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Why teach/what is teaching

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Alex Corbitt on Twitter: "Profile of a Modern Teacher □ (by @wayfaringpath) #sunchat #edchat #engchat #elearning... What I Wish I'd Known as a New Teacher. It's been two decades since my first year in the clasroom. I reflect on that time and wish I'd known a few things about myself, about teaching, and about my students. Some of what I wish I'd known could have been shared with me -- some I just had to live and learn from. So I offer this reflection both for new teachers as well as for those who support them. And so if you work with a new teacher, I'm hoping you might stop by their room in the next few days and share some insights from your own experience.

And if you are a new teacher, then I'm hoping these reflections might help you feel validated, hopeful, and resourceful. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. As a new teacher you need a lot of feedback and support. The first year (like a first love) has so many highs and lows and I still get both dreamy-eyed and panicky when I remember the 1995-96 school year. A veteran teacher turned coach shadows 2 students for 2 days – a sobering lesson learned. The following account comes from a veteran HS teacher who just became a Coach in her building.

Because her experience is so vivid and sobering I have kept her identity anonymous. But nothing she describes is any different than my own experience in sitting in HS classes for long periods of time. And this report of course accords fully with the results of our student surveys. I have made a terrible mistake. I waited fourteen years to do something that I should have done my first year of teaching: shadow a student for a day. It was so eye-opening that I wish I could go back to every class of students I ever had right now and change a minimum of ten things – the layout, the lesson plan, the checks for understanding.

This is the first year I am working in a school but not teaching my own classes; I am the High School Learning Coach, a new position for the school this year. My class schedules for the day(Note: we have a block schedule; not all classes meet each day): 7:45 – 9:15: Geometry Wow. Share This With All the Schools, Please. A few weeks ago, I went into Chase’s class for tutoring. I’d emailed Chase’s teacher one evening and said, “Chase keeps telling me that this stuff you’re sending home is math – but I’m not sure I believe him. Help, please.” She emailed right back and said, “No problem! I can tutor Chase after school anytime.” And I said, “No, not him. I stood a little shakily at the chalkboard while Chase’s teacher sat behind me, perched on her desk, using a soothing voice to try to help me understand the “new way we teach long division.”

Afterwards, we sat for a few minutes and talked about teaching children and what a sacred trust and responsibility it is. And then she told me this. Every Friday afternoon Chase’s teacher asks her students to take out a piece of paper and write down the names of four children with whom they’d like to sit the following week. Who is not getting requested by anyone else? Who doesn’t even know who to request? Who never gets noticed enough to be nominated? Good Lord. Rita Pierson: Every kid needs a champion.

What Students Remember Most About Teachers | Pursuit of a Joyful Life. Dear Young Teacher Down the Hall, I saw you as you rushed past me in the lunch room. Urgent. In a hurry to catch a bite before the final bell would ring calling all the students back inside. I noticed that your eyes showed tension. There were faint creases in your forehead.

And I asked you how your day was going and you sighed. “Oh, fine,” you replied. But I knew it was anything but fine. You told me how busy you were, how much there was to do. I told you to remember that at the end of the day, it’s not about the lesson plan. And as I looked at you there wearing all that worry under all that strain, I said it’s about being there for your kids. No, they’ll not remember that amazing decor you’ve designed. But they will remember you. Your kindness. Because at the end of the day, what really matters is YOU. You are that difference in their lives. Because we want our students to think we’re the very best at what we do and we believe that this status of excellence is achieved merely by doing.

10 pieces of advice for new teachers. In just a few short weeks new teachers around the world will embark upon an exciting and crazy adventure. This adventure will surely have its fair share of ups and downs. In spite of that, this adventure will allow for countless opportunities to serve and positively impact current and future generations of students.

This adventure will be like no other adventure... Here are 10 pieces of advice I'd like to share with new teachers as they prepare for this adventure: 1). Strong student relationships will be your best friend. 2). 3). 4). 5). 6). 7). 8). 9). 10). Good luck and enjoy this wonderful adventure... we've been waiting for you! What Most People Don't Know About Teachers. Photo Credit: mrsdkrebs via Compfight cc As a student I couldn’t even guess what my teachers were doing when they weren’t teaching. Mostly because I did not care enough to pay attention. Sure, I knew the impact some of my teachers and coaches had on me, but the teenage mind didn’t allow me to comprehend what a teacher does all day. Flash forward a few years and I had the itch.

