background preloader

An Illustrated Guide to Space Maps

An Illustrated Guide to Space Maps
Nebra Sky Disc, Germany, 1600 BC. (Photo: Rainer Zenz/WikiCommons CC BY-SA 3.0) With its patinated bronze background and shiny gold sun, moon and stars, the 3600-year-old Nebra Sky Disc is worth gazing at for its beauty alone. But the ancient object is cool for a lot of other reasons: It’s the earliest depiction of outer space we’ve ever found, and it’s also thought to be the oldest known portable astronomical instrument. For as long as humans have stared at the sky, we have sought to understand our place in the cosmos. This lovely orb is one of a long line of attempts of humans to map the unmappable—space. The story behind the disc’s discovery is almost as crazy as the disc itself: it was dug up by metal-detector- wielding treasure hunters in 1999, along with “two swords, two axes, a chisel, and fragments of armlets.” Is it art or science? From the Harmonia Macrocosmica, Holland, 1660. From the Harmonia Macrocosmica, Holland, 1660. "Idea dell'Universo." "Systema Solare et Planetarium."

http://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/an-illustrated-guide-to-space-maps

Related:  Strange maps - Cartographies et arts!Review SoonGeographic Mapsso

New London Model A 1:2000 scale interactive model of central London is now on display at The Building Centre as part of NLA’s new permanent exhibition. The model brings the story of London’s historical and physical development to life through a sophisticated projection system integrated with films. At 12.5 metres-long, the model covers more than 85 square kilometres of London, 19 Boroughs and approximately 170,000 buildings, including 34km of the Thames with its corresponding 21 bridges. It extends from King’s Cross in the north to Peckham in the south and the Royal Docks in the east to Old Oak Common in the west. Touchscreens allow buildings and major infrastructure projects to be brought to life across the surface of the model, showing the key areas of change and revealing the sheer scale of proposed development in the capital.

The Paradox of Flow It's a Sunday afternoon and I'm on my computer. I've spent and hour sketching things out and now I'm editing the drawings to create a video. The self-doubt that I felt in my first sketchy video is no longer there. Old maps of Seven Seas (Open Ocean) How does it work? These instructions will show you how to find historical maps online. Getting started Type the place name in the search box to find the exact location. You can further adjust the search by zooming in and out.

Worldmapper: The world as you've never seen it before This map uses data from 'Ethnologue: Languages of the World', and shows the number of languages considered indigenous to each country that are still spoken there. Due to issues of language identification (see technical notes), it is possible to dispute the data used here, and a review of Ethnologue by Campbell and Grondona (2008) does just that; they claim "... the number of indigenous ('living') languages of different countries is inflated ...". However, the map presents a good picture of linguistic diversity. Papua New Guinea has nearly 10% (820) of the world's indigenous living languages, so that there are only an average of 7000 speakers per language living there. Indonesia (737), Nigeria (510), and India (415) also have a large number of native languages.

Site Map of timeanddate.com Search Site / Articles City / Country Social Share this page / Follow us on: map-of-the-internet-10-explore-this-beautiful-handdrawn-map-of-the-online-world-9098834 Vargic began the project in December 2013, using old National Geographic maps for visual inspiration and Alexa data of the most visited websites in the world to scale the different land masses. Perhaps the amazing fact is that the map was drawn free hand, directly into Photoshop. "My map is divided into two distinct parts,” Vargic explained to The Independent. “The eastern continent, the Old World, showcases software companies, gaming companies and some of the more real-life oriented websites."

Every language evolved from 'single prehistoric mother tongue first spoken in Africa' By David Derbyshire Updated: 00:25 GMT, 17 April 2011 500 languages traced back to Stone Age dialectThe further away from Africa a language is spoken, the fewer distinct sounds it hasEnglish has around 46 sounds, while the San bushmen of South Africa use a staggering 200Study finds speech evolved 'at least 100,000 years ago' Every language in the world - from English to Mandarin - evolved from a prehistoric 'mother tongue' first spoken in Africa tens of thousands of years ago, a new study reveals. After analysing more than 500 languages, Dr Quentin Atkinson found compelling evidence that they can be traced back to a long-forgotten dialect spoken by our Stone Age ancestors. The findings don't just pinpoint the origin of language to Africa - they also show that speech evolved at least 100,000 years ago, far earlier than previously thought. Enlarge

A sneak preview of 3D Imaging at the Osher Map Library and Smith Center for Cartographic Education Moving forward into the future of digitizing our cultural heritage, OML’s Digital Imaging Center is engaged in an innovative project to three-dimensionally image the library’s rare globe collection, the second-largest of its kind in a U.S. public institution. Generous grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Friends of the Osher Map Library support the conservation, and subsequent 3D imaging, of the collection's most threatened or valuable items. Digitization will make it possible for students and members of the public to manipulate and examine the rare globes online, preventing potential handling damage to these delicate objects.

StudiSverige - YouTube Categories Pinterest Log in More to explore: 'Mapping Brooklyn,' a Joint Exhibition of BRIC and the Brooklyn Historical Society, Explores the Complexities of the Borough Logan Square: the "Brooklyn" of Chicago. Oakland: the "Brooklyn" of San Francisco. NYC's 71-square-mile borough to the east has become such a strong cultural metaphor, so easily abstracted to explain other cities, that one can lose sight of the things that make it Brooklyn, not "Brooklyn."

Evolution of Language Takes Unexpected Turn It’s widely thought that human language evolved in universally similar ways, following trajectories common across place and culture, and possibly reflecting common linguistic structures in our brains. But a massive, millennium-spanning analysis of humanity’s major language families suggests otherwise. Instead, language seems to have evolved along varied, complicated paths, guided less by neurological settings than cultural circumstance. If our minds do shape the evolution of language, it’s likely at levels deeper and more nuanced than many researchers anticipated. “It’s terribly important to understand human cognition, and how the human mind is put together,” said Michael Dunn, an evolutionary linguist at Germany’s Max Planck Institute and co-author of the new study, published April 14 in Nature.

A Wonderfully Stereotypical 1970s Map of New York How might a person who’s never left New York City view the rest of the world? Perhaps with Manhattan taking up 80 percent of the U.S., the other four boroughs 10 percent, the Midwest completely nonexistent, and foreign countries reduced to vague presences somewhere across the water. That’s the view of this wonderful 1970s map lampooning a New Yorker’s self-centered geography. The snarky cartographer remains anonymous, according to the David Rumsey Map Collection.

Related: