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SOLO taxonomy explained using Lego

SOLO taxonomy explained using Lego

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uDXXV-mCLPg

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SOLO Taxonomy click to view a bigger version As learning progresses it becomes more complex. SOLO, which stands for the Structure of the Observed Learning Outcome, is a means of classifying learning outcomes in terms of their complexity, enabling us to assess students’ work in terms of its quality not of how many bits of this and of that they have got right. At first we pick up only one or few aspects of the task (unistructural), then several aspects but they are unrelated (multistructural), then we learn how to integrate them into a whole (relational), and finally, we are able to generalised that whole to as yet untaught applications (extended abstract). The diagram lists verbs typical of each such level. SOLO can be used not only in assessment, but in designing the curriculum in terms of the learning outcomes intended, which is helpful in implementing constructive alignment.

The Five Habits of Creative Teachers - Education Week Teacher Published Online: August 19, 2014 By Cathleen Nardi, Melissa Goodwin, Tracee Vetting Wolf, Strawberry-Blue Olive, and Maureen Maher Wizel Ken Robinson’s renowned TED talk, “How Schools Kill Creativity,” has had 27 million views. To date, it is the most-watched TED talk of all time.

Going SOLO: An introduction to the taxonomy everyone’s talking about This article originally appeared in Innovate My School's September 2012 digital magazine. The Structure of Observed Learning Outcome (SOLO) taxonomy aims to show pupils how to develop sophisticated responses to questions by getting them to examine their thought-process as their understanding of a topic improves. I began using SOLO in 2011, and it is now integral to my teaching. SOLO Taxonomy: giving students a sense of progress in learning Without a sense of progress you cannot be creative, so what language can we offer students that enables them to take control of understanding where they are in their learning? One key notion about creativity is that the ability to calculate progress is an important part of the creative process: knowing when something feels 'done'. Knowing when you're stuck, when you're done, when you're at the end of that chunk of learning is essential. It gives that indication that you need to go back out and get some more insights from someone or something.

Lessons & Classroom Games for Teachers - Animal Crime Scene Investigator - A science and ESL lesson by: Regal Swan® Foundation, Inc. / theregalswan.com Expected Learning Outcomes Students will understand predation and how nature controls the over-population of species. Students will have an understanding of how crime scene investigation requires the.. TUMMY RUB, HEAD PAT - Game by: re Try to pat your head with one hand while rubbing your stomach in circular motions with the other hand. The Periodic Table Of How Kids Play It used to be that play was just play. There wasn’t a whole lot to say about it. Kids climbed trees, hit balls, and did experiments on insects. But by the mid-20th century, children’s play was being extensively studied, classified, and taxonomied by pioneering psychologists such as Melanie Klein and D.W.

SOLO Taxonomy SOLO Taxonomy (structure of observed learning outcomes) provides a simple, reliable and robust model for three levels of understanding – surface deep and conceptual (Biggs and Collis 1982). At the prestructural level of understanding (Whakarangaranga), the task is inappropriately attacked, and the student has missed the point or needs help to start. The next two levels, unistructural and multistructural are associated with bringing in information (surface understanding). At the unistructural level (Rangaranga Takitahi), one aspect of the task is picked up, and student understanding is disconnected and limited.

Bloom's Digital Taxonomy This is the introduction to Bloom's Digital Taxonomy. The different taxonomical levels can be viewed individually via the navigation bar or below this introduction as embedded pages. This is an update to Bloom's Revised Taxonomy which attempts to account for the new behaviours and actions emerging as technology advances and becomes more ubiquitous. Bloom's Revised Taxonomy describes many traditional classroom practices, behaviours and actions, but does not account for the new processes and actions associated with Web 2.0 technologies, infowhelm (the exponential growth in information), increasing ubiquitous personal technologies or cloud computing.Bloom's Digital Taxonomy isn't about the tools or technologies rather it is about using these to facilitate learning. Outcomes on rubrics are measured by competence of use and most importantly the quality of the process or product. For example.

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