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Professor Emeritus, Medieval History, University of Kansas

Professor Emeritus, Medieval History, University of Kansas
Please take into consideration the purpose and audience for which the lecture notes listed above were written. For a good many years, I taught a three-credit-hour freshman survey entitled Introduction to Medieval History to enrollments of room-size - generally three hundred students. During those years, the University of Kansas maintained an open enrollment policy in which all graduates from accredited Kansas high schools were admitted to the University. Since the only history courses required by the State of Kansas at the secondary level were in American History, students enrolling for this course varied widely in their knowledge of the European past. Consequently, my lectures were both basic and episodic, concentrating on major events and topics that would prepare the students for further enrollments in Humanities courses and attempting to demonstrate that the study of History could be both useful and enjoyable.

http://www.vlib.us/medieval/lectures/

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Canadian Journal of Sociology The Canadian Journal of Sociology publishes rigorously peer-reviewed research articles and innovative theoretical essays by social scientists from around the world, providing insight into the issues facing Canadian society as well as social and cultural systems in other countries. The journal also features a lively debate/commentary section encouraging the intensive exchange of ideas, along with regular sections such as “Notes on Society” that address topical issues of the day from a social science point of view and “Notes on the Discipline” designed to discuss a variety of issues encountered in the course of the sociological analysis of modern society. Each issue of the journal also has a comprehensive book review section. Announcements Vol 39, No 1 (2014)

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‘The Bad-Ass Librarians of Timbuktu,’ by Joshua Hammer Photo THE BAD-ASS LIBRARIANS OF TIMBUKTUAnd Their Race to Save the World’s Most Precious ManuscriptsBy Joshua Hammer278 pp. Simon & Schuster. $26. In the summer of 1826, a Scotsman named Alexander Gordon Laing became the first European to set foot in Timbuktu, a city that would become synonymous with mysterious remoteness. The inhabitants of Timbuktu would have been amused by the British imperialist assumption that their city had been “discovered.”

Family tree of the Greek gods Greek cosmological entities Essential Olympians and Titans The essential Olympians' names are given in bold font. See also List of Greek mythological figures Database of the Power Elite Welcome to the Power Elite portal on WhoRulesAmerica.net. Included here is a database of the "Power Elite" in the U.S. as of 2011-2012, defined as the intersection of the boards of directors of the corporate community, the extremely wealthy and well-connected, and the boards and trustees of the policy-planning network. Note that this definition does not include politicans; you will not find any current or former presidents in the database. (See "The Class-Domination Theory of Power" for more information.) There are four different kinds of searches you can do, each of which yields slightly different results. If you search for a person's name and set the results type to People, you will receive information on each person whose name matches the pattern you entered.

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