background preloader

Color Thief

Color Thief

http://lokeshdhakar.com/projects/color-thief/

Related:  effets photoscolorColor PalettesColorVäreistä

Pixel Spreadsheet Microscope image of an iPhone screen.It really is just a spreadsheet. Digital photographs are actually just spreadsheets. When you take a photo, your camera measures the amount of red, green and blue light hitting each pixel, ranks them on a scale from 0 to 255 and then records those values as a spreadsheet. Matt Parker found a way to actually open digital photos as spreadsheets in Excel. The Fascinating Neuroscience Of Color Neuroscientist Bevil Conway thinks about color for a living. An artist since youth, Conway now spends much of his time studying vision and perception at Wellesley College and Harvard Medical School. His science remains strongly linked to art--in 2004 he and Margaret Livingstone famously reported that Rembrandt may have suffered from flawed vision--and in recent years Conway has focused his research almost entirely on the neural machinery behind color. "I think it's a very powerful system," he tells Co.Design, "and it's completely underexploited." Conway's research into the brain's color systems has clear value for designers and artists like himself. It stands to reason, after all, that someone who understands how the brain processes color will be able to present it to others in a more effective way.

Introduction to ggthemes library("ggplot2") library("ggthemes") p <- ggplot(mtcars, aes(x = wt, y = mpg)) + geom_point() + ggtitle("Cars") p2 <- ggplot(mtcars, aes(x = wt, y = mpg, colour = factor(gear))) + geom_point() + ggtitle("Cars") p3 <- p2 + facet_wrap(~ am) Tufte theme and geoms Minimal theme and geoms based on plots in The Visual Display of Quantitative Information. p + geom_rangeframe() + theme_tufte() + scale_x_continuous(breaks = extended_range_breaks()(mtcars$wt)) + scale_y_continuous(breaks = extended_range_breaks()(mtcars$mpg))

Color Theory For Designers, Part 2: Understanding Concepts And Terminology Advertisement If you’re going to use color effectively in your designs, you’ll need to know some color concepts and color theory terminology. A thorough working knowledge of concepts like chroma, value and saturation is key to creating your own awesome color schemes. In Part 1: The Meaning of Color1 of our color theory series, we covered the meanings of different colors. Here, we’ll go over the basics of what affects a given color, such as adding gray, white or black to the pure hue, and its effect on a design, with examples of course.

Color Theory for Designers, Part 1: The Meaning of Color Color in design is very subjective. What evokes one reaction in one person may evoke a very different reaction in somone else. Sometimes this is due to personal preference, and other times due to cultural background. Color theory is a science in itself. Studying how colors affect different people, either individually or as a group, is something some people build their careers on. And there’s a lot to it.

How Many Brands’ Distinct Shades of Blue Can You Correctly Identify? Feeling blue? Good--because that’s the kind of mindset you’ll need to play Name That Blue, a simple game that not only reveals how many companies prefer that particular hue, but also your perhaps unrealized ability to distinguish between them. Created by web developer Colin Gourlay, Name That Blue is a testament to your investment in the brands that wallpaper your world. If you are able to distinguish Facebook-sapphire from IBM-azure, then you are either incredibly observant or around these particular shades so often that they’ve seeped into subconscious associations. As a bonus, Gourlay includes other colors as well.

The Pirate Plot (2.0) – The RDI plotting choice of R pirates Package update! Yesterday I updated the yarrr package and pirateplot() function with additional functionality. To see the updates, check out my latest post here Test gratuit d'acuité visuelle How color vision works Human can distinguish colors when incoming light reacts with the cone cells in the retina of eye. There are three types of cone cells. Based on how they respond to light of wavelengths you will perceive the three basic colors; red, green and blue.

Color harmonies: Essential tips for selecting colors Color is often a critical factor in design. There are virtually millions of colors and shades to choose from. This makes choosing a project’s pallet complicated. Here are a few tips to help you through in selecting colors that can complement each other. Although color preference can be very subjective, and it preferences can change over time, there are a few basic guidelines that can help you to select and and marry colors. Let’s look at ideas for combining colors correctly.

Related:  webtoolColor