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Bloom's Taxonomy of Learning Domains

Bloom's Taxonomy of Learning Domains
Bloom's Taxonomy was created in 1956 under the leadership of educational psychologist Dr Benjamin Bloom in order to promote higher forms of thinking in education, such as analyzing and evaluating concepts, processes, procedures, and principles, rather than just remembering facts (rote learning). It is most often used when designing educational, training, and learning processes. The Three Domains of Learning The committee identified three domains of educational activities or learning (Bloom, et al. 1956): Cognitive: mental skills (knowledge) Affective: growth in feelings or emotional areas (attitude or self) Psychomotor: manual or physical skills (skills) Since the work was produced by higher education, the words tend to be a little bigger than we normally use. While the committee produced an elaborate compilation for the cognitive and affective domains, they omitted the psychomotor domain. Cognitive Domain Knowledge Comprehension Application Analysis Synthesis Evaluation Next Steps Review

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K-5 iPad Apps According to Bloom's Taxonomy An elementary library media specialist reviews iPad apps as they map to an updated version of Bloom's Taxonomy in this six-part series. Diane Darrow is an artist, Reading Recovery teacher, and library media specialist at Bel Aire Elementary in Tiburon, CA. You can follow her on Twitter at @dianedarrow. Allan's Blog Powered by Traduttore When I received the invitation from the new Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine at the Nanyang Technological University in Singapore, I decided to completely upgrade two seminar workshops. Dr Ian Green from the School of Education here at Adelaide and I have used Padagogy101 (introduction to iPad in HE) and Padagogy201 (more advanced use for L&T) to train over 600 faculty from universities in Australia. For Singapore, Ian wasn’t going to be with me and I was solo, as well I needed a better way to leave resources in place for people to revisit.

The Best Resources For Helping Teachers Use Bloom’s Taxonomy In The Classroom Bloom’s Taxonomy is talked about a lot in educational circles. However, if you believe a recent survey of visits to 23,000 U.S. classrooms, the higher-order thinking skills it’s ideally designed to promote doesn’t get much use. And I can understand why. It’s easy to get caught-up in the day-to-day work involved in teaching a class or multiple classes, and it’s easy to fall into the trap of doing the “usual stuff” and not “think out of the box.” I thought it might be useful to share in a “The Best…” list the resources that help me try to use Bloom’s Taxonomy in my classroom.

Bloom's Digital Taxonomy This is the introduction to Bloom's Digital Taxonomy. The different taxonomical levels can be viewed individually via the navigation bar or below this introduction as embedded pages. This is an update to Bloom's Revised Taxonomy which attempts to account for the new behaviours and actions emerging as technology advances and becomes more ubiquitous. Bloom's Revised Taxonomy describes many traditional classroom practices, behaviours and actions, but does not account for the new processes and actions associated with Web 2.0 technologies, infowhelm (the exponential growth in information), increasing ubiquitous personal technologies or cloud computing.Bloom's Digital Taxonomy isn't about the tools or technologies rather it is about using these to facilitate learning.

The Four Quadrant Model of the Brain Ned Herrmann's Whole Brain Model Diagram from Models of the Brain - Theories of Brain Organisation by Charles Cave Ned Herrmann combined the Triune Brain model of Paul McLean with the Left/Right Brain hemisphere theory of Roger Sperry to form a model of the human brain with two paired structures, the two halves of the cerebral system and the two halves of the limbic system. (the basal or Reptilian brain being not included in this model, or else include along with the Limbic). This adds to the celebral cognitive/intellectual polarity of left-right a limbic visceral, structured and emotional polarity of left-right. Bloom's Taxonomy Resources Bloom’s Taxonomy can be a powerful tool to transform teaching and learning. By design, it focuses attention away from content and instruction, and instead emphasizes the “cognitive events” in the mind of a child. And this is no small change.

Bloom’s Taxonomy & The iPad The iPad – A Device To… Create Despite Steve Jobs having declared the iPad as a device for consuming media, students at Zeeland Public Schools (ZPS) continue to create engaging papers, presentations and multi-media products to demonstrate their deep understanding of the curriculum. Pic Collage, Story Creator, Corkulous, Scribble Press, Videolicious, Educreations, Evernote, Haiku Deck, and iMotion HD are just a small sampling of the amazing apps students at every grade level are using to synthesize their understanding. Definitions of Bloom's Taxonomy Activities at Various Cognitive Levels of Learning (LoL) Bloom’s taxonomy of learning objectives is used to define how well a skill or competency is learned or mastered. A fuller description of Bloom’s taxonomy is given in the following pages but a brief summary of the activities associated with each level is given below.

SOLO Taxonomy click to view a bigger version As learning progresses it becomes more complex. SOLO, which stands for the Structure of the Observed Learning Outcome, is a means of classifying learning outcomes in terms of their complexity, enabling us to assess students’ work in terms of its quality not of how many bits of this and of that they have got right. At first we pick up only one or few aspects of the task (unistructural), then several aspects but they are unrelated (multistructural), then we learn how to integrate them into a whole (relational), and finally, we are able to generalised that whole to as yet untaught applications (extended abstract).

Howard Gardner's Multiple Intelligences Howard Gardner theorized that there are multiple intelligences, and that we all use one or two for the most effective learning. Our culture teaches, tests, reinforces and rewards primarily two kinds of intelligence: verbal/linguistic and logical/mathematical. His theory proposes that there are at least eight other kinds of intelligence that are equally important.

Using Instagram, Bloom’s Taxonomy & Student Interest As A Fun Part Of A Semester Final I’ve previously posted about some elements in my upcoming finals (see My Best Posts On Writing Instruction and scroll down near the bottom). Another element I’m trying out this year is having students in all my classes create Instagrams (see other ways I’ve used Instagram and Vine in my classes at The Best Resources For Learning To Use The Video Apps “Vine” & Instagram). They’ll all be somewhat different: * My ninth-grade English students will identify questions (following some lessons on Bloom’s Taxonomy) they still have about the units we’ve studied this year and find the answers to them. * Intermediate English students will be choosing questions related to the English language.

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