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Learning English Grammar

Learning English Grammar
The Tiny TEFL Teacher HomeTeach EnglishLearn EnglishAbout the TTT Learning EnglishGrammar RulesGrammar Exercises:▼ Tenses ▼ Futures ▼ Conditionals▼ Relative Clauses▼ Passives▼ Reported Speech▼ Questions▼ Articles▼ Adjectives ▼ Modal Verbs▼ Gerunds/InfinitivesGrammar TermsVocabularyPrepositionsFCE practice Online English Grammar Practice There are three ways to use the grammar information on these pages. If you just want to do grammar exercises, click on the links below to practise the grammar immediately Click here to read and learn about the grammar before you practise it.If you are thinking "What's the present perfect?" Tenses - practice Futures - practice Conditionals - practice Relative Clauses - practice Passives - practice Reported Speech - practice Questions - practice Articles - practice Adjectives - practice Modal Verbs - practice Verb Patterns (Gerunds and Infinitives) - practice Sponsors

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Make, do, have, take FCE (First Certificate) Collocations make, do, have and take There are some general rules for this, but mainly you need to remember lots of fixed expressions. English grammar: A complete guide Do you have a question about the correct usage of the semi-colon or how to place relative adverbs in a sentence? If so, you've come to the right place! The edufind.com English grammar guide is a complete reference on the rules of English usage. Every grammatical rule is explained in clear, simple language with several examples and, when necessary, counter-examples. The grammatical rules covered by this guide are categorized by part of speech. Linking Words — A complete List of English Connecting Words Linking & Connecting Words It is essential to understand how Linking Words, as a part of speech, can be used to combine ideas in writing - and thus ensure that ideas within sentences and paragraphs are elegantly connected - for the benefit of the reader. This will help to improve your writing (e.g. essay, comment, summary (scientific) review, (research) paper, letter, abstract, report, thesis, etc.).

Of Character Voices & Slang In essence, a character "voice" is the style and manner in which a character speaks. There are four primary components to a character's voice, which are: There are many reasons and ways to shake up and variate your character's voices. Read on to learn more! Why you should care about giving your characters distinct voices. Making distinct character voices is important for many reasons - the first being believability and realism.

Educational Technology and Mobile Learning: 3 Awesome Grammar Visuals to Use in Class June 21, 2014 There is a heated discussion around the teaching of grammar between two main camps. On the one hand, proponents of the "back to basics" movement argue that grammar is the backbone of language teaching and as such it should be given priority in terms of teaching grammatical structures explicitly through language activities and exercises that are designed purposefully to target these structures in a mechanical way. On the other hand, progressivists have a different take on this. They view grammar teaching and and literacy teaching in general as part and parcel of a natural process of learning that resembles kids learning of their mother tongues. They claim that through engaging learners in meaningfully authentic activities, kids get to learn more effectively than is the case through mechanical drilling advocated by the traditionalists. I personally do not see the effectiveness of any one approach per se in the teaching of grammar.

timelines Timelines for teaching verb tenses are great. Seriously. I’ve been telling teachers to use timelines for as long as I can remember, but, strangely enough, they’ve often played a lesser role in my own classroom practice. I believe this has a lot to do with my baffling inability to make sense of anything that bears the slightest resemblance to a map or a diagram. Now, what do the poor students have to do with that? Nothing, of course.

Irregular Verbs — Exercise 1 Directions: In the exercise that follows, you will read sentences that contain blanks. These blanks require the appropriate forms of irregular verbs. To keep track of your answers, print the accompanying handout. If you are unsure which choice to make, consult the rules. Disclaimer: All prizes in this exercise are cyber, which means they have no physical reality and cannot be collected for use in the material world.

Transition Words & Phrases Transition Words and Phrases This structured list of commonly used English transition words — approximately 200, can be considered as quasi complete. It can be used (by students and teachers alike) to find the right expression. English transition words are essential, since they not only connect ideas, but also can introduce a certain shift, contrast or opposition, emphasis or agreement, purpose, result or conclusion, etc. in the line of argument. The transition words and phrases have been assigned only once to somewhat artificial categories, although some words belong to more than one category. There is some overlapping with preposition and postposition, but for the purpose of clarity and completeness of this concise guide, I did not differentiate.

Phrases You Use Without Realizing You’re Quoting Shakespeare William Shakespeare devised new words and countless plot tropes that still appear in everyday life. Famous quotes from his plays are easily recognizable; phrases like “To be or not to be,” “wherefore art thou Romeo,” and “et tu, Brute?” instantly evoke images of wooden stages and Elizabethan costumes.

Gerunds and infinitives: Farmer Jones and his wife Gerunds and infinitives: Farmer Jones and his wife Submitted by admin on 1 July, 2009 - 13:58 This activity looks at the problem of whether verbs are followed by the gerund or infinitive. At Upper Intermediate level (B2 on the CEF level and FCE Cambridge exams) students are confronted with this problem and it is often useful to practise more thoroughly to help the difference in meaning of the verbs become part of the learners’ active knowledge. After the straightforward rules for verbs like manage (infinitive) and enjoy (gerund) it can be quite difficult for students to grasp the difference in meaning between a verb like try which can be followed by both, but with different meanings.

Clear Communication Introduction to Plain Language at NIH Plain language is grammatically correct language that includes complete sentence structure and accurate word usage. Plain language is not unprofessional writing or a method of "dumbing down" or "talking down" to the reader.

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