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50 Most Challenging Words

50 Most Challenging Words
Back in 2010 The New York Times published a list of 50 fancy words that most frequently stump their readership. The New York Times 50 Fancy Words (defined and used) 1. Inchoate: just begun and so not fully formed or developed I am glad your inchoate proposals for integrating the company were not accepted this time, thus saving us face. 2. Anderson’s profligacy cost him his job and its better you tighten up your belt before you go the same way. 3. Mr. 4. Every major war on this planet were followed by many years of austerity. 5. The firm’s profligate spending only hastened its downfall. 6. Humpty Dumpty’s antics remain a constant source of baldenfreude for children and adults alike. 7. His ludicrous attempts at mimicry in the office only earned him the opprobrium of his colleagues. 8. The millionaire technocrat and his cronies were publicly derided for being apostates, after they were exposed of polluting the environment while purporting to have spent large sums for water conservation. 9. 10. 11.

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Transitional Words & Phrases Using transitional words and phraseshelps papers read more smoothly, and at the same time allows the reader to flow more smoothly from one point to the next. Transitions enhance logical organization and understandabilityand improve the connections between thoughts. They indicate relations,whether within a sentence, paragraph, or paper. This list illustrates categories of "relationships" between ideas,followed by words and phrases that can make the connections: 45 ways to avoid using the word 'very' A posthaven user upvoted this post. — habebaakiar 3 years ago — barcahaters 3 years ago — Jan Arzooman 3 years ago — Y.Babadogan 3 years ago — Malcolm Birdsall 3 years ago 20 more awesomely untranslatable words from around the world If only you could use these words in Scrabble. Photo: Jeremy Mates When linguists refer to “untranslatable” words, the idea is not that a word cannot somehow be explained in another language, but that part of the essence of the word is lost as it crosses from one language to another. This often is due to different social and cultural contexts that have shaped how the word is used. In the novel Shame, Salman Rushdie’s narrator suggests: “To unlock a society, look at its untranslatable words.”

Exquisite Adjectives By Mark Nichol Adjectives — descriptive words that modify nouns — often come under fire for their cluttering quality, but often it’s quality, not quantity, that is the issue. Plenty of tired adjectives are available to spoil a good sentence, but when you find just the right word for the job, enrichment ensues. Practice precision when you select words. Here’s a list of adjectives: Free Word Cloud Generator Word clouds can be extremely useful for gaining insights into virtually any large body of text. They can be used to study such things as corporate reports, political speeches, historical documents, news reports, public opinions, tweets, and so forth. This particular word cloud generator is designed to be not only flexible and easy-to-use, but also to produce high-quality, visually appealing word cloud images. In the images created by this word cloud generator you will find that the most frequently occurring words within your text appear toward the center of the cloud, while less frequent words appear at the periphery. You will also notice that the size of each word varies in direct proportion to the frequency with which it appears in your text. This means that the most frequently occurring words are drawn using a larger font size than those words that appear less frequently.

Synonyms for words commonly used in student's writing Amazing- incredible, unbelievable, improbable, fabulous, wonderful, fantastic, astonishing, astounding, extraordinary Anger- enrage, infuriate, arouse, nettle, exasperate, inflame, madden Angry- mad, furious, enraged, excited, wrathful, indignant, exasperated, aroused, inflamed 7 Beautiful Words With No Direct English Translation You know that feeling you get when surrounded by close friends or family -- perhaps gathered around a fireplace after a meal, or chatting on the couch in your pajamas on a Sunday morning? There truly is no word to describe it. Or at least not in English. How to Punctuate Dialogue December 8, 2010 by Fiction Editor Beth Hill last modified December 12, 2012 Dialogue has its own rules for punctuation. Commas go in particular places, as do terminal marks such as periods and question marks.

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