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How Far is it to Mars?

How Far is it to Mars?
If the Earth were 100 pixels wide, Low Earth Orbit Hubble & the ISS GPS Satellite Orbit 100 pixels (12,756km) The Moon would be 3000 pixels away.

http://www.distancetomars.com/

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Universe Today — Space and astronomy news The Falcon 9 and Dragon capsule stand ready for launch prior to the detection of a helium leak in one of the engines forcing a scrub of the launch attempt on April 14. 2014 – now reset to April 18, 2014. Credit: nasatech.net NASA and SpaceX are marching forward towards a Friday, April 18 liftoff attempt for the Falcon 9 rocket sending a commercial Dragon cargo craft on the company’s third resupply mission to the International Space Station following the scrubbed launch attempt on Monday, April 14 – forced by the discovery of a Helium gas leak inside the rocket during the latter stages of the countdown. An on time blastoff of the upgraded Falcon 9 sets the stage for an Easter Sunday rendezvous and berthing of the Dragon resupply spacecraft at the massive orbiting outpost packed with almost 5000 pounds of science experiments and supplies for the six person crew. However the weather prognosis is rather [click to continue…] The newly-confirmed extrasolar planet has been dubbed Kepler-186f.

Universe Sandbox A “sandbox” of the universe, allowing users to interact with and change almost any aspect of outer space while receiving detailed feedback on effects. Benefits of Play: Creativity, Innovation, Critical thinking, Content-specific Science, STEM, Educational Issue(s): scientific realism Talking Glossary of Genetic Terms Glossary Home | Text Version Designed to help learners at any level better understand genetic terms Guided by national science standards Explained by scientists at the NIH The National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) created the Talking Glossary of Genetic Terms to help everyone understand the terms and concepts used in genetic research. Beyond 2012: Why the World Didn't End Beyond 2012: Why the World Didn't End If you're reading this story, it means the world didn't end on Dec. 21, 2012. Despite reports of an ancient Maya prophecy, a mysterious planet on a collision course with Earth, or a reverse in Earth's rotation, we're still here.

Bill Gates’ Great-Great-Granddaughter’s Honeymoon: An Astronomy Activity for Several Different Age Groups When students finish a unit or course on the planets these days, they are often overwhelmed with facts, comparisons, and images. A good culminating activity, to help them organize their thinking (and review), is to have them divide into small groups (travel agencies) and come up with their top ten solar system “tourist sights” for future space vacationers, complete with images. The history of the activity and its variants, and resources to help instructors and students, are reviewed. KeywordsKeywords astronomy, educational courses Keywords 7-9 (or middle school), 10-12 (or high school), College non-majors, Solar system, K-12 curriculum development, Hands-on activities, Teaching approaches, Cooperative group activities, Laboratory exercises Keywords

Magnifying the Universe Embed this infographic on your site! <iframe width="500" height="323" scrolling="no" src=" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br />Copyright 2012. <a href=" the Universe</a> by <a href=" Sleuth</a>. The above is an interactive infographic. 50 Years of Incredible Space Images From the European Southern Observatory This week marks the 50th anniversary of one of the world’s leading astronomical institutions, the European Southern Observatory. In honor of ESO’s birthday, we take a look at some of its most stunning shots of the night sky, amazing objects in space, and the organization's beautiful telescope facilities. ESO started when astronomers from five European countries – Belgium, France, Germany, the Netherlands, and Sweden – came together on Oct. 5, 1962 to build a telescope in the Southern Hemisphere.

Seeing in the Dark . For Teachers When kids are asked for their favorite topics in science, astronomy (along with dinosaurs) is always high on the list. As a "gateway" to science education, astronomy is essential to the curriculum in many states and school districts. But even where astronomy is not required, it can often be a wonderful way to approach required science principles and ideas. Examples from astronomy can make vivid any general discussion of gravity and forces, of nuclear energy, of light and color, and of the nature of scientific hypotheses. (For a summary of astronomy in the K-8 science standards of the 50 states, see: As you explore the Seeing in the Dark website, be sure to take a look at the how-to videos for stargazing, print out a custom star chart of the night sky where you live, and read and watch special effects videos of fascinating astronomy topics.

2012 March 12 - The Scale of the Universe Interactive Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2012 March 12 The Scale of the Universe - Interactive Flash Animation Credit & Copyright: Cary & Michael Huang Explanation: What does the universe look like on small scales?

collect space space history and space artifacts news Long before the first Instagram from space, the first check-in from orbit, or even the first astronaut's tweet, John Glenn sent an email to Bill Clinton. The reply it prompted was the very first email transmitted by a sitting U.S. president — it just happened to be to space. April 18, 2014SpaceX launches science-packed Dragon capsule on space station supply run A commercial cargo spacecraft loaded with more than two tons of scientific experiments and equipment lifted off for the International Space Station on April 18, after more than a month of delays. SpaceX's Dragon launched on a Falcon 9 rocket from Cape Canaveral. April 17, 2014John Houbolt, NASA engineer who fought for Apollo moon landing method, dies

Astrobiobound Astrobiobound! NEW - NGSS and CCSS Designed and Aligned! Students learn systems engineering by engaging in a mission planning simulation that mirrors the search for life in our solar system.

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