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Color Theory For Designers: Creating Your Own Color Palettes

Color Theory For Designers: Creating Your Own Color Palettes
Advertisement In the previous two parts of this series on color theory, we talked mostly about the meanings behind colors1 and color terminology2. While this information is important, I’m sure a lot of people were wondering when we were going to get into the nitty-gritty of actually creating some color schemes. Well, that’s where Part 3 comes in. Here we’ll be talking about methods for creating your own color schemes, from scratch. We’ll cover the traditional color scheme patterns (monochrome, analogous, complementary, etc.) as well as how to create custom schemes that aren’t based strictly on any one pattern. A Quick Review Let’s start with a quick review of what was covered in parts 1 and 2. Traditional Color Scheme Types There are a number of predefined color scheme standards that make creating new schemes easier, especially for beginners. The basic, twelve-spoke color wheel is an important tool in creating color schemes. Monochromatic Examples: Analogous Complementary Split Complementary

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The Gestalt Principles The Gestalt Principles Gestalt is a psychology term which means "unified whole". It refers to theories of visual perception developed by German psychologists in the 1920s. 50 Beautiful Color Palettes for Your Next Web Project Choosing the right color scheme is essential to your website’s success. Your layout and other design choices — including font — should be developed in concert with your color scheme, which can ensure readability, cohesiveness, and beauty in the final product. Unfortunately, making that choice or creating a color palette from scratch can be quite the challenge. That’s why for today’s post I’ve put together a collection of 50 beautiful color palettes that are ready to use for your next web project.

Color Theory for Designers, Part 1: The Meaning of Color Color in design is very subjective. What evokes one reaction in one person may evoke a very different reaction in somone else. Sometimes this is due to personal preference, and other times due to cultural background. Color theory is a science in itself. The Psychology of Fonts - Infographic Choosing the right fonts is one of the most important decisions when it comes to anything relating to design, whether it be a printed graphic or a website. Knowing the psychology behind choosing the correct font will give you the upper hand when it comes to designing. Weemss took the time to layout this Infographic on the psychology of fonts displaying the top 5 in each group, and what type of events they are best used for. Shortlink:

Five Ways To Prevent Bad Microcopy Advertisement You’ve just created the best user experience ever. You had the idea. You sketched it out. You started to build it. Except you’re already in trouble, because you’ve forgotten something: the copy. Color Palette Generator Color Palette Generator #ffeeff #ffccdd #eeaaaa

RGB Color Codes Chart RGB color picker | RGB color codes chart | RGB color space | RGB color format and calculation | RGB color table RGB color picker RGB color codes chart Hover with cursor on color to get the hex and decimal color codes below: The Ultimate Guide to Golden Ratio Typography Right now, there’s a mathematical symphony happening on your website. Every single one of your readers is subconsciously aware of this symphony, and more important, they are all pre-programmed to respond to it in a particular way. The question is this: Is your site’s symphony pleasing and inviting to your readers, or does it turn them off and make it harder to communicate with them?

Design Principles: Visual Perception And The Principles Of Gestalt Advertisement In 1910, psychologist Max Wertheimer had an insight when he observed a series of lights flashing on and off at a railroad crossing. It was similar to how the lights encircling a movie theater marquee flash on and off. To the observer, it appears as if a single light moves around the marquee, traveling from bulb to bulb, when in reality it’s a series of bulbs turning on and off and the lights don’t move it all. This observation led to a set of descriptive principles about how we visually perceive objects. These principles sit at the heart of nearly everything we do graphically as designers.

color palette creator v1.6.1 This tool was inspired directly by the excellent Creating Color Palettes article by Andy Clarke. It will create 10 shades of the base color, located top-left, at varying degrees of opacity. The top row emulates opacity over a white background, the bottom over black (or colors of your choosing as of v1.4). The opacity values are 100% opaque, 75%, 50%, 25% and 10% on the top row. The bottom row begins at 85% rather than 100% and continues on as the first. Color Models The purpose of a color model is to facilitate the specification of colors in some standard generally accepted way. In essence, a color model is a specification of a 3-D coordinate system and a subspace within that system where each color is represented by a single point. Each industry that uses color employs the most suitable color model. For example, the RGB color model is used in computer graphics, YUV or YCbCr are used in video systems, PhotoYCC* is used in PhotoCD* production and so on. Transferring color information from one industry to another requires transformation from one set of values to another. Intel IPP provides a wide number of functions to convert different color spaces to RGB and vice versa.