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Complete Review - Welcome to the Complete Review

Complete Review - Welcome to the Complete Review
A Literary Saloon and Site of Review Welcome tothe complete review: A selectively comprehensive, objectively opinionated survey of books old and new, trying to meet all your book review, preview, and information needs. the complete review: This site offers: What's New: Reviews of books that have recently been published or republished, that are in the news, or that we have recently added to the complete review's archives, as well as review-overviews of titles that we haven't yet reviewed, but where we've collected all the links and review-summaries for you. Return to top of page. To learn more about this site and the complete review go to these pages: Further information is available on these pages:

overbooked.com: a resource for readers Bookgasm: Reading Material to Get Excited About The Invisible Library GoldWave - Audio Editing, Recording, Conversion, Restoration, & Analysis Software The PLA Blog | Official Blog of the Public Library Association As the day wound down, attendance at the Readers’ Advisory Tool Kit III was a bit down, though still very decent. Those who lasted the full day of PLA got to hear three well-known librarians suggest more ways to get books into the hands of readers. With her section “Promoting the Backlist,” Georgine Olson of Fairbanks North Star Borough Public Library and Regional Center in Fairbanks, Alaska (is the library stationary in landscape to fit the letterhead?), spoke to something that concerns me. How do you get all the great old books off the shelves and to readers? Many just sit as readers do not make it past the displays and into the stacks. Part of the answer is that we actually do have to move them – put them on the displays that are catching the readers’ eyes. Booklists are another way to draw attention to older books. Olson also told her rules for making Read-a-Like lists. Saricks regrets that she has not kept notes on every book she has ever read.

Bookreporter.com Issue 94 | March 2010 Gmaps Pedometer ANZ LitLovers LitBlog | For lovers of Australian and New Zealand literary fiction; Ambassador for Australian literature The Book Brothel love german books Anatomy of Aggregate Collections: The Example of Google Print for Libraries Introduction Google's December 2004 announcement [1] of its intention to collaborate with five major research libraries – Harvard University, the University of Michigan, Stanford University, the University of Oxford, and the New York Public Library – to digitize and surface their print book collections in the Google searching universe has, predictably, stirred conflicting opinion, with some viewing the project as a welcome opportunity to enhance the visibility of library collections in new environments, and others wary of Google's prospective role as gateway to these collections [2]. The project has been vigorously debated on discussion lists and blogs, with the participating libraries commonly referred to as "the Google 5". One point most observers seem to concede is that the questions raised by this initiative are both timely and significant. The Google Print Library Project (GPLP) [3] has galvanized a long overdue, multi-faceted discussion about library print book collections.

A Zen Librarian: Bluestem and Monarch Shelf Talkers Over the summer, I saw an image, I think it was Jon Schu's library blog, that had what I call "shelf talkers." Basically they are little cards that are taped to the bookcase where the books are housed. The cards have a picture of the book, a synopsis of the story and a note about the contest the book is a part of. I created Bluestem and Monarch shelf talkers. Here is an image of the shelf talker that got me started. Here is an example of one of my shelf talkers. Here is a link to the shelf talkers.

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