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Book Reviews, Excerpts, eBooks and Reader Exclusives - HuffPost Books

Book Reviews, Excerpts, eBooks and Reader Exclusives - HuffPost Books
Parable of the Sower In case you've ever looked at the whitewashed array of dystopian and post-apocalyptic books that line the shelves and asked yourself, "Do people of color survive the apocalypse?" the answer is yes. Read these books. Water is one of the most organic and natural substances on the planet and is essential to good health, yet rarely do we think about how it can cleanse, heal, and transform our lives. Red Room

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The 25 Best Websites for Literature Lovers It’s an interesting relationship that book lovers have with the Internet: most would rather read a physical book than something on an iPad or Kindle, and even though an Amazon purchase is just two or three clicks away, dedicated readers would rather take a trip to their local indie bookstore. Yet the literary world occupies a decent-sized space on the web. Readers, writers, publishers, editors, and everybody in between are tweeting, Tumbling, blogging, and probably even Vine-ing about their favorite books. In case the demise of Google Reader threw your literary Internet browsing into a dark void, here’s a list of 25 book sites to bookmark. The Millions Booktopia - A Book Bloggers' Paradise - The No. 1 Book Blog for Australia To celebrate January, Booktopia’s Month of Australian Stories, we asked you just who is Australia’s Favourite Novelist. The response was overwhelming, and after tens of thousands of votes were cast, these are the results. Australia’s 50 Favourite Australian Novelists for 2013. If you aren’t familiar with any of them, there’s no better time than now to get familiar and celebrate Australian Literature this year with Booktopia, Australia’s Local Bookstore. 50.

Books Archives The first time I read Matthew Salesses’ work was five years ago, when we were published together in a (now-defunct) online literary journal, Pindeldyboz. Matt’s flash fiction story, one of several that would eventually form his chapbook collection Our Island of Epidemics, blew me away for its mingling of lyricism, surprise, myth, and human longing. After I reached out to tell him I admired his work, we became friends, and since then I’ve followed his career closely, as he’s published the chapbook, a novella (The Last Repatriate), a novel-in-flash (I’m Not Saying, I’m Just Saying), an ebook of essays (Different Racisms), and now, his first full-length novel, The Hundred Year Flood. What I admire about Matt is how he is able to tackle different genres, different aesthetics, and different forms, all with the same insight and empathy that first captured me in that first piece of flash I encountered. Karissa Chen: I’d like to start off by talking a little bit about the genesis of this book.

McSweeney’s: Quarterly & Books Timothy McSweeney’sQuarterly Concern McSweeney’s began in 1998 as a literary journal that published only works rejected by other magazines. That rule was soon abandoned, and since then McSweeney’s has attracted work from some of the finest writers in the country, including Denis Johnson, Jonathan Franzen, William T. Vollmann, Rick Moody, Joyce Carol Oates, Heidi Julavits, Jonathan Lethem, Michael Chabon, Ben Marcus, Susan Straight, Roddy Doyle, T.C. The latest in books and fiction Our privacy promise The New Yorker's Strongbox is designed to let you communicate with our writers and editors with greater anonymity and security than afforded by conventional e-mail. When you visit or use our public Strongbox server at The New Yorker and our parent company, Condé Nast, will not record your I.P. address or information about your browser, computer, or operating system, nor will we embed third-party content or deliver cookies to your browser.

Book reviews: Find the best new books {*style:<ul>*} {*style:<li>*} {*style:<br>*}{*style:<b>*}Victoria{*style:</b>*}{*style:<br>*} by Daisy Goodwin{*style:<br>*}If you love history, you have to read this book. If you think this historical era is not your cup of tea, also try this novel. We meet a young lady who is not stucked up....{*style:<br>*} {*style:<a href=' more{*style:</a>*} {*style:</li>*} {*style:<li>*} {*style:<br>*}{*style:<b>*}Victoria{*style:</b>*}{*style:<br>*} by Daisy Goodwin{*style:<br>*}Victoria by Daisy Goodwin was a very easy read. It portrays only a small snapshot of Victoria's life within a 2-3 year span, from the time she took the throne to the ...{*style:<br>*} {*style:<a href=' more{*style:</a>*} {*style:</li>*} {*style:<li>*} {*style:<br>*}{*style:<b>*}Victoria{*style:</b>*}{*style:<br>*} by Daisy Goodwin{*style:<br>*}Everything I have previously read about about Queen Victoria had to do with her later years as a Mother, Wife, and grieving Widow.

Book News, Reviews, Author Interviews & Recommendations Comment Why Nick Cave joined writers' call on the government to explain Sam Twyford-Moore 8:23pm Nick Cave – the dark prince of rock 'n' roll, an Australian icon with true standing on the international stage – is not just a singer and songwriter. He's a novelist and a poet too. And all of his work in music has been informed by this literary identity. Words Without Borders: Current Issue Image: Do Ho Suh, "Fallen Star," 2012 © Do Ho Suh. Stuart Collection, University of California, San Diego. Photo: Philipp Scholz Rittermann This month we're spotlighting South Korea.

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