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Web 2.0 Expo NY: Clay Shirky (shirky.com) It's Not Information Overload. It's Filter Failure.

Web 2.0 Expo NY: Clay Shirky (shirky.com) It's Not Information Overload. It's Filter Failure.
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Know Your Sources When doing research you will come across a lot of information from different types of sources. How do you decide which source to use? From tweets to newspaper articles, this tool provides a brief description of each and breaks down 6 factors of what to consider when selecting a source. A platform for millions of very short messages on a variety of topics that enables brief dialogue between distinct groups of people across geographic, political, cultural and economic boundaries. An avenue for sharing both developed and unpolished ideas and interests with a niche community with relative ease. A collection of millions of educational, inspirational, eye-opening and entertaining videos that are shared rapidly and widely. A reporting and recording of cultural and political happenings that keeps the general public informed of daily events, sports, and current news. A book in which the information presented is supported by clearly identified sources. Total Number Published per Day Time in review

Steve Rosenbaum: MySpace is Reborn as Social Curation First look at the New MySpace promises changes in design -- embraces community knowledge and passion. Today MySpace is reborn as a content centric discovery platform. It's a big shift, and it might just work. First, there's a new look. But pretty much everyone agrees that a new coat of paint isn't going to bring the site back from the wilderness. Far more interesting is the wholesale change underlying the editorial thinking of the site. There's one word that sums up the new MySpace says Music Chief Courtney Holt: "Curation." "When I look at the word curation I think what's interesting to me is that everybody can be a curator." As Mike Jones, CEO of MySpace explains: "Myspace is unique in that it is powered by the passions of our users, who program the site by expressing interests, sharing tastes and knowledge around particular topics, and scouting out up-and-coming subcultures." In the past, MySpace music's editorial process was much like many media companies. Why does it matter?

Microsoft Word’s Notebook View: A new way students note take in the classroom Historically, Microsoft Word has been the most popular word-processing program among computer users. Users for this program range from business professionals writing important documents to undergraduate students writing a term paper to writers working on their next big story. Almost anyone can find a way to use Microsoft Word. However, for Mac computer users, Microsoft Word provides another feature that can be useful for students: the Notebook View. The Notebook View The Notebook View in Word visually looks like a notebook, with tabs on the side to split up notes in one document file. Using Notebook View for written notes Diane Bui, a junior business major with a minor in early education, acknowledges she is a disorganized person. “I found it very convenient to take notes on, as the subjects of the class or even different classes can be easily divided yet all in the same document,” Bui said. “I love how easily you can create tabs and sections to continue the document,” Bui said. More Posts

Why Social Media Curation Matters - Technorati Blogging Over the past few weeks I've raved about the current raft of social media curation start-ups. I've rambled on and on about all of the new features that are being added to sites like Curated.By, Storify and Keepstream. What I haven’t explained to my friends, family, Twitter followers and just about anybody I engage in tech conversation with for more than a couple of minutes, is why it all matters. With registered Twitter users numbering somewhere in the region of 150 million, their fire hose is pumping out tens of millions of tweets a day. Granted, not all of this data is worth capturing. So, how do you decide what’s worth keeping?

2b or not 2b: David Crystal on why texting is good for language Last year, in a newspaper article headed "I h8 txt msgs: How texting is wrecking our language", John Humphrys argued that texters are "vandals who are doing to our language what Genghis Khan did to his neighbours 800 years ago. They are destroying it: pillaging our punctuation; savaging our sentences; raping our vocabulary. And they must be stopped." As a new variety of language, texting has been condemned as "textese", "slanguage", a "digital virus". According to John Sutherland of University College London, writing in this paper in 2002, it is "bleak, bald, sad shorthand. Ever since the arrival of printing - thought to be the invention of the devil because it would put false opinions into people's minds - people have been arguing that new technology would have disastrous consequences for language. The slow start, it seems, was because the companies had trouble working out reliable ways of charging for the new service. ("Too wise you are . . .") The wet rustle of rain can dampen today.

Curation And The Human Web... Posted by Tom Foremski - November 16, 2010 There is no doubt in my mind that the topic of curation and the Internet, is an important one and that it will be a dominant topic in 2011. Curation is important because we are reaching the limits of what can be achieved through algorithms and machines in organizing and navigating the Internet. Aggregation looks like curation but it's not. I define curation as a person, or a group of people, engaged in choosing and presenting a collection of things related to a specific topic and context. Aggregation employs software (algorithms) and machines (servers) to assemble a collection of things related to a specific topic and context. Aggregation tools can be employed by curators but the human act of curation adds a layer of value that aggregation alone cannot provide. A good example is Techmeme, the news aggregator run by Gabe Rivera. Techmeme uses an algorithm to find and publish links to the most important tech news of the day.

The Big List of Class Discussion Strategies Listen to this article as a podcast episode: Podcast: Play in new window | Download (Duration: 38:22 — 53.1MB) Subscribe: iTunes | Android | When I worked with student teachers on developing effective lesson plans, one thing I always asked them to revise was the phrase “We will discuss.” We will discuss the video. We will discuss the story. We will discuss our results. Every time I saw it in a lesson plan, I would add a note: “What format will you use? The problem wasn’t them; in most of the classrooms where they’d sat as students, that’s exactly what a class discussion looked like. So here they are: 15 formats for structuring a class discussion to make it more engaging, more organized, more equitable, and more academically challenging. I’ve separated the strategies into three groups. Enjoy! Gallery Walk > a.k.a. Basic Structure: Stations or posters are set up around the classroom, on the walls or on tables. Philosophical Chairs > a.k.a. Pinwheel Discussion > Socratic Seminar > a.k.a. a.k.a.

Bit.ly Bundles Now Allow Hyper Personalized Wikis: Tech News « Bit.ly, the URL link-shortener, took a turn last month into content curation with Bundles, its tool for packaging and preserving multiple links. Today the company is opening up the tool for collaboration among users, allowing people to share and create collections of relevant information as people seek to sort through the crush of content online. Now people who create a bundle can add new editors, who can contribute toward a shared bundle. The bundles are like a more personal and lightweight versions of a Wikipedia page but with the same ability to be a lasting resource for others when shared. At a simple level, it can be a list of links for recipes shared among friends or sports highlights built among fans of a particular team. Bit.ly has found that the bundles are being used in some interesting ways. Bundles highlights the growing interest in content curation, as users look for ways to cut through and organize the jumble of data online. Related GigaOM Pro content (sub req’d):

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