My experience in Swaziland working with youth led me down the path of education. Now I stand at the other end of the teaching spectrum. 1. Teachers plan year round (yes, especially in the summer). 2. Teachers care like crazy. 3. Come into a school and you’ll see teachers working together, planning lessons, talking through curriculum points, and creating projects. 4. We spend hours decorating, organizing, and making our classroom a perfect learning environment. 5. We continue to learn both formally and informally as we grow as professionals. 6. 7. Why Teaching Is Like Farming.

Sometimes, I think that teaching is a lot like farming. I know that statement won’t immediately convince most of you, but sometimes, you need to think of yourself as a farmer. Reap, Sow This principle is as old as time. It is fair to say that farming was one of the first professions. Farmers understood very early on about the relationship between the seeds and the plants. A tomato seed results in tomato plant!. Likewise, the transformation, or lack there of, is directly related to the seeds of work and wisdom we put into our students’ minds. A Lack of Control Nature eludes stretchable human intellect and ever increasing power of control.

The Results Are Not Immediate A single visit to any grocery store might make us believe that there is nothing like seasonal produce. The 1:1 Ratio Doesn’t Exist Farming is purposeless if we reaped 1:1 for the seeds we sow. Constant Attention A good farmer spends most of his day tending to his plants. How Teaching Is Changing: 15 Examples.

How Teaching Is Changing: 15 New Realities Every Educator Faces by Terry Heick It’s tempting to say that no matter how much technology pushes on education, every teacher will always need to know iconic teacher practices like assessment, curriculum design, classroom management, and cognitive coaching. This may end up being true–how education changes in the next 20 years is a choice rather than the inevitable tidal wave of social and technological change it’s easy to sit back and wait for. Think of the very limited change in education since 2000 compared to the automotive industry, computer industry, retail consumer industry, etc. But it’s probably going to be a bit different than that.

We’ve written before about the kinds of “things” modern teachers must be able to do. (Hint: It’s no longer about classroom management, testing, and content delivery.) 1. The Old: Administer assessment, evaluate performance, report performance, then–maybe–make crude adjustments the best you can 2. Summary 3. 4. If I Knew Then: A Letter to Me on My First Day Teaching. What Students Really Need to Hear | affectiveliving. It’s 4 a.m. I’ve struggled for the last hour to go to sleep. But, I can’t. Yet again, I am tossing and turning, unable to shut down my brain. Why? This is what students really need to hear: First, you need to know right now that I care about you. Here’s the thing: I lose sleep because of you.

Before I tell you why, you should understand the truth about school. The main event is learning how to deal with the harshness of life when it gets difficult — how to overcome problems as simple as a forgotten locker combination, to obnoxious peers, to gossip, to people doubting you, to asking for help in the face of self-doubt, to pushing yourself to concentrate when a million other thoughts and temptations are fingertips away. It is your resilience in conquering the main event — adversity — that truly prepares you for life after school. But, you shouldn’t be worried about the fact that you will face great adversities. Some of you quit by skipping class on your free education. . – C. Like this: Too Many Teachers Leave Before Hitting Their Stride. Too Many Teachers Leave Before Hitting Their Stride by Paul Barnwell, Teacher of English & Digital Media According to University of Pennsylvania professor Richard Ingersoll, between 40 and 50 percent of teachers leave the classroom within their first five years.

Given the demands of the job, this isn’t too surprising, and his data reveals a steady uptick in teacher attrition and increasing numbers of new hires over the past two decades. It can takes years for educators to build confidence, an array of classroom management skills, and the ability to effectively assess student learning, among other demands, which is why early exodus from the profession is highly problematic for the education system as a whole–nobody wins if we can’t find and retain quality teachers in every small town and county school district, sprawling suburban schools, and challenging urban schools. 80% First Semester First-year teachers should not work a full day.

Emphasize More Varied Forms of Data Hybrid Opportunities. The Real Number Of Hours Teachers Work In One Eye-Opening Graphic. What Students Remember Most About Teachers | Lori Gard. Dear Young Teacher Down the Hall, I saw you as you rushed passed me in the lunch room. Urgent. In a hurry to catch a bite before the final bell would ring calling all the students back inside. I noticed that your eyes showed tension.

There were faint creases in your forehead. And I asked you how your day was going and you sighed. "Oh, fine," you replied. But I knew it was anything but fine. You told me how busy you were, how much there was to do. I told you to remember that at the end of the day, it's not about the lesson plan. And as I looked at you there wearing all that worry under all that strain, I said it's about being there for your kids. No, they'll not remember that amazing decor you've designed. But they will remember you. Your kindness. Because at the end of the day, what really matters is YOU. You are that difference in their lives. Because we want our students to think we're the very best at what we do and we believe that this status of excellence is achieved merely by doing. Why Do Teachers Teach? 20,000 Teachers Tell Us.