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Color Matters - Design and Art - Color Theory

Color Matters - Design and Art - Color Theory
Color theory encompasses a multitude of definitions, concepts and design applications - enough to fill several encyclopedias. However, there are three basic categories of color theory that are logical and useful : The color wheel, color harmony, and the context of how colors are used. Color theories create a logical structure for color. For example, if we have an assortment of fruits and vegetables, we can organize them by color and place them on a circle that shows the colors in relation to each other. The Color Wheel A color circle, based on red, yellow and blue, is traditional in the field of art. There are also definitions (or categories) of colors based on the color wheel. Primary Colors: Red, yellow and blueIn traditional color theory (used in paint and pigments), primary colors are the 3 pigment colors that cannot be mixed or formed by any combination of other colors. Secondary Colors: Green, orange and purpleThese are the colors formed by mixing the primary colors. Color Harmony 1.

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Color Psychology - The Psychology of Color Do you feel anxious in a yellow room? Does the color blue make you feel calm and relaxed? Artists and interior designers have long believed that color can dramatically affect moods, feelings, and emotions. "Colors, like features, follow the changes of the emotions," the artist Pablo Picasso once remarked. Color is a powerful communication tool and can be used to signal action, influence mood, and even influence physiological reactions. Certain colors have been associated with increased blood pressure, increased metabolism, and eyestrain.

» How to Add Depth to a Photo When we take a photo with our cameras, we turn a 3D image into just 2D, and that can cause problems when you’re trying to display depth. It has it’s advantages and disadvantages, depending on what you’re trying to convey with your photo, but ultimately it holds you back when you’re trying to add depth to a photo. If you’ve read many of my tutorials on composition, then you’ll know by now that by implementing some of these techniques, that you can add depth quite easily, and we’re gonna have a look at them now. Rule of Thirds Color » Design Festival If you are designing, or re-designing your web site, it is time well spent running your website through the color accessibility tools below to ensure that your site can be seen correctly by as many people as possible. Most of these tools use WC3 guidelines to perform their various operations. If you can actually read and understand them, the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0 requires, amongst other things, that there is sufficient contrast between text and background color. For a person with a color disability, the colors used on a web site can mean the difference between being able to read text and images or not. 1 in 12 people have some sort of color deficiency. Vischeck allows you to see your website or an image, as a person with color disabilities would see it. The Gray Bit web site comes with the tagline, “Experience Color, Wearing Shades of Gray”.

Color Schemes, Color Palettes, Color Theory Color in Motion Available in English and Spanish, this flash presentation presents an animated, interactive demonstration of the symbolism and emotions associated with various colors, including the best uses of these colors. Colors on the Web Color theory, color combinations, color physics, and the use of colors on web pages are discussed, and a color wheel allows users to test out what they have learned. Other tools include color names, a color wizard, and a color scheme tool. ColorExplorer Using Focal Points in Photography By Robert Parviainen Next time you take your digital camera out and line it up for a shot pause before you press the shutter button and ask yourself: “What is the Focal Point in this Picture?” Some other ways to ask the same question might include – What is the central point of interest?

30 Sample Company Letterhead Design Pieces for Inspiration by admin | June 7, 2010 | Design The core of an identity package, to me, is letterhead design. It is where your unique branding can speak the best, alongside all your company’s correspondences. The Psychology of Color Reprinted from Vol 5-1 of the BT Journal In wildlife photography, I think the psychology of color plays an overwhelming role in the success of an image to communicate. I've waited a long time to present this piece and I can't think of a better time than with the Journal's first color issue to bring you what I think are critical concepts for success. Advertising-grabbing the attention of the buyer to buy one's product.

Improving your photography: Composition IMPROVING YOUR PHOTOGRAPHYLesson Two: Composition by Peter Ensenberger,Arizona Highways Director of Photography In a recent "Photography Talk" column, I discussed developing an awareness of light and its relationship to the subjects in your photographs. Typeface Anatomy and Glossary Here’s a glossary of common type terminology, which along with the FAQs may answer many font related questions. If the information you need isn’t here, call us. Abbreviations Many fonts have abbreviations in their names. Some relate to glyph sets and font formats, others to design traits and foundries, and so on.

Color Think Tank - the psychology of color Our personal and cultural associations affect our experience of color. Colors are seen as warm or cool mainly because of long-held (and often universal) associations. Yellow, orange and red are associated with the heat of sun and fire; blue, green and violet with the coolness of leaves, sea and the sky. Warm colors seem closer to the viewer than cool colors, but vivid cool colors can overwhelm light and subtle warm colors. Using warm colors for foreground and cool colors for background enhances the perception of depth. Although red, yellow and orange are in general considered high-arousal colors and blue, green and most violets are low-arousal hues, the brilliance, darkness and lightness of a color can alter the psychological message.

Balance in photography an important composition techniques What does balance in photography mean? If you place every element of interest in a photograph on one side or another, or more commonly by the beginners in the center of the image, you are leaving little or nothing to look at on the opposite side. This will be a unbalanced and most likely an uninteresting image. Formal balance There are basically two types of balance in photography. The first is formal balance, also called symmetrical balance.

Color Rules of Thumb "I just wanted to send you a quick email on behalf of some of the children I volunteer with at the Family Nature Club here in Utah. We've been reviewing some resources on the Internet for our science projects and came across your page and found it extremely helpful! As a thank you, a couple of the kids wanted to send you back another page they found about eco-friendly wall painting that they thought you might want to add to your site because it could help you and your visitors as well They've actually been using it as much as your page to complete their project and thought it would be exciting to see it up on the same page as where they got the information from your site that helped them so much. I even offered Jenny, the student that presented it to me, extra credit if you wanted to help us!

An understanding of color theory can help send your project from decent to outstanding. Learn the story behind color theory and discover which colors work best together. by baileykretz Oct 1

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