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A Liberal Decalogue: Bertrand Russell's 10 Commandments of Teaching

A Liberal Decalogue: Bertrand Russell's 10 Commandments of Teaching
by Maria Popova “Do not fear to be eccentric in opinion, for every opinion now accepted was once eccentric.” British philosopher, mathematician, historian, and social critic Bertrand Russell (May 18, 1872–February 2, 1970) endures as one of the most intellectually diverse and influential thinkers in modern history, his philosophy of religion in particular having shaped the work of such modern atheism champions as Christopher Hitchens, Daniel Dennett, and Richard Dawkins. From the third volume of The Autobiography of Bertrand Russell: 1944-1969 comes this remarkable micro-manifesto, entitled A Liberal Decalogue (public library) — a vision for responsibilities of a teacher, in which Russell touches on a number of recurring themes from pickings past — the purpose of education, the value of uncertainty, the importance of critical thinking, the gift of intelligent criticism, and more. The Autobiography of Bertrand Russell is a treasure trove of wisdom in its entirety — highly recommended.

http://www.brainpickings.org/2012/05/02/a-liberal-decalogue-bertrand-russell/

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