background preloader

Voice in Writing: Developing a Unique Writing Voice

Voice in Writing: Developing a Unique Writing Voice
Finding a writing voice can be a struggle, whether you’re writing a novel, short story, flash fiction or a blog post. Some may even wonder, what is voice in writing? A writer’s voice is something uniquely their own. It makes their work pop, plus readers recognize the familiarity. You would be able to identify the difference between Tolkien and Hemingway, wouldn’t you? It’s the way they write; their voice, in writing, is as natural as everyone’s speaking voice. When you find that unique voice, you might not even be able to explain how it came about—let alone describe what it is. “I am looking for authors with a distinctive voice.” What the heck is “voice”? How can you develop your voice? You can facilitate voice by giving yourself the freedom to say things in your own unique way. Science fiction writer Neal Stephenson has a unique voice. The Deliverator’s car has enough potential energy packed into its batteries to fire a pound of bacon into the Asteroid Belt. Oho. You might also like:

http://www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/there-are-no-rules/voice-in-writing-developing-a-unique-writing-voice

Related:  Two VoicesVoicePoint of viewdianemarycowan3

Choosing a Viewpoint Character In most cases, the viewpoint character of a novel (the one whose eyes we witness the events through) is the same person as the novel's protagonist (the central character, or the one the whole novel is "about"). (You will find an article on choosing the protagonist in the section on Creating Characters. For most novels, though, the choice is an obvious one. In fact, the central character is often the spark that ignites the novel in the first place.) Flirting and Writing Dialogue I love exposition: flowing sentences, tight action, enveloping description. Prose is great. But for the past couple of weeks, I’ve been wondering what makes dialogue tick. Well-written dialogue is not conversation. Have you ever listened to the way people speak? Our conversations (regardless of our erudition) are almost always inane.

Narrative mode The narrative mode (also known as the mode of narration) is the set of methods the author of a literary, theatrical, cinematic, or musical story uses to convey the plot to the audience. Narration, the process of presenting the narrative, occurs because of the narrative mode. It encompasses several overlapping areas, most importantly narrative point-of-view, which determines through whose perspective the story is viewed and narrative voice, which determines a set of consistent features regarding the way through which the story is communicated to the audience. Narrative mode is a literary element.

Important Writing Lessons From First-Time Novelists KIRA PEIKOFF (kirapeikoff.com) is the author of the acclaimed thriller Living Proof (Tor Books). She holds a bachelor’s degree in journalism from New York University and is a candidate for a Master of Science in bioethics at Columbia. She has written for The Daily News, Newsday, The Orange County Register and New York magazine. The 7 Narrator Types: and You Thought There Were Only Two! - bekindrewrite Photo by Charles Hutchins There are all kinds of narrators–going way beyond simple first or third person. Here’s a little study of the different types. First Person Words and Phrases Coined by Shakespeare Words and Phrases Coined by Shakespeare NOTE: This list (including some of the errors I originally made) is found in several other places online. That's fine, but I've asked that folks who want this on their own sites mention that I am the original compiler. For many English-speakers, the following phrases are familiar enough to be considered common expressions, proverbs, and/or clichés. All of them originated with or were popularized by Shakespeare. I compiled these from multiple sources online in 2003.

Point of View: 1st, 2nd & 3rd Person Narrative Viewpoints, Literature Advice on how to choose between first person, second person, 3rd person point of view and more! By Brian Klems, Online Editor Tools in the Writer's Craft: Character, Emotion and Viewpoint Buy Me! Of all the decisions you need to make when crafting a novel, choosing the point of view from which you tell your story is one of the most important. There are so many options to consider--first person point of view, second person point of view, third person limited point of view, etc.

Psychologists Discover How People Subconsciously Become Their Favorite Fictional Characters Psychologists have discovered that while reading a book or story, people are prone to subconsciously adopt their behavior, thoughts, beliefs and internal responses to that of fictional characters as if they were their own. Experts have dubbed this subconscious phenomenon ‘experience-taking,’ where people actually change their own behaviors and thoughts to match those of a fictional character that they can identify with. Researcher from the Ohio State University conducted a series of six different experiments on about 500 participants, reporting in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, found that in the right situations, ‘experience-taking,’ may lead to temporary real world changes in the lives of readers. They found that stories written in the first-person can temporarily transform the way readers view the world, themselves and other social groups. "Experience-taking is much more immersive -- you've replaced yourself with the other," Libby said in a statement.

Empowering Writers "Teaching Voice in Writing" - Empowering Writers We’ve all heard teachers talk about “voice” – how a piece of writing somehow has it – or doesn’t. Often referred to as “author’s voice, it is a frequently misunderstood concept, an illusive quality that often seems difficult, if not impossible to teach. In fact, some people feel that authors are either blessed with the gift of “voice” or not, or they believe that writers can only discover their voice through writing a lot.

Strong Authorial Voice By Nicholas So you've got a great novel in the works. It's got everything your audience could ask for - orcs and goblins, champions and villains, flashy adventures and passionate romance. Unreliable narrator An unreliable narrator is a narrator, whether in literature, film, or theatre, whose credibility has been seriously compromised.[1] The term was coined in 1961 by Wayne C. Booth in The Rhetoric of Fiction.[1][2] While unreliable narrators are almost by definition first-person narrators, arguments have been made for the existence of unreliable second- and third-person narrators, especially within the context of film and televison. An exception is an event that did not or could not happen, told within the fictionalized historical novels, speculative fiction, or clearly delineated dream sequences. Narrators describing them are not considered unreliable. Overview[edit]

Related: