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Abelton Life

Abelton Life
MPC Style Note Repeats With Impulse And Beat Repeat Learn how to create those classic MPC snare rolls with today’s Ableton Live tutorial. All you need is Impulse and Beat Repeat. You’ll be creating interesting live drum sequences in no time. File Under: Tutorials | 18 Comments » Top 5 Free VST Plugins For Ableton Live (Mac Edition)

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Vespers Sometimes the most rewarding production tricks or techniques are the simplest ones. Certainly they are often the ones that yield the most “happy accidents,” the term I use for when experimentation yields something that rocks. Over the next while, I’m going to go through some of my go-to tricks for inspiration from unlikely sources – the often overlooked, sometimes misunderstood, always unappreciated devices in Live’s catalog. L i v e l a b . d k - Products - LiveSlice This beat slicer can do much more than just slice your beats and export the results. You can load up to 64 wave files at a time, slice them up and combine the slices in the multitrack arranger. Each slice is coloured based on the content so you can easily tell them apart - this makes manual rearranging a lot faster, and more inspirational, since you are working with direct representations of the audio and not just abstract midi notes. If you find arranging beats in a piano roll / drum map a bit awkward at times, LiveSlice will definately change the way you make music. With support for wav, aif, REX, mp3 and ACIDized wav files, as well as fast drag'n'drop import of multiple files, you can easily access your entire collection of loops. Even one shot samples can be dragged to a loop slot, so you can do some quick single hit replacements.

17 Amazing Ableton Live Tutorials Ableton Live is a DAW that's not only good at producing music, but it's also useful when you're playing live. It's available for both PCs and Macs, so just about anyone can use the software. One of Live's unique features is its session view. This is a non-linear grid for recording and playing your music ideas in any order. The program can deal with MIDI and audio, supports VST instruments, and has great looping features. It is flexible for musicians, and loved by DJs. One Note Techno John Selway In the second installment of Techno Fundamentals, electronic music producer and Dubspot instructor John Selway looks at the “one note lead” idea using Ableton Live‘s Analog instrument. Commonly used in techno and other styles of electronic dance music where melody takes a backseat to rhythm, the “one note lead” is a simple yet very effective composition technique. Just in case you missed the previous tutorial, More Than A Bassline, check it out here, and do stay tuned for part three. Continuing where I left off in the first Techno Fundamentals tutorial, in this new installment I’m demonstrating another take on the idea of starting with a very simple musical element that, with a few precise sound design techniques and real time control, becomes a major element and source of energy for a track.

30 Tips for Ableton Live Everyone Should Know, with Live Master Thavius Beck [Tips, Videos] Thavius Beck live in Los Angeles playing the legendary Low End Theory party, in 2009. Whadayaknow, Ableton users? Whether you’re an existing user or considering it for the first time, this month online school Dubspot is giving away 30 video lessons on using the software, free, through the end of June only. Music Theory As of July 1, 2013 ThinkQuest has been discontinued. We would like to thank everyone for being a part of the ThinkQuest global community: Students - For your limitless creativity and innovation, which inspires us all. Teachers - For your passion in guiding students on their quest. Partners - For your unwavering support and evangelism. Parents - For supporting the use of technology not only as an instrument of learning, but as a means of creating knowledge.

FACTmagazine Subscribe to FACT TV: From the start of July through to the end of September, Jackmaster will hold down a residency at XOYO, playing every Saturday with a variety of guests that includes Joy Orbison, Moodymann and Kenny Dope. This Saturday, he shares the stage with two titans of grime and dubstep, Slimzee and Loefah. A member of Pay As U Go Cartel and a key part of Rinse FM from the start, Slimzee was the grime DJ. He’d spin for the two best MCs – Dizzee Rascal and Wiley – and if a rival DJ had a special VIP dubplate, Slimzee already had the VIP of the VIP. The 10 best lectures on electronic music ever; watch them now Thanks to the wonders of the internet, one’s quest for knowledge really has no limitations. Between the plethora of digitized articles, documentaries, and—on the technical side of things—instructional videos and guides around, there is no shortage of information accessible to those who seek to learn more about the ever-expanding world of electronic music. The lecture, however, makes for a unique form of information sharing as it not only provides the necessary facts and details, but also allows for attendees (and, eventually, viewers) to get a sense of the person behind these facets of knowledge. With that in mind, Beatport News has compiled what we believe are 10 amazing lectures on electronic music, gathering videos from modern innovators, dance music originators, technical wizards, and a few that simply capture a time and place in electronic music too perfectly to overlook.

Ten Tips For Better Drums Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Bruce Aisher runs through ten essential tips for getting the most from your drums. Sub-mix Compression Five Creative Uses Of Loudspeakers That Can Enhance Recordings 1) Adding More Snares to Snare Drums If you’re presented with an “inherited recording” to mix (one you didn’t engineer) with live drums where no bottom mic was used on the snare drum, or the track sheet says “snare” but all you’ve got to work with is a dull thump, try this: Route an aux send bus output from your mixing console to a small powered loudspeaker (or, if you have an extra power amp, a regular small passive loudspeaker) you’ve placed out in the studio room or vocal booth. I’ve done this, putting my small, powered 5-inch Yamaha loudspeaker right on top of a decent sounding snare drum sitting on its stand. Use a spacer so the loudspeaker itself does not dampen the snare drum head too much. I used the plastic protective ring from a 2-inch reel of tape for a spacer, strapping it and the loudspeaker down to the drum’s shell with gaffer’s tape. Then I put my favorite bottom snare drum mic on the bottom, and brought it up in the mix on another mic input fader.

Proper Audio Recording Levels NOTICE: If you don't want to read any this or just don't care to understand it, there's a "dumbed down" version at the bottom. Let me get something out of the way here - I'm going to try to keep this very "fool proof" - I'm not trying to sound or present this very scientifically - This is just the rantings of hundreds and hundreds of posts on a dozen or more audio forums exploding like a volcano recorded with lots of headroom. I just hope to instill a basic understanding of why certain trends and common beliefs are just plain bad.

Subtractive vs Additive EQ: The Ultimate Showdown It’s confusing, isn’t it? Here you are, trying to learn about EQ and all the different and wonderful things you can do with these little devices – and somehow, it seems like the whole world is against you. It’s not that you can’t find any tips on what an EQ is, or what it can do for your music. It’s not even that you can’t find any instruction as to how you should use equalization, or in what context it should be used. No, no.

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