboo architecture. Bamboo is one of the fastest-growing plants on Earth with reported growth rates of 100 cm in 24 hours. This eco-friendly material has the same technical performance as timber, concrete and steel constructions, but has a much lower carbon footprint. It is one of the most versatile and flexible materials and has regenerative properties. Get yourself inspired!

http://openbuildings.com/collections/bamboo-architecture-collection-102929

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Talks to Elora Hardy, Founder of Ibuku, About the Creative and Sustainable Potential of Bamboo We’ve showcased numerous bamboo designs over the years, from furniture to entire buildings, but when it comes to combining green building and renewable materials, Ibuku’s incredible bent-bamboo buildings take the cake. The Bali-based bamboo building team already has luxury villas, houses, schools and infrastructure buildings in their portfolio, and is renowned for their dedication to using traditional Indonesian building techniques. We spoke with the firm’s founder and CEO, designer Elora Hardy, about vernacular architecture traditions, her involvement with designing bamboo buildings, and the reasons behind her vocational change from high-end fashion to sustainable architecture

Bamboo, Wattle & Daub Yurt Posted by Jeffrey | Posted in Earthen Yurt | Posted on 23-06-2012 Tags: aprovecho, bamboo, daub, earthen, kiko denzer, natual building, reciprocal roof, wattle, wattle and daub, yurt Project led by: Kiko Denzer Location: Aprovecho, Cottage Grove, OR Date: August 2012 This earthen yurt was built as part of the ‘sustainable shelter series’ at Aprovecho. The yurt is made from site harvested bamboo, lashed together using recycled bailers twine. Building with Bamboo It’s 100% natural, thrives in diverse climates, grows up to a whopping 39 inches per day and is super-strong; why isn’t bamboo already used more often as a building material? While bamboo structures have long been common in Asia and the South Pacific, they’re only just gaining prominence in the rest of the world. From schools to disaster shelters, these 13 bamboo buildings prove just how strong, durable, eco-friendly and visually pleasing this perennial evergreen grass can be. Water and Wind Cafe, Vietnam

L’Observatoire L’observatoire is a project by clp architects, realized for a competition, consisted on proposing a pavilion of 20 m2 floor space to be constructed in a protected natural area in Muttersholtz, Alsace. The architects first intention was to create a building that could offer an experience of varied possibilities, using the least materials and formal recourses. This intention has been translated into a structural system that performs various tasks: the possibility of light, shadow, ventilation and also to provide temporal storage space. The second intention was to conceive an architecture that could enhance and diversify the relationship between the visitor of the pavilion and the surrounding environment. The pavilion, then, performs as a medium that is both reduced and enhanced into an optical device. In an economic sense, the structure permits an open-plan interior, similar to a theatre stage: The interior space is reconstructed again and again with each visitor.

The Green School Showcases The Incredible Potential of Bamboo Construction in Indonesia The Green School was established side-by-side with the non-profit Meranggi Foundation, which develops bamboo plantations by presenting seedlings to local rice farmers. The project also harnessed the talents of PT Bambu, an architecture firm specializing in bamboo architecture. PT Bambu is responsible for the bamboo portion of the Green School’s campus, which consists of four classrooms, a drop-off center, faculty housing, offices, cafes, bathrooms, a gym, and the Heart of the School, a spiraling, multi-story building for school functions. Along with the beautiful bamboo construction, the eco-school’s curriculum focuses on sustainability and offers many scholarships to local Balinese children. The campus also includes an organic garden and utilizes a number of renewable energy systems, including a bamboo sawdust hot water and cooking system, a hydro-powered vortex generator, and solar panels.

Bamboo Vacation Home Casa Atrevida Casa Atrevida is a luxurious bamboo vacation home located on Preciosa Beach in Costa Rica. The 240 m2 house is primarily build with Guadua Bamboo and Teak and is earthquake and flood resistant. It was constructed in 2011 and features 5 bedrooms, 5 bathrooms, and can host up to 10 guests. Casa Atrevida floats about one meter above the ground on concrete pillars and is build this way to protect it from river floods and excessive rain during the wet season. The house is divided into two parts, each with two floors and an open corridor that connects the two segments. Guadua Bamboo dominates the design, being used both for decorative purposes and as a structural material.

Bamboo shoots up in Eastern Cape Details 05 December 2011 Bamboo cultivation and its use in products ranging from furniture to biofuel and baskets, is set to take off in the Eastern Cape province. (Image: Wikimedia ) Tour This Incredible Green Village in Bali of All-Bamboo Homes, Crafted By Ibuku Ibuku (formerly called PTBambu), a design-build firm located outside of Bali’s cultural center of Ubud, is the visionary behind both the Green School and the Green Village. So far one home in the community has been built and is a spiraling canopy of bamboo set amidst the lush jungle above the river. Everything is made from bamboo, from the window frames to the staircase, tables, chairs, floors, and even the cabinets and the walls. The amazing craftsmanship in this home exemplifies what is possible with the fast-growing, renewable material. Green Village is within walking distance of the Green School and is built with the same principles of sustainability. “Our view on being green comes out of being logical, doing no harm and being conscientious,” says Elora Hardy, Creative Director of the Ibuku bamboo company.

Bamboo Buildings Bamboo Buildings Grow it, build with it. Phyllostachys aurea, Tetragonoclamus angulatus, Phyllostachys nigra f. punctuata,Phyllostaches bamb. violascens, Phyllostachys nigra f. 'Boryana',Phyllostachys viridis'Sulphurea', Phyllostachys bambusoides. (Illustration Photo by Wetterwald M.F.) Mason Lane Farm Equipment Building, Goshen, Kentucky made from locally grown bamboo by De Leon & Primmer Architecture Workshop, deleon-primmer.com

Chiangmai Life Construction By Markus Roselieb Ancient Technique Rammed earth dates back thousands of years. Many European castles and the Great Wall of China were built using this technology. As the name implies, rammed earth construction involves the use of compressed earth. A mixture of earth consisting of the right amount of sand, gravel and clay is poured into a mould or formwork. Artist Weaves Together Massive Basket-like Bamboo Tunnel for Australian Music Festival A big challenge at music festivals is finding shelter from the heat and sun, but a sprawling bamboo art installation gave attendees at last year's Woodwork Folk Festival plenty of shade to stand under. Taiwanese sculptor Wang Wen-Chih teamed up with the Sydney-based architecture and design-collective Cave Urban to create Woven Sky, a 300-foot-long shaded tunnel and tower installation in Woodford, Australia. Woven together from locally harvested bamboo and radiata pine logs, the sprawling tunnel took 40 workers and volunteers three weeks to build. Located north of Brisbane, the Woodford Folk Festival is an annual music festival that celebrates a wide variety of music genres for six days and six nights. Built as the entrance to the festival’s main amphitheater, Woven Sky was constructed from materials that Wen-Chih and the architects harvested within a 12-mile radius of the site. The final installation stretches 300 feet long and nearly 50 feet tall.

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