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Color Theory for Designer, Part 3: Creating Your Own Color Palettes

Color Theory for Designer, Part 3: Creating Your Own Color Palettes
Advertisement In the previous two parts of this series on color theory, we talked mostly about the meanings behind colors1 and color terminology2. While this information is important, I’m sure a lot of people were wondering when we were going to get into the nitty-gritty of actually creating some color schemes. Well, that’s where Part 3 comes in. A Quick Review Let’s start with a quick review of what was covered in parts 1 and 2. In part 2, we covered color terminology: hue (what color something is, like blue or red); chroma (how pure a color is, the lack of white, black or gray added to it); saturation (the strength or weakness of a color); value (how light or dark a color is); tone (created by adding gray to a pure hue); shade (created by adding black to a pure hue); and tint (created by adding white to a hue). Traditional Color Scheme Types There are a number of predefined color scheme standards that make creating new schemes easier, especially for beginners. Monochromatic Examples: Muted Related:  colorWebdesign

Color Theory for Designers, Part 1: The Meaning of Color Color in design is very subjective. What evokes one reaction in one person may evoke a very different reaction in somone else. Sometimes this is due to personal preference, and other times due to cultural background. Color theory is a science in itself. Studying how colors affect different people, either individually or as a group, is something some people build their careers on. And there’s a lot to it. This is the first in a three-part series on color theory. Warm Colors Link Warm colors include red, orange, and yellow, and variations of those three colors. Red and yellow are both primary colors, with orange falling in the middle, which means warm colors are all truly warm and aren’t created by combining a warm color with a cool color. Red (Primary Color) Link Red is a very hot color. Red can be associated with anger, but is also associated with importance (think of the red carpet at awards shows and celebrity events). Outside the western world, red has different associations. Examples

50 Beautiful Color Palettes for Your Next Web Project Choosing the right color scheme is essential to your website’s success. Your layout and other design choices — including font — should be developed in concert with your color scheme, which can ensure readability, cohesiveness, and beauty in the final product. Unfortunately, making that choice or creating a color palette from scratch can be quite the challenge. That’s why for today’s post I’ve put together a collection of 50 beautiful color palettes that are ready to use for your next web project. If you like these, check out another 24 palettes I’ve recently rounded up. Getting the Most Out of This Post Before diving into the color palettes I’ve collected, I want to mention a few tools that can help you get the most out of this post. Editor’s Note: Want to make your own palettes even better? Remember that Photoshop will display certain colors far more vibrantly than they will look on the web when you use hex codes. That’s all. Pick Your Palette Bonus Resources!

Color Theory For Designers, Part 2: Understanding Concepts And Terminology Advertisement If you’re going to use color effectively in your designs, you’ll need to know some color concepts and color theory terminology. A thorough working knowledge of concepts like chroma, value and saturation is key to creating your own awesome color schemes. In Part 1: The Meaning of Color1 of our color theory series, we covered the meanings of different colors. Here, we’ll go over the basics of what affects a given color, such as adding gray, white or black to the pure hue, and its effect on a design, with examples of course. Hue Hue2 is the most basic of color terms and basically denotes an object’s color. Examples 3 The primary hue of the background and some of the typography on the Happy Twitmas website is bright red. 4 Using a lot of pure hues together can add a fun and playful look to a design, as done in the header and elsewhere on this website. 5 Pure red is a very popular hue in Web design. 6 Mix uses a number of pure hues in its header and logo. Chroma Saturation Value Tones

The Gestalt Principles The Gestalt Principles Gestalt is a psychology term which means "unified whole". It refers to theories of visual perception developed by German psychologists in the 1920s. These theories attempt to describe how people tend to organize visual elements into groups or unified wholes when certain principles are applied. These principles are: Similarity Similarity occurs when objects look similar to one another. The example above (containing 11 distinct objects) appears as as single unit because all of the shapes have similarity. Unity occurs because the triangular shapes at the bottom of the eagle symbol look similar to the shapes that form the sunburst. When similarity occurs, an object can be emphasised if it is dissimilar to the others. The figure on the far right becomes a focal point because it is dissimilar to the other shapes. Continuation Continuation occurs when the eye is compelled to move through one object and continue to another object. Closure Examples Proximity Figure and Ground Figure

RGB Color Codes Chart RGB color picker | RGB color codes chart | RGB color space | RGB color format and calculation | RGB color table RGB color picker RGB color codes chart Hover with cursor on color to get the hex and decimal color codes below: RGB color space RGB color space or RGB color system, constructs all the colors from the combination of the Red, Green and Blue colors. The red, green and blue use 8 bits each, which have integer values from 0 to 255. RGB ≡ Red, Green, Blue Each pixel in the LCD monitor displays colors this way, by combination of red, green and blue LEDs (light emitting diodes). When the red pixel is set to 0, the LED is turned off. Any value between them sets the LED to partial light emission. RGB color format & calculation RGB code has 24 bits format (bits 0..23): RGB = (R*65536)+(G*256)+B , (when R is RED, G is GREEN and B is BLUE) Calculation examples White RGB Color White RGB code = 255*65536+255*256+255 = #FFFFFF Blue RGB Color Blue RGB code = 0*65536+0*256+255 = #0000FF Red RGB Color See also

