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The Passive Voice

The Passive Voice
Passive and Active Voices Verbs are also said to be either active (The executive committee approved the new policy) or passive (The new policy was approved by the executive committee) in voice. In the active voice, the subject and verb relationship is straightforward: the subject is a be-er or a do-er and the verb moves the sentence along. In the passive voice, the subject of the sentence is neither a do-er or a be-er, but is acted upon by some other agent or by something unnamed (The new policy was approved). Computerized grammar checkers can pick out a passive voice construction from miles away and ask you to revise it to a more active construction. There is nothing inherently wrong with the passive voice, but if you can say the same thing in the active mode, do so (see exceptions below). use the passive voice to avoid responsibility for actions taken. Take the quiz (below) as an exercise in recognizing and changing passive verbs. Passive Verb Formation Verbals in Passive Structures

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Word classes To discuss accuracy and style at the sentence level, we need to be able refer to the different word classes, or parts of speech (verb, noun, adjective, adverb, linker/ conjunction, etc.) we use in sentences. nouns give names to ideas, people, objects and actions verbs give meanings to sentences by telling us what things do, or what they are adjectives describe ideas, people, objects and actions, in other words, nouns and pronouns adverbs describe verbs and adjectives determiners (including articles) tell us which noun is being referred to prepositions show the relationship between nouns and other parts of the sentence linkers (or conjunctions) join similar parts of speech or whole clauses Questions about word classes Sometimes words have more than one meaning and fit into more than one category. Question about words which are in more than one class

Strong Authorial Voice By Nicholas So you've got a great novel in the works. It's got everything your audience could ask for - orcs and goblins, champions and villains, flashy adventures and passionate romance. Now the question is not what to write but how to write it; now comes the question of voice. Voice, like personality, is a nebulous term, and it has as many facets.

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Grammatical Conversion in English: Converting Words Into Other Parts of Speech written by: Heather Marie Kosur • edited by: Rebecca Scudder • updated: 12/10/2013 Part two of "Word Formation: Creating New Words in English" covers the process of conversion, which is the word formation process whereby a word of one part of speech converts into a word of another part of speech, e.g., the noun Google changing into the verb to google. ConversionConversion is the word formation process in which a word of one grammatical form becomes a word of another grammatical form without any changes to spelling or pronunciation.

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