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Fred Herzog

Tony Ray-Jones. Kodachrome. The stories behind Juergen Teller's best shots. The Little Blighter: Björk and son ‘I had the pleasure of visiting Björk and her son in September 1993 in Iceland.

The stories behind Juergen Teller's best shots

As soon as I saw him, I was fascinated by how similar they looked. Björk was an excellent host, cooked at her home and showed me around. Of course we went to the Blue Lagoon where we made this picture. Elliott Erwitt, Coloring Outside the Lines.

Early Colour

HELMUT NEWTON: “COLOR” ANTOINE D’AGATA. New York City photos by Charles W. Cushman reveal 1940s life in the Big Apple. Photos by Indiana snapper Charles Weever Cushman in 1941 and 1942Expensive colour Kodachrome was used to take impressive collectionMany buildings have since been demolished but some of them still stand By Mark Duell Created: 14:08 GMT, 13 September 2011 It’s been 70 years since an Indiana photographer visited New York City and returned home with an amazing collection of holiday snaps. But Charles Weever Cushman’s pictures are even more impressive today, as they were taken on pricey colour Kodachrome and look far more recent than they actually are.

Wim Wenders

The ASC: Kodachrome Fades—Out: But the Afterglow Lingers « John Bailey’s Bailiwick. Final frame, final photo R.I.P..

The ASC: Kodachrome Fades—Out: But the Afterglow Lingers « John Bailey’s Bailiwick

This is the last photograph on the last roll of Kodachrome film manufactured by Kodak. It was taken by National Geographic photojournalist Steve McCurry with his trusty Nikon F, the camera on which for decades he loaded thousands of 36 exposure rolls of the 35mm color-transparency film.

William Eggleston

Gregory Crewdson. HELEN LEVITT: “COLOR” (1971-1981. Stephen Shore. Some work by Stephen Shore 'Ashland, Wisconsin, Jig-Saw Puzzle in Cabin #8, Beach Motel, July 9, 1973', 1973-2006 'Hamburger Steak Dinner, Redfield, SD, July 13, 1973', 1973-2007 'Room 110, Holiday Inn, Brainerd, MN, July 11, 1973', 1973-2007 'Stampeder Motel, Ontario, Oregon, July 19, 1973', 1973-2007.

Stephen Shore

The Execution of Lady Jane Grey. Lady Jane Grey was Queen of England for just 9 days until she was driven from the throne and sent to the Tower of London to be executed.

The Execution of Lady Jane Grey

Jane became queen after the death of her cousin, Edward VI in 1553. As a Protestant, Jane was crowned queen in a bid to shore up Protestantism and keep Catholic influence at bay. The plan didn't work. Jane's claim to the crown was much weaker than Edward VI's half sister Mary.

Saul Leiter

Jeff Wall. The Brink of Oblivion: Inside Nazi-Occupied Poland, 1939-1940. In the late 1930s and early 1940s, a German photographer and ardent Nazi named Hugo Jaeger enjoyed unprecedented access to the Third Reich’s upper echelon, traveling with Adolf Hitler to massive rallies and photographing him at intimate parties and in quieter, private moments.

The Brink of Oblivion: Inside Nazi-Occupied Poland, 1939-1940

The photos made such an impression on the Führer that Hitler famously declared, upon first seeing Jaeger’s work: “The future belongs to color photography.” But beyond merely chronicling Hitler’s ceaseless travels, Jaeger also documented the brute machinery of the Reich, including the Nazi invasion of Poland in 1939. Rare Color Photos from the Depression Era. These vivid color photos taken during the Great Depression and World War II capture an era generally seen only in black-and-white.

Rare Color Photos from the Depression Era

Photographers working for the United States Farm Security Administration (FSA) and later the Office of War Information (OWI) created the images between 1939 and 1944. The FSA/OWI pictures depict life in the United States, including Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, with a focus on rural areas and farm labor, as well as aspects of World War II mobilization, including factories, railroads, aviation training, and women working.

