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Bookish

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BrowseCollections Excessive Checkout Limit Reached. There have been too many titles checked out and returned by your account within a short period of time. Try again in several days. Open Circle Names 25 Best Books for Kids’ Social and Emotional Learning To celebrate its 25th anniversary, the Open Circle Program at the Wellesley Centers for Women (WCW), a provider of evidence-based social and emotional learning for K–5 kids, has released its list of the top 25 children’s books that connect to kids’ social and emotional development. The chosen books cover a range of important skills, such as self-awareness, self-management, empathy, dealing with conflict, and problem-solving. The Hundred Dresses, by Eleanor Estes, tops the list. “Of the countless books that teachers use to shed light on such issues as friendship, inclusion, empathy, problem solving, or understanding differences, some titles stand out for being especially authentic and memorable,” Open Circle says in its announcement.

The Best Books on Writing, NYC, Animals, and More: A Collaboration with the New York Public Library By Maria Popova As an enormous lover and patron of public libraries, I was beyond delighted when the fine folks at the New York Public Library asked me to curate a selection of books for their bookstore and gave me free range to do whatever I wished. My original thought was to do a single reading list around a specific theme, much like I had been doing for the TED bookstore. But my chronic maximalism soon kicked in — the single reading list swelled into four reading lists (wisdom on writing, great reads about New York City, heart- and brain-stirring books on pets and animals, and timeless treats for young readers) and the simple tabletop display became an elaborate installation in the bookstore’s main window. Kelli, with her own brand of idealistic maximalism, decided to turn the reading lists into a magnificent papercraft wonderland featuring oversized three-dimensional sculptures of each of the books amidst an intricate paper cityscape of the Manhattan skyline. What’s a Dog For?

The Inspiring Stories Behind 15 Classic Novels  According to Jack London, "You can't wait for inspiration, you have to go after it with a club." London himself took the inspiration for The Call of the Wild (1903) from his time spent living in Canada and Alaska during the Klondike Gold Rush when high-quality sled dogs -- like those that feature in the book -- were in impossibly high demand. The stories and inspirations behind fifteen more of literature's most memorable titles are explained here: Anna Karenina (1877), Leo Tolstoy In January 1872, the death of a 35-year-old woman was reported in the Russian press: smartly dressed and carrying a bag containing a change of clothes, the girl had thrown herself under a freight train at Yasenki Station outside Moscow. The woman was identified as Anna Pirogova, a distant relative of Leo Tolstoy's wife and the mistress of his good friend and neighbour, Alexander Bibikov. Three Men In A Boat (1889), Jerome K.

A list of top 50 Books blogs by Blog Rank Are you a bookworm who just can’t end the day without reading a page? Do you love reading fictional novels or philosophical, intellectual, non-fiction stuff? If you are any of these, then you might have been scouring around the Internet for the top book blogs. Using the search engines to find what you are looking for will help but may take you some time. Good thing, Blog Rank already did the job for you and ranked the top book blogs on the Internet and compiled them in different lists based on the ranking methods used.

Session 227: How to get Children Reading for Pleasure One major challenge for some pupils, it would appear, is getting them to read for pleasure, especially with the many distractions modern society throws at them. Other children love losing themselves in to books, getting lost in their own imaginations as they progress through the stories. This UKEdChat session explored how teachers encourage children to read for pleasure, looking at strategies that work in all educational settings. The questions explored during the session asked: a Fantasy Reader: Round of covers With many covers appearing around the web, it's time for another round of covers! First up is the UK cover art for Brandon Sanderson upcoming novel, Steelheart. The art style is the same as the previous UK release for the author. I like the style but I prefer the US art. What about you? Back in 2009 and 2010, Tor released new cover art for all the Wheel of Time books, electronic editions.

The Power of Digital Storytelling, With Kathy Schrock (plus a Zillion Resources!) “A story can put your whole brain to work. And yet, it gets better …” – The Science of Storytelling It was my great pleasure to meet the amazing Kathy Schrock this week, and to experience her wonderful keynote presentation, “Telling the Story: Lessons Learned from the Outside World“, at the TLIPAD 2014 Conference. Isn’t it amazing how there are always more things to learn about in the ever-changing world of digital technology? Not just new tools or simple techniques, but BIG ideas … like digital storytelling. Kathy explained and illustrated many fun, engaging possibilities using storytelling techniques to create lessons that provide powerful learning experiences.

Official Blog of the Public Library Association As the day wound down, attendance at the Readers’ Advisory Tool Kit III was a bit down, though still very decent. Those who lasted the full day of PLA got to hear three well-known librarians suggest more ways to get books into the hands of readers. With her section “Promoting the Backlist,” Georgine Olson of Fairbanks North Star Borough Public Library and Regional Center in Fairbanks, Alaska (is the library stationary in landscape to fit the letterhead?), spoke to something that concerns me. How do you get all the great old books off the shelves and to readers?

Australian writers pick the best books of 2014 Articulate: Helen Garner, This House of Grief. Photo: Simon Schluter Ruthless: Christos Tsiolkas, Merciless Gods. Advertisement Artfully constructed: Nicholas Jose, Bapo. A Zen Librarian: Bluestem and Monarch Shelf Talkers Over the summer, I saw an image, I think it was Jon Schu's library blog, that had what I call "shelf talkers." Basically they are little cards that are taped to the bookcase where the books are housed. The cards have a picture of the book, a synopsis of the story and a note about the contest the book is a part of.

Modern Film Adaptations Of Jane Austen, Ranked Dec. 16 is Jane Austen’s 239th birthday, and in the past two centuries, her seminal novels have been read and reread passionately by generations. More than that, however, they’ve captured the imagination of the culture in a way few other authors’ works have. Like Shakespeare, Austen has had her work adapted into major motion pictures, sequels, TV series and so much more. Most notably, Austen’s novels are so recognizable and relatable that they’ve been repeatedly adapted as modern reimaginings -- not all of them successful. Look, I get it. It’s tough to update Jane Austen’s novels for the present day.

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