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Our Documents - Home

Teacher Resources The Library of Congress offers classroom materials and professional development to help teachers effectively use primary sources from the Library's vast digital collections in their teaching. Find Library of Congress lesson plans and more that meet Common Core standards, state content standards, and the standards of national organizations. Discover and discuss ways to bring the power of Library of Congress primary sources into the classroom. Go to the blog Subscribe to the blog via e-mail or RSS. Using Primary Sources Discover quick and easy ways to begin using primary sources in your classroom, with teachers' guides, information on citing sources and copyright, and the Library's primary source analysis tool. TPS Partners The Teaching with Primary Sources Program builds partnerships with educational organizations to support effective instruction using primary sources. The Teaching with Primary Sources Journal

Constitution Day: An Opportunity for Empowering Students to Think Critically Chip Somodevilla/Getty ImagesLaird Monahan walking up the steps of the Lincoln Memorial past a giant banner printed with the Preamble to the United States Constitution during a demonstration against the Supreme Court’s Citizens United ruling on Oct. 20, 2010.Go to related 2010 blog post » Sept. 17 is Constitution Day, the day when the writers at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia signed the United States Constitution in 1787. Dust is far from gathering on this 225-year-old document, however (not least because it is preserved in the highly protected, temperature-regulated National Archives case): The Constitution influences our lives, schools and government every single day. Each school day is an opportunity to make the Constitution relevant in your classroom by empowering students to research big questions, think critically, defend their arguments with evidence and speak their opinions with the protections that the Constitution entitles us. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Teaching With Documents Skip Navigation. Teachers Home > Teachers' Resources > Teaching With Documents Lessons by Era More Lesson Plan Resources Primary Source Research & Classroom Resources DocsTeachFind and create interactive learning activities with primary source documents that promote historical thinking skills. Analysis Worksheets Teaching With Documents: Lesson Plans This section contains reproducible copies of primary documents from the holdings of the National Archives of the United States, teaching activities correlated to the National History Standards and National Standards for Civics and Government, and cross-curricular connections. Teaching with primary documents encourages a varied learning environment for teachers and students alike. PDF files require the free Adobe Reader. Teachers > Connect With Us Primary Sources DocsTeach Visits & Workshops Other Resources

Democracy Web | Welcome to Democracy Web CARRIE: An Electronic Library Reference Special Collections belonging to the Carrie network: AMDOCS: Documents for the Study of American History EuroDocs: Primary Historical Documents From Western Europe maintained by Richard Hacken at Brigham Young University's Harold B. Lee Library, links to Western European (mainly primary) historical documents that are transcribed, reproduced in facsimile, or translated. Jon J. 128 Civics Questions and Answers with MP3 Audio (2020 version) Listed below are the 128 civics questions and answers with audio files for the 2020 version of the civics test. These questions cover important topics about American government and history. The civics test is an oral test and the USCIS officer will ask you to answer 20 out of the 128 civics test questions. You must answer at least 12 questions (or 60%) correctly to pass the 2020 version of the civics test. On the civics test, some answers may change because of elections or appointments. Although USCIS is aware that there may be additional correct answers to the civics questions, applicants are encouraged to respond to the questions using the answers provided below. 65/20 Special Consideration If you are 65 years old or older and have been living in the United States as a lawful permanent resident of the United States for 20 or more years, you may study just the 20 questions that have been marked with an asterisk (*) found at the end of each question. A: Principles of American Government

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