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Web-based Version of Blooms Taxonomy (30+ digital tools )

Web-based Version of Blooms Taxonomy (30+ digital tools )

Awesome Poster on Bloom's Revised Taxonomy Our Bloom's Taxonomy section here in Educational Technology and Mobile Learning is growing richer in materials and resources. I am so grateful to everyone of you for generously contributing with your ideas and links. I just got this poster from a fellow teacher featuring the 6 thinking skills as outlined in the revised taxonomy. I will let you have a look at this awesome revised taxonomy poster and looking forward to your comments and feedback.

Taxonomy of Reflection Inside Academic Technologies Blooms, SAMR & the 3 C's - iSupport All the apps you’ll ever need As I prepared for an upcoming presentation at a local University I unloaded my test iPad of all its applications and created a new iPad, complete only with apps which I use at school every week. This iPad would become my “essentials” iPad, strategically and efficiently full of apps I wholly recommend to every educator I meet. I went through the apps and I developed a list, indicating the apps purpose. I found that these purposes consistently fell into 3 categories: Consumption, Creation and Collaboration. I found I had many educational gaming type apps (gamification of learning) which fitted into the Consumption category. Today I chose to focus on these 3 “C’s” activities, and it was clear that they could be easily aligned to Blooms Taxonomy objectives. When you are considering your teaching tool kit, consider a concise balance between these apps. Which apps are you consuming (researching, learning specific facts) with?

Educational Technology and Mobile Learning: 20 Great Rubrics for Integrating Bloom's Digital Taxonomy in Your Teaching June 15, 2014 I have always been inspired by the great work of Andrew Church. This guy has been one of my authority sources for everything related to Bloom's digital taxonomy. Andrew provided a detailed account of how teachers can align the thinking levels of Bloom's original taxonomy with the different digital tools. I have already shared here several examples of web tools and mobile apps that can be used to promote Bloom's digital thinking skills; but today I am sharing with you some wonderful rubrics to help you integrate Bloom's digital taxonomy into your teaching. These rubrics are designed by Andrew Church and are available for free download from this page. Each of these rubrics is related to a tinkling stage of Bloom's taxonomy. Here is a quick round-up of all the Bloom's digital taxonomy rubrics created by Andrew: Remembering:

35 Digital Tools That Work With Bloom's Taxonomy Integrating technology in the classroom and engaging students in higher order thinking creates the ultimate learning experience for students. Bloom’s Taxonomy and digital tools creates an innovative learning environment where students are engaged in their assignments. The following is a list of digital tools as it relates to Bloom’s Taxonomy. 1. Creating – In creating, students create projects that involve video editing, storytelling, video casting, podcasting, and animating. For a sample lesson using digital tools with the levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy visit my post at: .

How They Get It: A New, Simple Taxonomy For Understanding How They Get It: A New, Simple Taxonomy For Understanding by Terry Heick How can you tell if a student really understands something? They learn early on to fake understanding exceptionally well, and even the best assessment leaves something on the table. (In truth, a big portion of the time students simply don’t know what they don’t know.) The idea of understanding is, of course, at the heart of all learning, and solving it as a puzzle is one of the three pillars of formal learning environments and education. 1. 2. 3. But how do we know if they know it? Understanding As “It” On the surface, there is trouble with the word “it.” “It” is essentially what is to be learned, and it can be scary thing to both teachers and students. And in terms of content, “it” could be almost anything: a fact, a discovery, a habit, skill, or general concept, from a mathematical theory to a scientific process, the importance of a historical figure to an author’s purpose in a text. How It Works Early Understanding 1.

The Teacher's Guides To Technology And Learning Welcome to the official guide to technology and learning by Edudemic! This part of Edudemic is meant to offer you, the teacher, some of the best and most popular resources available today. We’ve combed through hundreds of resources in order to narrow down our guides into something easy to read, easy to use, and easy to share. Below are links to the guides we have made so far. They’re always a work in progress so be sure to let us know if we missed something or if you have more resources you want us to call out in the guides. Just click on the title or image of each guide to view that particular resource. The Teacher’s Guide To Twitter Twitter has proven itself to be an indispensable tool for educators around the globe. The Teacher’s Guide To Flipped Classrooms We talk a lot about flipped classrooms on Edudemic. The Teacher’s Guide To Copyright And Fair Use The Teacher’s Guide To Google Glass If you’re as excited as Katie and me about Google Glass, this guide is for you. Do you love to pin?

A New Fantastic Bloom's Taxonomy Wheel for iPad Apps March 21, 2014 Today while I was browsing through my Twitter feeds I came across this fabulous Bloom's Taxonomy wheel of apps shared by Anthony. If you still recall, some previous versions of this wheel have already been featured here in Bloom's Taxonomy for Teachers section . As you can see, the wheel outlines a wide variety of verbs and activities related to each thinking level of Blooms taxonomy coupled with iPad apps that go with it. These apps are supposed to help teachers and students better cultivate these different thinking levels in their use of iPad apps. Create Evaluate Annalyse Apply Remember/understand This wheel is originally discovered on the website of Paul Hopkin's education consultancy site mmiweb.org.uk adopted by Allan Carrington.

Communicate, Collect & Collaborate with Sticky Notes Transcript This is the Learning in Hand podcast. I'm Tony Vincent and this is the show where I share tips, how-tos, and ideas for using today's digital tools for teaching and learning. Episode 26: Communicate, Collect & Collaborate with Sticky Notes, recorded May 2013, happens now! I like digital tools that work on many different kinds of devices. I also like tools that don't require students to sign in. So, have you ever given each student a Post-It note to stick to a wall to gather ideas? For example, Steve Kirkpatrick's elementary students in Salford, U.K. posted to their Dinosaur Question Wall. Kathleen McGready's second grade students contributed to a wall to share what they learned after their dinosaur unit. And, Mr. Padlet calls the virtual bulletin board a wall. I'll talk about setting up your own wall or canvas shortly, but here's how a student contributes to one. Digital sticky notes don't have to be limited to text. Here are some of them…. You can change the layout.

Bloom's Taxonomy Bloom's wheel, according to the Bloom's verbs and matching assessment types. The verbs are intended to be feasible and measurable. Bloom's taxonomy is a classification of learning objectives within education. It is named for Benjamin Bloom, who chaired the committee of educators that devised the taxonomy, and who also edited the first volume of the standard text, Taxonomy of Educational Objectives: The Classification of Educational Goals. Bloom's taxonomy refers to a classification of the different objectives that educators set for students (learning objectives). Bloom's taxonomy is considered to be a foundational and essential element within the education community. History[edit] Although named after Bloom, the publication of Taxonomy of Educational Objectives followed a series of conferences from 1949 to 1953, which were designed to improve communication between educators on the design of curricula and examinations. Cognitive[edit] Knowledge[edit] Comprehension[edit] Application[edit]

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