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Tan Le: A headset that reads your brainwaves

Tan Le: A headset that reads your brainwaves

http://www.ted.com/talks/tan_le_a_headset_that_reads_your_brainwaves.html

Related:  Inventions & Gadgetsevolving interfacesComputer-Human Interface

The Gramophone iPod Dock Remembers It’s Roots Before the iPod, there was the CD Player, before that there was the tape player, before that there was the eight track player, and before that there was the record player. In the earliest days of music, there was the gramophone – a record player with a type of horn attached that acts as a speaker. The Gramophone iPod Dock pays homage to the early days of recorded music by providing a robust iPod dock shaped like the iPod’s ancestor. Smartwatches shouldn't look like watches - Jul. 3, 2013 Sony's Smartwatch 2 has a fatal flaw: It still looks like a watch. NEW YORK (CNNMoney) This year's iteration boasts a waterproof housing, a few extra pixels in a slightly larger display, and NFC (near-field communication) functionality, but the basic concept is unchanged from the last generation. Sony (SNE) expects us to interact with its smartwatches as though they were dumbed-down smartphones. It's an idea that will immediately resonate with the masses.

Paralyzed woman controls robotic arm, sips coffee Performing even a simple movement is a rather complicated process. First, the brain has to signal its intent to perform an action, which then gets translated into the specific motions that are required to achieve that intention. Those motions require a series of muscle contractions; the signals for these need to be sent out of the brain, through the spinal cord, and to the appropriate destination. For most people who suffer from paralysis, it's really these later steps that are affected—most of the setup can still go on in the brain, but damage keeps the signals from making their way to the muscles.

Binaural beats Binaural beats To experience the binaural beats perception, it is best to listen to this file with headphones on moderate to weak volume – the sound should be easily heard, but not loud. Note that the sound appears to pulsate. Neuro Evolving Robotic Operatives Neuro-Evolving Robotic Operatives, or NERO for short, is a unique computer game that lets you play with adapting intelligent agents hands-on. Evolve your own robot army by tuning their artificial brains for challenging tasks, then pit them against your friends' teams in online competitions! New features in NERO 2.0 include an interactive game mode called territory capture, as well as a new user interface and more extensive training tools. NERO is a result of an academic research project in artificial intelligence, based on the rtNEAT algorithm. It is also a platform for future research on intelligent agent technology. The NERO project is run by the Neural Networks Group of the Department of Computer Sciences at the University of Texas at Austin .

The company that powers Google Hangouts wants to radically disrupt all business videoconferencing Video is the new audio. With more emotion, more nuance, and more effective real-time communication, videoconferencing is growing at a 20 percent annual rate in business. But that’s not fast enough for Vidyo, the company that Google tapped for the technology behind Google+ Hangouts. To accelerate growth of the videoconferencing industry — and grab share from market leaders like Cisco and Polycom – Vidyo is employing the traditional web nuclear weapon: free. “We want to transform business-to-business video,” Vidyo senior vice-president Marty Hollander told VentureBeat. “Everything from high quality and high cost to free web-based services.”

Hackers backdoor the human brain, successfully extract sensitive data With a chilling hint of the not-so-distant future, researchers at the Usenix Security conference have demonstrated a zero-day vulnerability in your brain. Using a commercial off-the-shelf brain-computer interface, the researchers have shown that it’s possible to hack your brain, forcing you to reveal information that you’d rather keep secret. As we’ve covered in the past, a brain-computer interface is a two-part device: There’s the hardware — which is usually a headset (an EEG; an electroencephalograph) with sensors that rest on your scalp — and software, which processes your brain activity and tries to work out what you’re trying to do (turn left, double click, open box, etc.) BCIs are generally used in a medical setting with very expensive equipment, but in the last few years cheaper, commercial offerings have emerged. For $200-300, you can buy an Emotiv (pictured above) or Neurosky BCI, go through a short training process, and begin mind controlling your computer.

Brain Hacking: Scientists Extract Personal Secrets With Commercial Hardware Chalk this up to super-creepy: scientists have discovered a way to mind-read personal secrets, such as bank PIN numbers and personal associations, using a cheap headset. Utilizing commercial brain-wave reading devices, often used for hands-free gaming, the researchers discovered that they could identify when subjects recognized familiar objects, faces, or locations, which helped them better guess sensitive information. Security interrogators could benefit most immediately from the new brain hacking technique, since it would reveal when suspects are actually familiar with the face of a potential accomplice. Bedphones Are Thin, Light So You Can Sleep Place these impossibly thin and small Bedphones over your ears and soon you'll be drifting off to sleepytime land. The idea was to create unobtrusive headphones that would be conducive to sleep, and at a quarter-inch thick, you'll probably forget you're wearing them. Their "memory wire" gently clamps the phones to your ears, and the attached cable connects to any music player or mobile device with a standard 3.5mm headphone jack.

"Virtual Retinal Display" Does Exactly What Its Name Implies What's the Latest Development? A company called Avegant has developed a prototype of a head-mounted display that could take virtual reality to a brand-new level: Currently going by the name "Virtual Retinal Display," it works by projecting an image directly onto each of the wearer's retinas. The result, says writer Tim Stevens, is one in which "[p]ixels seem to blend together seamlessly, creating an incredibly bright and vibrant image." The latest prototype looks like two circuit boards set on an eyeglass frame; Avegant CTO and co-founder Allan Evans says the company is working with industrial design experts to create a more attractive version in time for next January's Consumer Electronics Show. What's the Big Idea? Retinal projection technology was considered so challenging that the makers of Google Glass decided to avoid it for its product.

BrainPort® V100 The BrainPort V100 is a non-surgical assistive device intended for orientation, mobility, object identification, and spot reading by individuals who are blind with no useful vision. It translates digital information from a video camera into gentle electrical stimulation patterns on the surface of the tongue. Users feel moving bubble-like patterns on their tongue which they learn to interpret as the shape, size, location and motion of objects in their environment. The BrainPort V100 is intended to augment rather than replace other assistive technologies such as the white cane or dog guide. The BrainPort V100 device is an Investigational Device and its use remains limited by U.S. Federal Law to investigational uses only.

Hacking your BRAIN: Scientists reveal they can find out your PIN number using a cheap scanner Technique uses a freely available headset often used to control gamesResearchers used it to watch for numbers a person recognised, which triggered a spike in a certain type of brain activitySay it could be used by police to interrogate suspects By Mark Prigg Published: 11:45 GMT, 27 August 2012 | Updated: 20:01 GMT, 27 August 2012

Finally, Disposable Thumb Drives! No matter what I do I just can’t seem to hang onto a thumb drive. If I attach one to my keys, the clip breaks, and it goes missing. If I keep one in my pocket, one day I notice it’s just not there anymore. If I keep one in my laptop bag, it disappears mysteriously. Thankfully, Art Lebedev has created a solution to my thumb drive woes – the disposable thumb drive.

One might use Tan Le's headset as an ongoing from of Christopher deCharms' [Christopher deCharms looks inside the brain | TED] realtime brainintrospection to exercise the brain. Or does the 'crudeness' of the headset's signals compared to those of fMRI and EEG make such a use impossible? by kaspervandenberg Jan 12

Tan Le talks about an EEG headset as an input device. Compared to hospital EEGs the headset is easier to wear, cheaper, and also less accurate. Perhaps this device can help some people with impairments. Tan Le demonstrates a man controlling a wheelchair. However some neurological afflictions might aversely affect the headset. How many different 'toughts' can this head set distinguish? Perhaps headset would work great in combination with dasher etc. by kaspervandenberg Jan 12

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