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Hypnagogia and Hypnopompia

Hypnagogia and Hypnopompia
Hypnagogia is the imagery, sounds and strange bodily feelings that are felt at “sleep onset.” This is a simplification though, as researchers have noted hypnagogic imagery in the lab at periods of quiet wakefulness as well as stage 1 sleep. Others have correlated hypnagogia with pre-sleep alpha waves and also REM intrusion into sleep onset. The truth is that the wake-sleep transition is still not understood. And neither are its trippy visuals. whispy lights, multi-dimentional geometric objects, or a sudden image like a stranger’s face Few people remember hypnagogic imagery. Strange noises, voices and rushing sounds are typical, as well as weird mechanistic sounds like beeps and boops. Some hear music — I personally have had lucid hypnagogic orchestras from time to time, with the ability to listen passively or focus on a particular instrument to induce a solo. Entoptica - by Ryan Hurd, 2005, acrylic: inspired by my hypnagogic imagery Some people are haunted by the hypnagogic imagery. Related:  Sleep and DreamsSomnulus

Dawn simulator curbs wintertime blues International Association for the Sudy of Dreams | Regional Conferences, Meetings & Co-hosted Events IASD encourages its members to host regional meetings and co-sponsored events, and IASD will provide logistical and financial support to promote such events. The benefits of regional meetings and co-sponsored events are twofold. First, they help IASD members in a particular geographical region to meet each other, socialize, network, and share their different approaches to dreams. Second, they help to advance the basic mission of IASD, which is to broaden public awareness and appreciation of dreams. Although these are the primary goals, another aim is to generate new funds for IASD’s educational and outreach programs. Dreams, Shamanism, & Mythology The Toronto Region of the International Association for the Study of Dreams (IASD) is pleased to announce this two-day conference on dreams, shamanism, and mythology featuring world-renowned dream researcher and psychologist Stanley Krippner. Click here to learn more about this regional conference and to register>>>

The human brain can create structures in up to 11 dimensions Neuroscientists have used a classic branch of maths in a totally new way to peer into the structure of our brains. What they've discovered is that the brain is full of multi-dimensional geometrical structures operating in as many as 11 dimensions. We're used to thinking of the world from a 3-D perspective, so this may sound a bit tricky, but the results of this new study could be the next major step in understanding the fabric of the human brain - the most complex structure we know of. This latest brain model was produced by a team of researchers from the Blue Brain Project, a Swiss research initiative devoted to building a supercomputer-powered reconstruction of the human brain. The team used algebraic topology, a branch of mathematics used to describe the properties of objects and spaces regardless of how they change shape. "We found a world that we had never imagined," says lead researcher, neuroscientist Henry Markram from the EPFL institute in Switzerland.

SleepTiming: Sleep Calculator International Association for the Study of Dreams The New Map Of The Brain Trying to map the brain has always been cartography for fools. Most of the other parts of the body reveal their workings with little more than a glance. The heart is self-evidently a pump; the lungs are clearly bellows. But the brain, which does more than any organ, reveals least of all. The 3-lb. lump of wrinkled tissue--with no moving parts, no joints or valves--not only serves as the motherboard for all the body's other systems but also is the seat of your mind, your thoughts, your sense that you exist at all. You have a liver; you have your limbs. The struggle of the mind to fathom the brain it inhabits is the most circular kind of search--the cognitive equivalent of M.C. Modern scientists have done a far better job of things, dividing the brain into multiple, discrete regions with satisfyingly technical names--hypothalamus, caudate nucleus, neocortex--and mapping particular functions to particular sites. Slowly, that is changing.

Working with Dreams: Techniques of CG Jung & James Hillman Working with Dreams: Depth Psychology Techniques of Carl Gustav Jung and James Hillman Dream work is ancient, it’s long tradition evidenced in the temples of Asclepius in Greece where individuals went to be healed through their dreams. Dreams have been an important aspect of many spiritual traditions, and even Freud considered the study of dreams to be his most important work. There are many methods of dream analysis. When working with dreams, it can be helpful to intentionally assess them from various aspects, including mythical, archetypal, alchemical, and collective, and to pay attention to which resonate most strongly emotionally and elicit even a physical response in order to begin to understand what insights are being gifted through your unconscious. I find Hillman’s technique enjoyable and rewarding as an activity, like reading a good book or watching a movie with a plot and characters that take place in front of your eyes. Jung asserts, “A dream…is a product of the total psyche.

The Paradox of Sleep translation Anglais

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