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Bookreporter.com

Bookreporter.com
Bookreporter.com's Ninth Annual Mother's Day Contest and Feature Mother’s Day is a time to recognize the woman who raised and nurtured us. To celebrate, we're giving you the opportunity to win some books and goodies for you or the special lady in your life in our ninth annual "Books Mom Will Love" contest. From now through Friday, May 9th at noon ET, readers will have the chance to win one of our 10 prize packages. Special Contest: LITTLE MERCIES by Heather Gudenkauf We are celebrating the June 24th release of LITTLE MERCIES by Heather Gudenkauf with a special contest that will give 25 readers the opportunity to win an advance copy of the book and submit their comments on it.

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Books - ArtsBeat Blog - The New York Times This year’s Hugo Awards, given to the best in science fiction, turned into a referendum on the genre’s politics. Two blocks of conservative authors and fans, calling themselves the Sad Puppies and the Rabid Puppies, have argued that the Hugos have become a litmus test of political correctness, valuing the racial and sexual identities of authors over their storytelling skills. This year, the groups used their leverage to fill categories with their own preferred nominees. At the Hugos ceremony on Saturday night in Spokane, Wash. — part of the 73rd World Science Fiction Convention — five categories ended up not giving out an award; the finalists in those five categories were all Puppies-endorsed nominees. Any member of the annual convention can vote on the Hugos, and a record number of people applied for membership this year, resulting in nearly 6,000 voters. John Scalzi, whose novel “Redshirts” won the 2013 Hugo Award for Best Novel, called this year “a wake-up call for fandom.”

Invitation to World Literature Greek, by Euripides, first performed in 405 BCE The passionate loves and longings, hopes and fears of every culture live on forever in their stories. Here is your invitation to literature from around the world and across time. Complete Review A Literary Saloon and Site of Review Welcome tothe complete review: A selectively comprehensive, objectively opinionated survey of books old and new, trying to meet all your book review, preview, and information needs. the complete review: The List List #112 Our weekly round-up of the best bookish lists floating around the internet. This installment of The List List is sponsored by Random House Audio. Visit TryAudiobooks.com to get recommendations and download a free audiobook.

The Sound of the Mountain The Sound of the Mountain (Yama no Oto) is a novel by Japanese writer Yasunari Kawabata, serialized between 1949 and 1954. The Sound of the Mountain is unusually long for a Kawabata novel, running to 276 pages in its English translation. Like much of his work, it is written in short, spare prose akin to poetry, which its English-language translator Edward Seidensticker likened to a haiku in the introduction to his translation of Kawabata's best-known novel, Snow Country.

The Best of Bankside at London Design Festival 2015 South of the Thames, 'Bankside' is LDF's newest design district, and home to the iconic Oxo Tower Wharf, which is filled year-round with over 30 independent retail design studios, exhibition spaces and shops offering furniture, jewellery, homeware, and fashion. In its 18th edition this year, Designersblock was situated in the derelict but beautiful Bargehouse, showing multidisciplinary work from over 100 independent designers over three floors. Designersblock at Oxo Tower Wharf.

Book-A-Minute Classics Got another book report to do? English teachers have the inconsiderate habit of assigning mammoth-sized works of literature to read and then actually expecting you to do it. This wouldn't be so bad except that invariably the requisite reading is as boring as fly fishing in an empty lake. Half of those books don't even have discernible plots. And let's face it -- the Cliff's Notes are pretty time-consuming too.

A Zen Librarian: Bluestem and Monarch Shelf Talkers Over the summer, I saw an image, I think it was Jon Schu's library blog, that had what I call "shelf talkers." Basically they are little cards that are taped to the bookcase where the books are housed. The cards have a picture of the book, a synopsis of the story and a note about the contest the book is a part of. I created Bluestem and Monarch shelf talkers. 5 Amazing Libraries You Didn't Know You Had Access To Suz Massen, Chief of Public Services at the Frick Art Reference Library was gracious enough to come in and speak to my Intro to Reference class at Pratt Institute this week and I was surprised and excited to find out that the Frick Library is freely available to the public! This got me wondering what other great libraries are out there which I thought were closed and private that actually allow the general public access without having to apply as a researcher. Here are five amazing libraries you might not realize you have access to:

The 20 Best English-Language Independent Films of The Past 5 Years Is anybody else tired of hearing “they don’t make them like they used to”? It is easy to be cynical about the artistic output of one’s own generation. With hindsight behind the classics of old, it is easy to feel that the grass was greener in times of old. Sure, it’s easy to look at indie gems like Reservoir Dogs and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind and think “it’s been a long time since we have had a decent indie film like that.” But, on behalf of the true cinephile contingent, let me be the first to dispel this notion. Here, in the short five years between 2009 and 2014, we have seen boundaries pushed, sensibilities tested, and audiences thrilled, and often without a generous budget, or even wide theatrical release. My First Literary Crush - The books famous people loved in college. Click hereto read more from Slate's "College Week." In celebration of College Week, Slate asked journalists, cable-news personalities, novelists, Hollywood types, and other great thinkers a question: What's the most influential book you read in college? What made you slam down your café au lait and set out to conquer the world? The answers are below. Eric Alterman, media columnist, The Nation I'd like to say Thucydides or Wittgenstein, or something fancy like that, but I guess it'd have to be Ronald Steel's biography of Walter Lippmann, not only because it taught me a great deal about how power worked in American politics, but also—and more important—because it gave me a model of what I might do with my life.

Official Blog of the Public Library Association As the day wound down, attendance at the Readers’ Advisory Tool Kit III was a bit down, though still very decent. Those who lasted the full day of PLA got to hear three well-known librarians suggest more ways to get books into the hands of readers. With her section “Promoting the Backlist,” Georgine Olson of Fairbanks North Star Borough Public Library and Regional Center in Fairbanks, Alaska (is the library stationary in landscape to fit the letterhead?), spoke to something that concerns me. How do you get all the great old books off the shelves and to readers? Many just sit as readers do not make it past the displays and into the stacks.

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