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Using Primary Sources - Teachers

Using Primary Sources - Teachers
Primary sources are the raw materials of history — original documents and objects which were created at the time under study. They are different from secondary sources, accounts or interpretations of events created by someone without firsthand experience. Examining primary sources gives students a powerful sense of history and the complexity of the past. Helping students analyze primary sources can also guide them toward higher-order thinking and better critical thinking and analysis skills. Before you begin: Choose at least two or three primary sources that support the learning objectives and are accessible to students. 1. Draw on students’ prior knowledge of the topic. Ask students to closely observe each primary source. Who created this primary source? Help students see key details. What do you see that you didn’t expect? Encourage students to think about their personal response to the source. What feelings and thoughts does the primary source trigger in you? 2. 3. Top

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ePals Global Community Project: Literature Circles Students work in small groups reading a novel and assuming various roles in the Literature Circle in order to demonstrate their understanding of the novel and share... Project: Email Exchange Students will engage in an ePals email exchange, practicing the skills of collaboration and communication while building friendships and learning about the daily lives and cultures of others around the world. Collaborative Detective Story

A Guide To Finding Digital Books: 20+ Free Online Libraries It’s a shame more people are not aware of the wide array of free online libraries. Databases, books, videos, audio recordings and e-books are available, just waiting to be viewed and used. This guide will help avid readers, serious researchers and casual surfers alike get the most out of free web libraries. Why Use Primary Sources? Primary sources provide a window into the past—unfiltered access to the record of artistic, social, scientific and political thought and achievement during the specific period under study, produced by people who lived during that period. Bringing young people into close contact with these unique, often profoundly personal, documents and objects can give them a very real sense of what it was like to be alive during a long-past era. 1. Engage students Primary sources help students relate in a personal way to events of the past and promote a deeper understanding of history as a series of human events.Because primary sources are snippets of history, they encourage students to seek additional evidence through research.First-person accounts of events helps make them more real, fostering active reading and response.

Raymond Bykes, Western Union No. 23, Norfolk Va. Said he was fourteen years old. Works until after one A.M. every night. He is precocious and not a little "tough." Has been here at this office for only three months, but he already knows the Red Light Dist The Library of Congress does not own rights to material in its collections. Therefore, it does not license or charge permission fees for use of such material and cannot grant or deny permission to publish or otherwise distribute the material. Ultimately, it is the researcher's obligation to assess copyright or other use restrictions and obtain permission from third parties when necessary before publishing or otherwise distributing materials found in the Library's collections.

OED birthday word generator: which words originated in your birth year? Do you know which words entered the English language around the same time you entered the world? Use our OED birthday word generator to find out! We’ve scoured the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) to find words with a first known usage for each year from 1900 to 2004. Simply select the relevant decade and click on your birth year to discover a word which entered the English language that year. Please note that the dates given for these words refer to the current first known usage of the word.

Titles with full-text online "The 1688 Paradise Lost and Dr. Aldrich": Metropolitan Museum Journal, v. 6 (1972) Boorsch, Suzanne (1972) 20th-Century Art: A Resource for Educators Paul, Stella (1999) 82nd & Fifth The Metropolitan Museum of Art (2013) Cool Sites for Middle School Students Online Fun and Games FunBrain - Games for math, reading, and other stuff. Online Games for Kids - From Scholastic. Orisinal - Good games here. PBS Kids Games - Online games Knowledge Adventure Games National Geographic Games - Games, puzzles, mystery photos, and word searches. May one stream a Netflix Video for in-class use? I have been asked more than once by a faculty member, may I stream Netflix videos to my classroom? Most Netflix videos, unless they are older films in the Public Domain, are protected by copyright. However, there are statutory exceptions that allow educators to show all or portions of films in an educational classroom.

Library Of Congress Unveils Massive Common Core Resource Center The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) is here and teachers are trying to figure out how to best integrate it into their tried-and-true lessons. They’re struggling to integrate technology to best augment CCSS. They are in desperate need of classroom materials that they can trust. Like a superhero, the U.S. Library of Congress has just swooped in and unveiled an enormous new (and free!)

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