Color Palette Generator All you need to create a websiteGet a domain and create a website with Squarespace Color Palette Generator #ffeeff #ffccdd #eeaaaa dull #33aa77 #ffeeee #ffbbdd #ff7799 vibrant URL of image: Make color schemes. If you like this you might also like my logo maker All Tools Biorhythms Business Card Generator Calendars, Printable Swiss Style Color Palette Generator Color Picker Comic Strip Maker Crapola Translator Drawmigo Favicon Generator Flickr RSS Feed Generator IMG2TXT Invent-a-Word Logoshi Logo Maker Pixel Art Generator Rainbow Words ROT13 Subwords! Reference Ajax Example ASCII Table Current Stamp Price Jedi Robe Pattern Recipes Special Characters URL Encoded Chars Really Old Fun and Games Hangman Horoscope Magic 8 Ball Mastermind Star Wars Costumes © 1999 - 2019 DeGraeve.com

10 Super Useful Tools for Choosing the Right Color Palette Whether you are designing a clean corporate website or a grunge portfolio site, color is going to play a major role in how the design is perceived by the audience. That’s why it’s important to get the colors right upfront. There are plenty of tools out there made especially for this, but like anything else some are better than others. Here are 10 color tools that I think are exceptionally useful. ColoRotate As well as being a useful way to choose colors, ColoRotate looks cool and is actually fun to use. Kuler Kuler is a community driven web app that lets your browse color palettes created by others. Color Scheme Designer Color Scheme Designer has been around for a while, but was just recently updated with a brand new interface and a new color scheme generating engine. COLOURlovers COLOURlovers provides more than just a way to find color palettes. Copaso Copaso is COLOURlovers palette generating tool. Color Blender Toucan ColorMunki Color Wizard Color Explorer About the Author Related Posts Read More

Five Ways To Prevent Bad Microcopy Advertisement You’ve just created the best user experience ever. You had the idea. You sketched it out. Microcopy is the text we don’t talk about very often. If you think you’ve built the best user experience but didn’t make sure the microcopy was spot on, then you haven’t built the best user experience. With the adoption of agile development and lean UX, we’re often concerned about racing through iterations and getting our products in front of customers. Everyone frets about marketing copy — and they should — but communication doesn’t stop once you’ve sold the user. If your microcopy isn’t getting the job done, you’ll lose users — and all the marketing in the world might not get you a second chance. With that in mind, here are five ways to make sure your website’s microcopy doesn’t end up sinking your UX. 1. I’m willing to bet that your experience is plastered with internal terminology, especially your labels and navigation. Don’t let it happen. 2. TheLadders is a job-matching service.

Color Models The purpose of a color model is to facilitate the specification of colors in some standard generally accepted way. In essence, a color model is a specification of a 3-D coordinate system and a subspace within that system where each color is represented by a single point. Each industry that uses color employs the most suitable color model. For example, the RGB color model is used in computer graphics, YUV or YCbCr are used in video systems, PhotoYCC* is used in PhotoCD* production and so on. RGB Color Model In the RGB model, each color appears as a combination of red, green, and blue. Primary and Secondary Colors for RGB and CMYK Models The color subspace of interest is a cube shown in Figure "RGB and CMY Color Models" (RGB values are normalized to 0..1), in which RGB values are at three corners; cyan, magenta, and yellow are the three other corners, black is at their origin; and white is at the corner farthest from the origin. RGB and CMY Color Models CMYK Color Model YUV Color Model luma Luma

tools | color palette creator v1.6.1 This tool was inspired directly by the excellent Creating Color Palettes article by Andy Clarke. It will create 10 shades of the base color, located top-left, at varying degrees of opacity. The top row emulates opacity over a white background, the bottom over black (or colors of your choosing as of v1.4). How to use it: Type a valid six character hexidecimal value in the text box above and hit the "ok" button. Hit the "output hex" button to have the table below the palette display hexidecimal color values. Click the "save base" button to write the current base color to a cookie for safe keeping. As of version 1.6, you can export all of your saved palettes to a PNG image by clicking the "create PNG" button in the "saved" window.

Design Principles: Visual Perception And The Principles Of Gestalt Advertisement In 1910, psychologist Max Wertheimer had an insight when he observed a series of lights flashing on and off at a railroad crossing. It was similar to how the lights encircling a movie theater marquee flash on and off. To the observer, it appears as if a single light moves around the marquee, traveling from bulb to bulb, when in reality it’s a series of bulbs turning on and off and the lights don’t move it all. This observation led to a set of descriptive principles about how we visually perceive objects. This is the start of a series of posts about design principles. Future posts in this series will consider aspects of design like space, balance and visual hierarchy. The Key Ideas Behind Gestalt Theory “The whole is other than the sum of the parts.” — Kurt Koffka The quote above is gestalt in a nutshell. There are several key ideas behind gestalt: Emergence (the whole is identified before the parts)Emergence is the process of forming complex patterns from simple rules. Closure

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