The original images are color transparencies ranging in size from 35 mm to 4-by-5 inches. Home : I BARELY REMEMBER _____________ America in Color from 1939-1943. Posted Jul 26, 2010 Share This Gallery inShare324 These images, by photographers of the Farm Security Administration/Office of War Information, are some of the only color photographs taken of the effects of the Depression on America’s rural and small town populations.

America in Color from 1939-1943

The photographs and captions are the property of the Library of Congress and were included in a 2006 exhibit Bound for Glory: America in Color. Faro and Doris Caudill, homesteaders. Pie Town, New Mexico, October 1940. Alex Prager. Continuing to look at West Coast photographers….

Alex Prager

Alex Prager’s imagery can only be a product of growing up in Los Angeles and being surrounded by a culture of cinematic references and plastic surgery. Armed with a trunk load of wigs, false eyelashes, and Tippi Hedren inspired ensembles, Alex has created two bodies of work that are the love children of Alfred Hitchcock and Tina Louise in The Stepford Wives.

Polyester, and her new series, The Big Valley, showcase young beautiful women in heightened movie still environments. Joel Meyerowitz Black and White in Color. From his street photography in New York to his soft seascapes on Cape Cod, Joel Meyerowitz’s pioneering work has been crucial to the acceptance of color photography among curators and collectors.

Joel Meyerowitz Black and White in Color

The notion that color was somehow less worthy than black-and-white may seem quaint now, but it was a serious question in the 1960s. He has answered that question — and posed new ones over an impressive half-century career that is the subject of “Joel Meyerowitz: Taking My Time,” a two-volume monograph published this month by Phaidon. He addresses the debate in the first volume, with an insert tucked inside titled “A Question of Color.” The crayola-fication of the world: How we gave colors names, and it messed with our brains (part I) “Who in the rainbow can draw the line where the violet tint ends and the orange tint begins?

The crayola-fication of the world: How we gave colors names, and it messed with our brains (part I)

Distinctly we see the difference of the colors, but where exactly does the one first blendingly enter into the other? So with sanity and insanity.” Visual: movie poster color schemes, from 1914 to 2012. Software engineer Vijay Pandurangan recently analyzed color data from over 35,000 movie posters, in an attempt to test his theory that most posters have, over time, become darker and bluer. His findings, represented above, seem to support his theory. Pandurangan began with films made in the year 1914 (displayed at the top of the graphic), and went all the way up to the present day (sans 1924), tallying each poster’s pixel count and brightness levels. The aggregated results suggest that film posters have indeed become darker over the years, though Pandurangan doesn’t have an easy explanation for this trend. His friend, designer Cheryle Cranbourne, offered this theory: “[The posters] cover a good range of genres.

Nan Goldin

Goethe on the Psychology of Color and Emotion. Color is an essential part of how we experience the world, both biologically and culturally. One of the earliest formal explorations of color theory came from an unlikely source — the German poet, artist, and politician Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, who in 1810 published Theory of Colours (public library; public domain), his treatise on the nature, function, and psychology of colors. Though the work was dismissed by a large portion of the scientific community, it remained of intense interest to a cohort of prominent philosophers and physicists, including Arthur Schopenhauer, Kurt Gödel, and Ludwig Wittgenstein.

One of Goethe’s most radical points was a refutation of Newton’s ideas about the color spectrum, suggesting instead that darkness is an active ingredient rather than the mere passive absence of light. Before and After D-Day: Rare Color Photos From England and France, 1944. It’s no mystery why images of unremitting violence spring to mind when one hears the deceptively simple term, “D-Day.” We’ve all seen — in photos, movies, old news reels, and usually in grim black-and-white — what happened on the beaches of Normandy (codenamed Omaha, Utah, Juno, Gold and Sword) as the Allies unleashed their historic assault against German defenses on June 6, 1944.

But in color photos taken before and after the invasion, LIFE magazine’s Frank Scherschel captured countless other, lesser-known scenes from the run-up to the onslaught and the heady weeks after: American troops training in small English towns; the French countryside, implausibly lush after the spectral landscape of the beachheads; the reception GIs enjoyed en route to the capital; the jubilant liberation of Paris itself. As presented here, in masterfully restored color, Scherschel’s pictures — most of which were never published in LIFE — feel at-once profoundly familiar and somehow utterly, vividly new.