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Common English usage misconceptions

Common English usage misconceptions
This list comprises widespread modern beliefs about English language usage that are documented by a reliable source to be myths or misconceptions. With no authoritative language academy, English is not a prescriptive language. Therefore, guidance on English language usage can come from many sources. This can create problems as described by Reginald Close: Teachers and textbook writers often invent rules which their students and readers repeat and perpetuate. These rules are usually statements about English usage which the authors imagine to be, as a rule, true. Perceived usage and grammar violations elicit visceral reactions in many people. Grammar[edit] Misconception: A sentence must not end in a preposition.[3][4][5] Mignon Fogarty ("Grammar Girl") says, "nearly all grammarians agree that it's fine to end sentences with prepositions, at least in some cases Misconception: Infinitives must not be split. Misconception: The words "and" and "but" must not begin a sentence. Typography[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_English_usage_misconceptions

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