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The crayola-fication of the world: How we gave colors names, and it messed with our brains (part I)

The crayola-fication of the world: How we gave colors names, and it messed with our brains (part I)
“Who in the rainbow can draw the line where the violet tint ends and the orange tint begins? Distinctly we see the difference of the colors, but where exactly does the one first blendingly enter into the other? So with sanity and insanity.”—Herman Melville, Billy Budd Spectral Rhythm. Screen Print by Scott Campbell. In Japan, people often refer to traffic lights as being blue in color. Blue and green are similar in hue. One of the first fences in this color continuum came from an unlikely place – crayons. Reconstructing the rainbow. In modern Japanese, midori is the word for green, as distinct from blue. And it’s not just Japanese. (Update: Some clarifications here. I find this fascinating, because it highlights a powerful idea about how we might see the world. Imagine that you had a rainbow-colored piece of paper that smoothly blends from one color to the other. A map of color for an English speaker. But if you think about it, there’s a real puzzle here. And here’s what they found.

http://www.wired.com/2012/06/the-crayola-fication-of-the-world-how-we-gave-colors-names-and-it-messed-with-our-brains-part-i/

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The Brink of Oblivion: Inside Nazi-Occupied Poland, 1939-1940 In the late 1930s and early 1940s, a German photographer and ardent Nazi named Hugo Jaeger enjoyed unprecedented access to the Third Reich’s upper echelon, traveling with Adolf Hitler to massive rallies and photographing him at intimate parties and in quieter, private moments. The photos made such an impression on the Führer that Hitler famously declared, upon first seeing Jaeger’s work: “The future belongs to color photography.” But beyond merely chronicling Hitler’s ceaseless travels, Jaeger also documented the brute machinery of the Reich, including the Nazi invasion of Poland in 1939.

The Inca and Their Roads Now primarily a tourist attraction, Inca roads were once the arteries of a mighty Empire. Spanning a the continent lengthwise, the Inca road network covered approximately 22,000 miles of roads and trails with about half of that paved. They built stone surfaced roads where the terrain required it, but merely marked the way and distance on dessert or flat coastal terrain. Many miles of the Inca roads were captured from the civilizations they conquered. Some were built purely for ceremonial purposes, but the primary purpose of the roads was to hold the Empire together by providing vital arteries for communications and troop movements. The Inca Empire was less than a century old when conquered by the Spanish although Inca civilization before imperial expansion was significantly older.

Color Survey Results Who in the rainbow can draw the line where the violet tint ends and the orange tint begins? Distinctly we see the difference of the colors, but where exactly does the one first blendingly enter into the other? So with sanity and insanity. —Herman Melville, Billy Budd Orange, red? I don’t know what to believe anymore! At 63, World's Oldest Known Bird Is Expecting Another Chick Wisdom, a Laysan albatross who is the oldest known tagged bird in the world, keeps astonishing biologists and her fans with her continued return to the Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge in the Pacific. Now she’s brought hope yet again with an announcement this week that she’s expecting another chick at the age of 63. “We are thrilled with the public’s interest in Wisdom. She really captures peoples’ imagination around the world, particularly kids’, and has become a great ambassador for conservation and Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge,” said Bret Wolfe, deputy refuge manager.

The crayola-fication of the world: How we gave colors names, and it messed with our brains (part II) Untitled (Cubes) by Scott Taylor Update: This post was an Editor’s pick by Cristy Gelling at Science Seeker, and was included in Bora Zivkovic‘s top 10 science blog posts of the week. Lately, I’ve got colors on the brain. In part I of this post I talked about the common roads that different cultures travel down as they name the colors in their world. And I came across the idea that color names are, in some sense, culturally universal.

Joel Meyerowitz Black and White in Color From his street photography in New York to his soft seascapes on Cape Cod, Joel Meyerowitz’s pioneering work has been crucial to the acceptance of color photography among curators and collectors. The notion that color was somehow less worthy than black-and-white may seem quaint now, but it was a serious question in the 1960s. He has answered that question — and posed new ones over an impressive half-century career that is the subject of “Joel Meyerowitz: Taking My Time,” a two-volume monograph published this month by Phaidon. He addresses the debate in the first volume, with an insert tucked inside titled “A Question of Color.”

Beginner's Guide to the Inca Empire Overview of the Inca Empire The Inca Empire was the largest pre-hispanic society of South America when it was 'discovered' by the Spanish conquistadors led by Francisco Pizarro in the 16th century AD. At its height, the Inca empire controlled all of the western part of the South American continent between Ecuador and Chile. The Inca capital was at Cusco, Peru, and the Inca legends claimed they were descended from the great Tiwanaku civilization at Lake Titicaca. Origins of the Inca Empire Archaeologist Gordon McEwan has built an extensive study of archaeological, ethnographic, and historical sources of information on the Inca origins.

List of colors The following is a list of colors. A number of the color swatches below are taken from domain-specific naming schemes such as X11 or HTML4. RGB values are given for each swatch because such standards are defined in terms of the sRGB color space. It is not possible to accurately convert many of these swatches to CMYK values because of the differing gamuts of the two spaces, but the color management systems built into operating systems and image editing software attempt such conversions as accurately as possible. A Mother's Dictionary This page is brought to you by UC Berkeley Parents Network Back to the Jokes & Quotes Collection The opinions and statements expressed on this page are those of parents who belong to the UC Berkeley Parents Network and should not be taken as a position of or endorsement by the University of California, Berkeley.

Linguistic relativity The principle of linguistic relativity holds that the structure of a language affects the ways in which its respective speakers conceptualize their world, i.e. their world view, or otherwise influences their cognitive processes. Popularly known as the Sapir–Whorf hypothesis, or Whorfianism, the principle is often defined to include two versions: Strong version: that language determines thought and that linguistic categories limit and determine cognitive categoriesWeak version: that linguistic categories and usage influence thought and certain kinds of non-linguistic behaviour.

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