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Dan Gilbert: The psychology of your future self

Dan Gilbert: The psychology of your future self
Dan Gilbert: The psychology of your future self "Human beings are works in progress that mistakenly think they're finished." Dan Gilbert shares recent research on a phenomenon he calls the "end of history illusion," where we somehow imagine that the person we are right now is the person we'll be for the rest of time. Hint: that's not the case. This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

http://www.ted.com/talks/dan_gilbert_you_are_always_changing

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