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23 maps and charts on language

23 maps and charts on language
by Dylan Matthews on April 15, 2015 "The limits of my language," the philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein once posited, "mean the limits of my world." Explaining everything within the limits of the world is probably too ambitious a goal for a list like this. But here are 23 maps and charts that can hopefully illuminate small aspects of how we manage to communicate with one another. The basics Indo-European language rootsMinna Sundberg, a Finnish-Swedish comic artist, created this beautiful tree to illustrate both the relationships between European and central Asian languages generally, as well as a smaller but still striking point: Finnish has less in common with, say, Swedish than Persian or Hindi do. Language divides Bilingualism Who in Europe speaks EnglishMany countries have more than one commonly used language, with many residents learning two or more. English American English

http://www.vox.com/2014/11/17/7082317/language-maps-charts

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The Geography of Empathy and Apathy Compassion is tricky. Solidarity is a minefield. Did you add the French tricolour to your Facebook profile picture? If not, are you a heartless bastard, or worse, an apologist for the terrorists who killed over 120 innocent civilians in Paris? Daniel Quinn: The Great Forgetting (Excerpted from the book, The Story of B) With every audience and every individual, I have to begin by making them see that the cultural self-awareness we inherit from our parents and pass on to our children is squarely and solidly built on a Great Forgetting that occurred in our culture worldwide during the formative millennia of our civilization. What happened during those formative millennia of our civilization?

Divine words: what role does language learning play in religious practice? “Silence is the language of God, all else is poor translation,” Sufi mystic Rumi once said. Words are, however, a way for the worldly to connect with the divine through prayer and worship. For many, developing a greater understanding of a religion extends not only to studying the theological and philosophical points but to learning another language. We spoke to three people studying Arabic, Hebrew and classical Tibetan about the role languages play in their relationship with religion. Hebrew and Judaism

Maps of US linguistic patterns Joshua Katz has been studying American dialects and has made more than 120 maps of some of the differences in American speech. Here are a few examples: (thx, everyone) Update: As he notes on the site, Katz's maps are based on the research and work of Bert Vaux...Vaux's maps of the same data can be found here. How Much Land the Federal Government Owns Will Surprise You The rough beauty of the American West seems as far as you can get from the polished corridors of power in Washington DC. Until you look at the title to the land. The federal government owns large tracts of the western states: from a low of 29.9% in Montana, already more than the national average, up to a whopping 84.5% in Nevada. This map, depicting the distribution and share of federal land per state, was first published on this blog way back in 2008. Nevertheless, it keeps accumulating comments and hits at a steady pace, and is still frequently shared around. Unlike hundreds of other random maps, this one has become a perennial.

Ten Amazing Inventions From Ancient Times Dating back thousands of years are numerous examples of ancient technology that leave us awe-struck at the knowledge and wisdom held by people of our past. They were the result of incredible advances in engineering and innovation as new, powerful civilizations emerged and came to dominate the ancient world. These advances stimulated societies to adopt new ways of living and governance, as well as new ways of understanding their world. How the language you speak changes your view of the world This article was written by Panos Athanasopoulos from Lancaster University. It was originally published by The Conversation. Bilinguals get all the perks. Better job prospects, a cognitive boost and even protection against dementia.

Phonological Atlas of North America at the Linguistics Laboratory,University of Pennsylvania [Regional Maps] [Staff] [Sampling Methods] [Links] [Maps] [Feedback] The Telsur Project is a survey of linguistic changes in progress in North American English, supported by the National Science Foundation and the National Endowment for the Humanities. It is the creator of the Atlas of North American English [ANAE], (formerly, the Phonological Atlas of North America). The Atlas will be published in 2005 by Mouton/de Gruyter. It will be accompanied by a CD-ROM version developed by a team headed by Prof. The Obsessively Detailed Map of American Literature's Most Epic Road Trips The above map is the result of a painstaking and admittedly quixotic effort to catalog the country as it has been described in the American road-tripping literature. It includes every place-name reference in 12 books about cross-country travel, from Mark Twain’s Roughing It (1872) to Cheryl Strayed’s Wild (2012), and maps the authors’ routes on top of one another. You can track an individual writer’s descriptions of the landscape as they traveled across it, or you can zoom in to see how different authors have written about the same place at different times. Most interestingly of all, for me at least, you can ruminate about what those differences say about American travel, American writing, American history. A word to close readers: I hand-typed most of these 1,500-plus entries and located their coordinates as best I could. Some were difficult to track down.

Human species 'may split in two' Humanity may split into two sub-species in 100,000 years' time as predicted by HG Wells, an expert has said. Evolutionary theorist Oliver Curry of the London School of Economics expects a genetic upper class and a dim-witted underclass to emerge. The human race would peak in the year 3000, he said - before a decline due to dependence on technology. People would become choosier about their sexual partners, causing humanity to divide into sub-species, he added. Save Time by Prioritizing and Letting Go of Tasks~Time-Saving Tips for Teache... Truth: it will never all get done. If you are a teacher you will never EVER be the proud owner of a blank to do list. It simply is not possible. Words matter in ‘ISIS’ war, so use ‘Daesh’ The militants who are killing civilians, raping and forcing captured women into sexual slavery, and beheading foreigners in Iraq and Syria are known by several names: the Islamic State in Iraq and al-Sham, or ISIS; the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant, or ISIL; and, more recently, the Islamic State, or IS. French officials recently declared that that country would stop using any of those names and instead refer to the group as “Daesh.” The Obama Administration should switch to this nomenclature, too, because how we talk about this group is central to defeating them.

Types of Linguistic Maps: The Mapping of linguistic Features and Researcher Interactivity This post is a open draft! It was originally started on April 23, 2011. Almost two years later it makes it's public debut. It might be updated at any time... But was last updated on December 18, 2013 at 8:41 pm. A couple of years ago I had a chance meeting with a cartographer in North Dakota. Have You Heard of The Great Forgetting? It Happened 10,000 Years Ago & Completely Affects Your Life By Deep Ecology Hub / deep-ecology-hub.com This article summarizes the ideas of Daniel Quinn, first written about in The Story of B, which was a sequel to Ishmael. The longer, original essay can be read here, and comes highly recommended, especially if you find yourself disagreeing with the summary below. Most disagreements we've read about have turned out to be misunderstandings, so please check the original before coming to conclusions.

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