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The History and Geography of Inventions

The History and Geography of Inventions
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Important American Historical Figures In this two-day lesson plan, students will first discuss the qualities and criteria that make for the most important American Historical figure. Students will draw a historical figure out of a hat and then spend the remainder of class period researching sixteen major facts to support their figure as the “Champion of American History.” Day two will be spent as a playoff in front of the class to see who is the “Champion of American History.” Historical Figures have been provided, but the list may be modified to reflect recent class learning, unit objectives, or be a student-driven and created list (this may lead to more modern figures being added). Objectives: The Students will Identify key criteria they can use to measure historical figures against each other in this competition.Collect material from a variety of sources (internet and textbook-based) to defend their historical figure.

Epicurus Epicurus (/ˌɛpɪˈkjʊərəs/ or /ˌɛpɪˈkjɔːrəs/;[2] Greek: Ἐπίκουρος, Epíkouros, "ally, comrade"; 341–270 BC) was an ancient Greek philosopher as well as the founder of the school of philosophy called Epicureanism. Only a few fragments and letters of Epicurus's 300 written works remain. Much of what is known about Epicurean philosophy derives from later followers and commentators. For Epicurus, the purpose of philosophy was to attain the happy, tranquil life, characterized by ataraxia—peace and freedom from fear—and aponia—the absence of pain—and by living a self-sufficient life surrounded by friends. He taught that pleasure and pain are the measures of what is good and evil; death is the end of both body and soul and should therefore not be feared; the gods neither reward nor punish humans; the universe is infinite and eternal; and events in the world are ultimately based on the motions and interactions of atoms moving in empty space. Biography[edit]

German World War I Postcards Part I >> Part II German railway troops explore stretch of the railroad near Arras (Northern France). First spring days in Poland: Fishing in the carp pond on the Russian-Polish border. Hastily deserted Russian artillery position in Poland. Human cycles: History as science Sometimes, history really does seem to repeat itself. After the US Civil War, for example, a wave of urban violence fuelled by ethnic and class resentment swept across the country, peaking in about 1870. Internal strife spiked again in around 1920, when race riots, workers' strikes and a surge of anti-Communist feeling led many people to think that revolution was imminent. And in around 1970, unrest crested once more, with violent student demonstrations, political assassinations, riots and terrorism (see 'Cycles of violence').

Earth's Timeline Some of the boxes are named after places where the rocks were studied in detail (eg the Devonian after Devon). Because the world's surface plates are constantly moving, albeit very slowly, the rocks vary at different times. For example the Devonian sandstones of England represent a time when southern England was in the southern latitudes, near the area occupied by the Namibian deserts today. The Carboniferous rocks in England include coals deposited by vast forests when England lay on the Equator, and the Permian sandstones when we were at the latitude of the western Sahara.

German History in Documents and Images German History in Documents and Images (GHDI) is a comprehensive collection of primary source materials documenting Germany's political, social, and cultural history from 1500 to the present. It comprises original German texts, all of which are accompanied by new English translations, and a wide range of visual imagery. The materials are presented in ten sections, which have been compiled by leading scholars. All of the materials can be used free of charge for teaching, research, and related purposes; the site is strictly intended for individual, non-commercial use. Ichthyosaur Ichthyosaurs (Greek for "fish lizard" - ιχθυς or ichthys meaning "fish" and σαυρος or sauros meaning "lizard") were large marine reptiles. Ichthyosaurs belong to the order known as Ichthyosauria or Ichthyopterygia ('fish flippers' - a designation introduced by Sir Richard Owen in 1840, although the term is now used more for the parent clade of the Ichthyosauria). Science became aware of the existence of ichthyosaurs, during the early nineteenth century when the first complete skeletons were found in England. In 1834, the order Ichthyosauria was named.

Arms and Armor—Common Misconceptions and Frequently Asked Questions Parrying dagger (pugnale bolognese), ca. 1550–75 Italian Partly gilt steel, brass, and wood; Wt. 15 oz. (425 g) Gift of Jean Jacques Reubell, in memory of his mother, Julia C. Coster, and of his wife, Adeline E. Post, both of New York City, 1926 (26.145.94) The field of arms and armor is beset with romantic legends, gory myths, and widely held misconceptions. Eshnunna Coordinates: 33°29′3″N 44°43′42″E / 33.48417°N 44.72833°E / 33.48417; 44.72833 Eshnunna (modern Tell Asmar in Diyala Province, Iraq) was an ancient Sumerian (and later Akkadian) city and city-state in central Mesopotamia. Although situated in the Diyala Valley north-east of Sumer proper, the city nonetheless belonged securely within the Sumerian cultural milieu. The tutelary deity of the city was Tishpak (Tišpak). History[edit]

In Charted Waters - Evolution of the World Map as it was Explored Maps are among the most accessible assets we can use accurately, whether it’s an old print or the newest mobile app. Still, it took centuries for people to truly understand the geography of the world. Here, we show how our knowledge has grown and developed over time… Scroll to begin the journey Atlantic Ocean Digital Image Collection-Folger Shakespeare Library The Folger's Digital Image Collection offers online access to over 75,000 images from the Folger Shakespeare Library collection, including books, theater memorabilia, manuscripts, art, and more. Images are available in high resolution and users can show multiple images side-by-side, zoom in and out to see fine detail, view cataloging information when available, export thumbnails, and construct permanent URLs linking back to their favorite items or searches. Through the Digital Image Collection, you can: Compare 19th-century productions of Shakespeare with today's through historic photographs and promptbooks Look at letters written by Queen Elizabeth I Examine rare paintings in "up close and personal" detail Read diary entries from over 200 years ago and much more

Home - TimeSearch Search the Web through Timelines(and surprise yourself with what you find) Icons on the left link to Google or HistoryWorld (H) Yellow icons on the right link to related images in GoogleMove your pointer over an icon to see the search terms To start at Big Bang just click Go (above)To go to a specific period enter a year (above)For a more focused timeline use the Areas and Themes menus (top left) Or you may prefer Single-subject Timelines

Top 10 Fascinating Facts About The Romans History In the past we gave you a list of ten myths about the Romans. Today, to complement that list we are giving you ten facts. Roman society existed in one of the most fascinating periods of history. Many of the aspects of Roman life continue on to the present day and we certainly have a lot to thank them for in terms of culture and law and, of course, our calendar. This list looks at ten aspects of Roman life that are particularly interesting and (hopefully) not especially well known.